RIM's PlayBook will take on Apple's iPad with a price under $500

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  • Reply 121 of 132
    h2ph2p Posts: 313member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crift2012 View Post


    ...when Jobs says a 7-in tablet is DOA, I would not bet against him. What other company has even put in a fraction of the time developing and researching what size is a ideal form factor for a tablet? its purely reactionary...



    Well said. Jobs and Company have been astutely researching these issues... although I still think a 7" size may be a good addition at some point.
  • Reply 122 of 132
    grkinggrking Posts: 533member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TechManMike View Post


    I totally agree! The Playbook is a device that will pretty much be useless without an actual Blackberry handset. And with the popularity of the blackberry handset dwindling, it's just pretty impractical to think that a person will buy a phone with failing popularity just so that they can have a playbook. I am an owner of the original storm and I can't wait until my contract is up so that I can change platforms. I Will never again buy another RIM device, they are horrible when it comes to support. And more importantly, they are horrible when it comes to innovation and creativity.



    Blackberry dwindling? They sold nearly 12 million handsets in the 3rd quarter, which is a 40% increase over the year before. Hardly dwindling. Yes, I know that is not the same as massive increase in Android sets, but it also not an indication of a RIM death knell as the press likes to claim.
  • Reply 123 of 132
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    I do not know if it will be successful, but the one area I think it does have a real chance is the Medical setting. The size fits in the pockets of standard doctor jackets, and BB security meets or exceeds federal HIPAA requirements - so it would be perfect for electronic transfer of records.



    Is this why the clipboard size has prevailed for about 80 years, and several healthcare organizations that own hospitals are doing in-house iPad integration work for an upcoming system-wide rollout?
  • Reply 124 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    I do not know if it will be successful, but the one area I think it does have a real chance is the Medical setting. The size fits in the pockets of standard doctor jackets, and BB security meets or exceeds federal HIPAA requirements - so it would be perfect for electronic transfer of records.



    It could be successful in medical -- especially if the software is there.



    There are a lot of medical apps already written for the iPad.



    I think iOS 4.2 satisfies the security requirements.





    I searched a couple of months back for lab coats and other medical garb that had pockets big enough for the iPad -- rather tedious job looking up pocket sizes. It wasn't too successful.



    But that has changed. Medical clothing manufacturers are now advertising iPad-ready clothing. There must be a demand!.



    http://www.uniformsandscrub.com/thum...deep=1&cid=481





    Finally, the budget issue I mentioned -- here's an interesting link -- including some medical:



    http://www.tuaw.com/2010/11/11/ipad-...-corporations/



    And the slide show at:



    http://www.boxtone.com/products/smar...rise_ipad.aspx



    .
  • Reply 125 of 132
    grkinggrking Posts: 533member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    Is this why the clipboard size has prevailed for about 80 years, and several healthcare organizations that own hospitals are doing in-house iPad integration work for an upcoming system-wide rollout?



    Clipboards = paper = standard size of 8.5 x 11. Until the advent of tablet computers, there was not much in the way of an alternative to paper. Also, if you notice, most doctors carry a pocket version of the PDR and a small flip style notebook that fits in the coat pocket. Hence, when given the option, many/most doctors will put things in their pockets to leave their hands free.



    Several healthcare organizations does not equal every single health care organization. Notice, I said the Playbook could be successful in the medical setting, not that the Playbook would be the ONLY tablet. Success does not necessarily equal 100% market share.



    Part of the advantage of the Playbook would be that hospitals would not need to do their own integration if they already have BB servers installed. Supposedly the Playbook is ready to go once one turns it on. This lowers the cost to the hospital.
  • Reply 126 of 132
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    Clipboards = paper = standard size of 8.5 x 11. Until the advent of tablet computers, there was not much in the way of an alternative to paper. Also, if you notice, most doctors carry a pocket version of the PDR and a small flip style notebook that fits in the coat pocket. Hence, when given the option, many/most doctors will put things in their pockets to leave their hands free.



    Several healthcare organizations does not equal every single health care organization. Notice, I said the Playbook could be successful in the medical setting, not that the Playbook would be the ONLY tablet. Success does not necessarily equal 100% market share.



    Part of the advantage of the Playbook would be that hospitals would not need to do their own integration if they already have BB servers installed. Supposedly the Playbook is ready to go once one turns it on. This lowers the cost to the hospital.



    No I don't notice that about Doctors. And the decades of paper have created a certain comfort with the format. So unless somebody can come up with a compelling way to talk people into believing smaller and lower resolution is better for medical imagery, or form reading/input the concept you seem to want won't even be DOA, it just won't be.
  • Reply 127 of 132
    grkinggrking Posts: 533member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    No I don't notice that about Doctors. And the decades of paper have created a certain comfort with the format. So unless somebody can come up with a compelling way to talk people into believing smaller and lower resolution is better for medical imagery, or form reading/input the concept you seem to want won't even be DOA, it just won't be.



    First off, where did I ever mention medical imagery? I mentioned document transfer - hence paper records and charts. The Kindle and other e-readers seem to do just fine on the smaller screen. So, I guess millions of people using e-readers must be wrong, and your vastly superior and omniscient intellect must be correct.



    Second, my area of research is MRI and fMRI in drug abusers. You can read images just fine on smaller screens.



    But, you do not have to take my word for it, as it appears that the Playbook will get the eUnity Imaging App, which allows for the streaming of medical images.



    http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Health-Care...cation-689386/



    so apparently, I am not the only that thinks the idea is viable, but again, your superior intellect must know all and be correct.
  • Reply 128 of 132
    nhtnht Posts: 4,522member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    Clipboards = paper = standard size of 8.5 x 11. Until the advent of tablet computers, there was not much in the way of an alternative to paper. Also, if you notice, most doctors carry a pocket version of the PDR and a small flip style notebook that fits in the coat pocket.



    I'd have thought most docs had moved to Epocrates or something by now vs a pocket pdr. You can get it on pretty much any smartphone.



    Quote:

    Hence, when given the option, many/most doctors will put things in their pockets to leave their hands free.



    Well yeah...but the iPad fits too. Probably a little awkwardly once you put it into a case...you pretty much have to have one for the environment. Preferably a case you can easily sterilize.



    Quote:

    Part of the advantage of the Playbook would be that hospitals would not need to do their own integration if they already have BB servers installed. Supposedly the Playbook is ready to go once one turns it on. This lowers the cost to the hospital.



    BB servers have zip to do with the back end EMR/EDIS as far as I know. The key to a tablet's success in the medical arena will be software support by the various vendors...not how long it takes for IT to configure.
  • Reply 129 of 132
    grkinggrking Posts: 533member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nht View Post


    I'd have thought most docs had moved to Epocrates or something by now vs a pocket pdr. You can get it on pretty much any smartphone.



    The younger ones yes, but the older guys are traditionalists



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nht View Post


    Well yeah...but the iPad fits too. Probably a little awkwardly once you put it into a case...you pretty much have to have one for the environment. Preferably a case you can easily sterilize.



    Unfortunately, the iPad does not fit easily into a standard pocket - in the sense of easy in and out, and the weight is a bit of an issue.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nht View Post


    BB servers have zip to do with the back end EMR/EDIS as far as I know. The key to a tablet's success in the medical arena will be software support by the various vendors...not how long it takes for IT to configure.



    You may be right, I was just referring to the security aspects of data transfer for HIPAA regulations.
  • Reply 130 of 132
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    First off, where did I ever mention medical imagery? I mentioned document transfer - hence paper records and charts. The Kindle and other e-readers seem to do just fine on the smaller screen. So, I guess millions of people using e-readers must be wrong, and your vastly superior and omniscient intellect must be correct.



    You didn't mention medical imagery, and that was a critical omission on your part. The ability to take imagery directly to a patient without specialized hardware is one of the primary reasons two of the organizations I know of are doing the iPad work.





    Quote:

    Second, my area of research is MRI and fMRI in drug abusers. You can read images just fine on smaller screens.



    I disagree, and that comes from conversations with the guy that developed (and owns, as in his work + hired talent to generate them) most of the patents on the imagery processing for those machines.



    Quote:

    But, you do not have to take my word for it, as it appears that the Playbook will get the eUnity Imaging App, which allows for the streaming of medical images.



    http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Health-Care...cation-689386/



    so apparently, I am not the only that thinks the idea is viable, but again, your superior intellect must know all and be correct.



    Well, just because something is made available, doesn't mean it will be successful. The Edsel was a car, available to the general public all the way until it was killed. The Galaxy Tab is available and getting killed so badly in reviews it will be non-viable pretty quickly.



    My points on image size and the Gizmodo evisceration of the 7" Galaxy Tab overall usability in the 7" form factor (for pretty much the same reasons) paint a awfully bleak picture for the probability of success for the PlayBook in anything that requires imagery unless it is impossible to get such imagery on an iPad. And we know that isn't the case.
  • Reply 131 of 132
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    Clipboards = paper = standard size of 8.5 x 11. Until the advent of tablet computers, there was not much in the way of an alternative to paper. Also, if you notice, most doctors carry a pocket version of the PDR and a small flip style notebook that fits in the coat pocket.



    So the only reason the clipboard size has endured is because "there's no alternative to paper" except, apparently, for smaller sized paper.



    Quote:

    Hence, when given the option, many/most doctors will put things in their pockets to leave their hands free.



    If smaller sized flip style notebooks that fit in a pocket are preferable, why does the clipboard not just endure, but remain the de facto standard? Doctors clearly have the option, small notebooks are available, yet the clipboard is ubiquitous.
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