Android edges Apple iPad as second-most-popular mobile development platform

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Google's Android platform has narrowly overtaken the Apple iPad in terms of total developer support for mobile devices, though the iPhone remains the most popular software destination, according to a new report.



The new study, released Thursday by cross-platform mobile ad network Millennial Media and DigiDay, found that 30 percent of developers are currently creating content for the iPhone. In second is Android, with 23 percent, followed in third by the iPad with 21 percent.



Developers surveyed also indicated in the "State of the Apps Industry" report that they plan to support Android in 2011, with 29 percent saying Google's mobile operating system is the new platform they will embrace next year. Another 20 percent said they will expand to the iPad, and 20 percent also plan to write software for Windows Phone 7. A small percentage of developers -- 8 percent -- who are not currently writing for the iPhone will do so next year.



"We have seen significant cross-platform adoption in the past year and can expect to see continued growth and diversity in the coming year," said Mack McKelvey, senior vice president of marketing at Millennial Media.



Developers ranked the reach of a platform as their top consideration when choosing what they will develop for. Demographics were the second most important concern, followed by better branding, ease of use, and higher sales potential, respectively.







Publishers expect that applications will see significant growth in revenue in 2011. Of those surveyed, 31 percent said they believe they will see an increase of 100 percent or more in revenue next year, and another 34 percent expect their earnings to increase by at least 25 percent.



Last month, Millennial Media revealed that online ad revenue from the iPad grew 316 percent in the third quarter of 2010. In that same period, the total number of advertisers supporting Apple's touchscreen tablet increased by 94 percent.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 98
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Which is to say 51% developing for iOS vs 23% for Android. At some point we're going to have to start talking about platforms instead of devices, or risk making no sense at all, particularly as Apple is even now converging their mobile OS across form factors.



    Do we break out figures for "netbook" developers vs. "laptop" developers?
  • Reply 2 of 98
    Please tell me where to take the "I plan on buying a private jet in 2011" survey so I can have my input registered as a solid data point.



    haha
  • Reply 3 of 98
    cimcim Posts: 197member
    Another stupid flamebait post essentially making things up for ad impressions.



    iOS (51%) is crushing Android (23%).
  • Reply 4 of 98
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,389member
    Since iPhone developers are by default iPad developers since the apps both run on the same OS, isn't this report a little skewed?
  • Reply 5 of 98
    cbswecbswe Posts: 116member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    Since iPhone developers are by default iPad developers since the apps both run on the same OS, isn't this report a little skewed?



    not really. the iPad is capable of running iPhone apps in a similar manner to how OS X used to run OS Classic apps.
  • Reply 6 of 98
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    Since iPhone developers are by default iPad developers since the apps both run on the same OS, isn't this report a little skewed?



    And are developers only able to develop on one "platform"? Where do they register those who develop on multiple devices?



    A pie chart is not the proper medium for this analysis.
  • Reply 7 of 98
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cbswe View Post


    not really. the iPad is capable of running iPhone apps in a similar manner to how OS X used to run OS Classic apps.



    Very different manner from Classic, which involved some fairly lifting in software emulation. The iPad either runs the iPhone apps bone stock or scales them up to fit the screen.
  • Reply 8 of 98
    Face it, if you develop an app for the iPhone it's not much of a reach to adapt it to the iPad--they do run the same OS after all. iPhone developers are pretty much the same thing as iPad developers, and talk about them as if they are not is silly. This premise of this article is pretty much comparing apples to oranges.
  • Reply 9 of 98
    gustavgustav Posts: 823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    Since iPhone developers are by default iPad developers since the apps both run on the same OS, isn't this report a little skewed?



    I really hope iPhone developers don't just think they can stretch the content area out and it's suddenly an iPad app. While the coding is largely the same, the UI design is markedly different.



    Arcade style games aside, iPad developers should concentrate on developing a "full-size" UI where the large screen is conducive to full size content areas, popup views, etc. that work on a larger screen. iPhone developers should concentrate on how the user can quickly access all of the apps content on a small screen - a lot more prioritizing and presentation of features is required.
  • Reply 10 of 98
    gustavgustav Posts: 823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Very different manner from Classic, which involved some fairly lifting in software emulation. The iPad either runs the iPhone apps bone stock or scales them up to fit the screen.



    True enough, although it doesn't make the apps fit the screen, there is still a border in 2x mode. However, the point is still valid - running an iPhone app on the iPad is not making full use of the form factor of the device.
  • Reply 11 of 98
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Which is to say 51% developing for iOS vs 23% for Android. At some point we're going to have to start talking about platforms instead of devices, or risk making no sense at all, particularly as Apple is even now converging their mobile OS across form factors.



    Do we break out figures for "netbook" developers vs. "laptop" developers?



    Did you miss Chart B? Showed a very different story.
  • Reply 12 of 98
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,563member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cbswe View Post


    not really. the iPad is capable of running iPhone apps in a similar manner to how OS X used to run OS Classic apps.



    Actually, the iPad runs iPhone apps more like the way OS/2 v2.0 ran Windows 3.0 apps, well, except that the iPhone apps usually run ok on the iPad. But it feels equally frustrating. (Technically, there is little, or no, similarity, though.)
  • Reply 13 of 98
    irelandireland Posts: 17,526member
    Don't make fun of Google and MS, you'll be eating crow one day. That said, iOS will do just fine.
  • Reply 14 of 98
    boogabooga Posts: 1,076member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Very different manner from Classic, which involved some fairly lifting in software emulation. The iPad either runs the iPhone apps bone stock or scales them up to fit the screen.



    However, it should also be noted that an iPad will use Retina Display graphics when in 2x mode when available, so most iPhone games these days when run at 2x look almost the same as a full-resolution iPad app and run at full speed as well. Very different from an emulation layer.



    Also, when it comes to full-screen games it's fairly easy to add iPad support if you're already doing retina support from a developer's point of view.
  • Reply 15 of 98
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CIM View Post


    Another stupid flamebait post essentially making things up for ad impressions.



    iOS (51%) is crushing Android (23%).



    Whoever made those pie charts should never be allowed to perform data anlaysis again. You can't simply add up the iPhone and iPad shares and assume they are mutually exclusive. Also, if you are calling the iPhone and iPad different platforms (since they are separated on the chart), then you shouldn't even be making comparisons between the iPad and Android, since Android is nearly entirely about phones (for now) not tablets.



    This whole analysis assumes that developers will only develop for a single platform and that there is no overlap in development capabilities between platforms (like iPhone and iPad).



    The entire analysis should be used as a case study on how NOT to perform analysis.
  • Reply 16 of 98
    desuserigndesuserign Posts: 1,316member
    So which one of the scores of Android devices has single-handedly edged out the iPad in developer interest?
  • Reply 17 of 98
    I work and live in Silicon Valley and I see about 20 iPhones for every Android phone.



    At work, I don't know anyone who has an Android phone, yet I counted 37 that have an iPhone.



    I attend San Jose Sharks hockey games--I am a season ticket holder, in fact. While in my seat, during a stoppage in play and intermissions, people usually whip out their phones--I know because I can look down and over their shoulders. Again, I see about 20 iPhones, a Symbian phone here and there, and the occasional RAZR.



    Am I missing something here? Who has an Android phone?
  • Reply 18 of 98
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,793member
    Umm, and what about developers that are going to go multi-platform!?



    And why is it platform vs. device here? iPad, iPhone vs Android!? Shouldn't it be iOS vs. Android. There are still new devices being released with Android 1.6. A developer will have to target which Android version to develop for. If they opt for 2.2, then their app won't run on some of these new devices. And if you say, they can create an app that tests which version of the OS is running, then this is also true for iPhone and iPad, as there are currently apps that can run on both devices.



    This report makes no sense what-so-ever.
  • Reply 19 of 98
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post


    I work and live in Silicon Valley and I see about 20 iPhones for every Android phone.



    At work, I don't know anyone who has an Android phone, yet I counted 37 that have an iPhone.



    I attend San Jose Sharks hockey games--I am a season ticket holder, in fact. While in my seat, during a stoppage in play and intermissions, people usually whip out their phones--I know because I can look down and over their shoulders. Again, I see about 20 iPhones, a Symbian phone here and there, and the occasional RAZR.



    Am I missing something here? Who has an Android phone?



    Nope, you're not missing something here... and "who has an Android"? Apparently people who are embarrassed to show them off in public.
  • Reply 20 of 98
    So... is this based on apps/developers available in the app store (for iPad) vs. Android Market? If so, *YAWN* I wonder what Apple's number's would be if they allowed basically every single app submitted to be published to the App Store like is allowed in the Android Market?
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