Netflix: Apple TV streaming more movies than iPad

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Within Netflix earnings release, the company noted that Apple TV's support for its Watch Instantly video streaming has already passed up iPad users in viewing hours.



The revelation comes as somewhat of a surprise, given that Apple has now sold over 15 million iPads, while Apple TVs capable of playing Netflix have just recently sold over a million units. The previous generation of Apple TV first launched in 2007, but doesn't stream Netflix content.



The capability to play content from Netflix debuted last September with the new iOS Apple TV, making it less than four months old. In contrast, the service has been available on iPad since April.



Apple TV connects to user's HDTVs directly, making it easier to watch hours of content without the potential for interruption, while iPad users are more likely to check their mail, play a game, or have their device commandeered by a spouse or child before they can finish a full length movie.



Netflix noted that iPad use is "also-growing," and that its iPhone app is also "very popular," although the most popular devices for using its service were identified as being ones with "large installed bases," specifically Windows PC and Macs, the Sony PS3, Microsoft Xbox 360, and Nintendo Wii.







Netflix hasn't given up on Google TV



Apart from built in support for Netflix, Flickr and its own MobileMe, Apple doesn't yet support the capability to add third party apps to Apple TV. The company identified Google TV and Internet connected BluRay players and smart TVs as "big growth categories," noting that while Google's efforts have "not yet gone mainstream," the concept "is powerful."



On the subject of TV devices using Android or Chrome OS, Netflix added that "we?re confident that they will be very successful, and we are investing in our Google TV application."



So far, Google TV has been a poorly managed disaster that consumers don't seem to see the value in, but Apple's own TV product also took years to gain adoption.



Jobs on Smart TVs



Last summer, Apple's chief executive Steve Jobs responded to a question about the future of smart TV by saying it was a difficult problem to solve because cable companies "give everybody a step top box for free, or for $10 per month. That pretty much squashes any opportunity for innovation, because nobody's willing to buy a set top box."



At the time Jobs quipped, "Ask Tivo, ask Replay TV, ask Roku, ask Vudu, ask us, ask Google in a few months," challenging the wild exuberance then supporting Google's newly released plans to take over the living room with Android-based Google TV devices.



Jobs has long referred to Apple TV as a "hobby," and stated that the market for smart TVs is "not a problem with technology, not a problem with vision, it's a fundamental go to market problem."



Cable operators offer a "balkanized" global network of different standards and different government approvals needed to act in the role of a broadcaster. "I'm sure smarter people than us will figure this out, but that's why we say Apple TV a hobby; that's why we use that phrase," Jobs said.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 56
    So basically this means people prefer to watch movies on something connected to their TV, instead of on their lap? Bravo!
  • Reply 2 of 56
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,152member
    I love Apple TV. I bought it and thought I will return it if I don't like it. Now we are hooked. Netflix, AirPlay, and iTunes streaming are most used feature (in that order).
  • Reply 3 of 56
    I'm pretty sure that it wasn't Steve Jobs who described ATV as a hobby.
  • Reply 4 of 56
    irelandireland Posts: 17,491member
    How many third party apps does Apple TV have?



    1 = Netflix



    When people turn on their iPad there are a few hundred thousand more distractions.
  • Reply 5 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post


    I love Apple TV. I bought it and thought I will return it if I don't like it. Now we are hooked. Netflix, AirPlay, and iTunes streaming are most used feature (in that order).



    I was planning on returning mine if it sucked but now my family is hooked. We love it!. ATV is perfect for Netflix!
  • Reply 6 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Artist2170 View Post


    I was planning on returning mine if it sucked but now my family is hooked. We love it!. ATV is perfect for Netflix!



    As soon as they add support for Hulu Plus, I'll be jumping on the bandwagon.

    It's got tons of potential.
  • Reply 7 of 56
    "The revelation comes as somewhat of a surprise, given that Apple has now sold over 15 million iPads, while Apple TV has sold in the low millions." I'm not sure why the AppleInsider author Daniel Eran Dilger is somewhat surprised at this revelation when a vast number of iPads have been sold around the world where Netflix is unavailable. Sometimes these authors spout phrases that are nonsensical.
  • Reply 8 of 56
    I have 2 ATV's - The older one upstairs (160 gig hard drive) and now the new one hooked to the downstairs big screen. The new one has fantastic streaming abilities! iPads as a remote are amazing - I also like the older one with built-in hard drive . . . Even when computers and TV are off downstairs, I can play content synced onto the hard drive in the bedroom - In my opinion, ATV has a bright future - Go Apple!
  • Reply 9 of 56
    antkm1antkm1 Posts: 1,441member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    How many third party apps does Apple TV have?



    1 = Netflix



    When people turn on their iPad there are a few hundred thousand more distractions.



    Uhm, it's more than 1. Flicker, YouTube and netflix.
  • Reply 10 of 56
    irelandireland Posts: 17,491member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JamesJpn View Post


    "The revelation comes as somewhat of a surprise, given that Apple has now sold over 15 million iPads, while Apple TV has sold in the low millions." I'm not sure why the AppleInsider author Daniel Eran Dilger is somewhat surprised at this revelation when a vast number of iPads have been sold around the world where Netflix is unavailable. Sometimes these authors spout phrases that are nonsensical.



    And you're American. Well played.
  • Reply 11 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gregquinn View Post


    I'm pretty sure that it wasn't Steve Jobs who described ATV as a hobby.



    Yes, it was.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Jobs concluded by saying "I'm sure smarter people than us will figure this out, but that's why we say Apple TV a hobby; that's why we use that phrase."







  • Reply 12 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jacob1varghese View Post


    As soon as they add support for Hulu Plus, I'll be jumping on the bandwagon.

    It's got tons of potential.





    I feel the same way, so I contacted Hulu. They said they were "working on it" and "in communication with Apple".



    Not sure why it's taking so long, there must be some reason why it hasn't happened yet.....
  • Reply 13 of 56
    Four peeves with Netflix.



    I do find problematic Netflix's lack of ability to allow the movie to be partially downloaded prior to watching. Given that it appears to be a pure streaming service, sometimes, this leads to stuttering (if that's the right word) and freeze-ups. Often happens on Friday nights where I live. I guess a lot of people are online then.



    Two, there seems to be no option to fast forward (or rewind).



    Three, unlike Youtube, there's no airplay option from the iPad or iPhone.



    The final small peeve: rather limited choices for streaming (most are still available only as DVDs by mail).



    So far, it's not too bad for $7.99/mo. If these don't improve soon though, I'll probably drop it.
  • Reply 14 of 56
    It's a surprise that more people want to watch Netflix content on their large TVs rather than on their smallish iPad? Doesn't surprise me one bit. While the stupid analysts at IDC/Gartner are creating this trumped up "media tablet" moniker, it's a different kind of "media" IMO. Smallish content is what these guys do best - not 43 minute TV shows much less 2 hour movies. Sure, they can view that content, and it's great that they can, but I doubt the iPad is the primary vehicle for viewing that kind of content.



    Netflix did it right - put streaming into devices that are in the home theater - blueray/dvd players, tv's, etc. That's where people want to watch their content.



    Apple should let Netflix sign a few more streaming deals with the studios/publishers, then buy them. Then they couldn't stonewall Apple any more like they're doing now. iTunes would be streaming and renting (and subscribing) a lot more video content if the studios/publishers would work with Apple.
  • Reply 15 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Three, unlike Youtube, there's no airplay option from the iPad or iPhone.



    The Youtube app on both the ATV and iPad/iPhone are controlled by Apple so they could add airplay to the iPad/iPhone version. The Netflix app on iOS isn't Apple's app, and developers are just now getting access to Airplay APIs, so until Apple ships iOS 4.3 (or whatever the # will be) Netflix can't do Airplay.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    The final small peeve: rather limited choices for streaming (most are still available only as DVDs by mail).



    Complain to the studios/distributors - they're the ones that keep Netflix from streaming more content. It's the same problem Apple has - getting those guys to allow streaming for a reasonable cost is a huge time sink. Netflix is a bit ahead of the curve on this.
  • Reply 16 of 56
    elrothelroth Posts: 1,201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Katonah View Post


    I feel the same way, so I contacted Hulu. They said they were "working on it" and "in communication with Apple".



    Not sure why it's taking so long, there must be some reason why it hasn't happened yet.....



    Maybe it has to do with Comcast buying out NBC (and Hulu), and Comcast not wanting competition for its streaming video. They may cripple Hulu just enough so the FCC won't fine them, but Hulu won't be as good as it could be.
  • Reply 17 of 56
    I like the Apple TV, but like the Airplay option with iPad even more. The iPad is the ideal interface to find what I want to watch while sitting on the couch...and then just hit Airplay. I wonder if Netflix, ABC, etc. will incorporate this feature into their Apps after the next IOS release.
  • Reply 18 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bazaarsoft View Post


    The Youtube app on both the ATV and iPad/iPhone are controlled by Apple so they could add airplay to the iPad/iPhone version. The Netflix app on iOS isn't Apple's app, and developers are just now getting access to Airplay APIs, so until Apple ships iOS 4.3 (or whatever the # will be) Netflix can't do Airplay.







    Complain to the studios/distributors - they're the ones that keep Netflix from streaming more content. It's the same problem Apple has - getting those guys to allow streaming for a reasonable cost is a huge time sink. Netflix is a bit ahead of the curve on this.



    OK. What about peeves 1 and 2?
  • Reply 19 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bazaarsoft View Post


    Netflix is a bit ahead of the curve on this.



    Can you elaborate. For instance, I can rent the third of the Millennium Trilogy, or, say, RED, as of today on iTunes. Neither seems to be available for streaming on Netflix when I just checked.



    In what way is Netflix ahead of the curve?
  • Reply 20 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bazaarsoft View Post


    The Youtube app on both the ATV and iPad/iPhone are controlled by Apple so they could add airplay to the iPad/iPhone version. The Netflix app on iOS isn't Apple's app, and developers are just now getting access to Airplay APIs, so until Apple ships iOS 4.3 (or whatever the # will be) Netflix can't do Airplay.







    Complain to the studios/distributors - they're the ones that keep Netflix from streaming more content. It's the same problem Apple has - getting those guys to allow streaming for a reasonable cost is a huge time sink. Netflix is a bit ahead of the curve on this.



    The irritating irony here is that If I wanted to, I could easily steal DVDs sent to my house (with handbrake and the 15 year old technology of DVD burning), yet streaming is much harder for an amateur like myself to steal (if not impossible) ... so what is the hold-up?



    I pay ~90 a month for cable internet and I only watch about 2 shows (plus sports, which I would give up) - the wife wants to watch other channels. I'd gladly pay double my nextflix subscription cost to get more movies and current shows (even if they were a month lagged behind or something)
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