Rumor: Apple testing new MacBook Air powered by same A5 processor as iPad 2

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rickertb View Post


    I've you have a common sense you know this is crao.



    Apple just finished a 5 year long transitions period when snow leopard was released!



    Yes, first they transitioned from 68k to PowerPC, then to a completely new OS built from the ground up, then some people would have us believe Apple would transition to Intel (I'll believe that when I see it!), and now they would switch to ARM?



    Anyone knows that transitioning an OS like Mac OS X to a different processor is completely impossible! I mean, all the applications would have to be rewritten! And there's no way the OS could emulate the old processor to run old apps! It's not like you can just look up the translation on some Rosetta stone...
  • Reply 42 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fryke View Post


    Since I mainly use my MBA 11" for writing (TextEdit even!), I'd welcome 3-4 hours more battery power. I'd take that any day. And it's not like anyone's talking about Mac Pros with ARM chips currently, although even there: Why not use 24 A6 or A7 chips instead of two Xeons?



    Or they could just design a new ARM processor with a focus on desktop/laptop performance. ARM is currently limited to portable devices because nobody bothered to make a desktop version. That does not mean it's impossible. There used to be desktop computers with ARM processors that outperformed pretty much every other computer out there (Archimedes), but they lost the marketing war. They could be back in an instant if Apple wishes it so.
  • Reply 43 of 93
    successsuccess Posts: 1,040member
    I'll be buying a new laptop for Logic Pro and some graphic design work. Is there any difference in processing power between the current and/or upcoming MBA and current MBP? About the same? I'm hoping the new MBA has a backlit keyboard at least.
  • Reply 44 of 93
    hittrj01hittrj01 Posts: 753member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beeman60 View Post


    I bet we see a new iOS device - macbook air form factor, perhaps without, but most likely with -> a touchscreen. Makes sense on some level doesn't it? I could see uses for it. Small, light, keyboard, wifi access. A highly mobile second system for a house.



    For some needs, A5 level performance is fine.



    What you describe sounds almost identical to an iPad to me, minus the physical keyboard, which can be obtained if you absolutely must have it. I don't think there is any need to meld the two together, at least not yet.
  • Reply 45 of 93
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,546member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by must View Post


    Just like hybrid cars, Apple could introduce a hybrid MBA, where all web browsing etc. could be done automagically with the onbard ARM chip, saving power. Once you open photoshop, the MBA could fire up the intel chip...



    My thoughts too on the dual CPUs, it's how my i7 MBP deals with graphics now. The hybrid concept could be taken even deeper with a touch screen added on the Air for iOS use. Although the screen idea would be a Frankenbox I guess and not Apple's MO.
  • Reply 46 of 93
    ksecksec Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dlux View Post


    I think that right there is enough to discredit the rumor. Thunderbolt is welded to Intel's x86 chipset.



    What makes you think Thunderbolt is welded to Intel Chipset? Which is completely untrue.



    Quote:

    Just like hybrid cars, Apple could introduce a hybrid MBA, where all web browsing etc. could be done automagically with the onbard ARM chip, saving power. Once you open photoshop, the MBA could fire up the intel chip...



    I used to think about that too. But it is easier said then done. Of coz Apple could find a way around it. But the effort of solving that would properly be better spent at a full transition.



    Quote:

    That doesnt mean Apple havent build a ARM prototype yet but I think going back to SoC with 512 meg of ram is not feasible for running actual MacOS X software



    There are nothing to stop apple having more RAM outside SoC.



    Quote:

    Also, I wonder if people are conflating "64 bit" with a performance benchmark. The 64bit ARM chips will still pale beside the power of intel's Core2 chips.



    The Current Cortex A9 aren't that far away from C2D. Taking into account it is made with LP Node, less software optimization, designed with lower power in mind, etc. It properly still wont match C2D if it was running without those limitation, but there is A15 to further close the gap.



    And apart from encoding video and gaming, when was the last time you maxed out your Dual Core CPU??
  • Reply 47 of 93
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,546member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by success View Post


    I'll be buying a new laptop for Logic Pro and some graphic design work. Is there any difference in processing power between the current and/or upcoming MBA and current MBP? About the same? I'm hoping the new MBA has a backlit keyboard at least.



    I have moved much of my Final Cut Studio work from my 8 Core Mac Pro to my MBP i7 and it is not too shabby. I tried on a Core 2 Duo and it sucked. I know Logic Pro isn't quite as CPU hogging as HD video but it can get up there. So I too am interested in the real power behind the new CPUs destined for the MBA and will they be up to heavy lifting or just intended for the average user.
  • Reply 48 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    Just hope the folks at Intel take this seriously and come up with an even better processor for the next MBA!



    Are you kidding or too stupid?

    a better processor for that obsolete Core 2 Duo is already out since what....months ago at the minimum. Maybe next time ask Apple not to sell obsolete 4+ years old hardware as new.
  • Reply 49 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by michelcolman View Post


    Or they could just design a new ARM processor with a focus on desktop/laptop performance. ARM is currently limited to portable devices because nobody bothered to make a desktop version. That does not mean it's impossible. There used to be desktop computers with ARM processors that outperformed pretty much every other computer out there (Archimedes), but they lost the marketing war. They could be back in an instant if Apple wishes it so.



    of course, they can come with one but Sandy Bridge would spank that monstrousity from Earth to Jupiter and back...and the TDP for that ARM CPU would be quite horrible.
  • Reply 50 of 93
    esummersesummers Posts: 953member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by saarek View Post


    Not so sure why people are so against this, for a machine like the MacBook Air a custom designed chip and board would be a real benefit, think of the benefits that such control could give to Apple.



    I doubt Apple would stop using Intel chips in the bulk of their computer line up.



    Besides, we have Universal applications on our Mac's, no reason why overtime they could not support the Arm architecture.



    Yeah. If they have another Rosetta to make the transition smoother, there is no reason they couldn't do this. Just like with the Intel switch, they wouldn't need to give developers very much notice. As with the Intel switch, you can expect Microsoft and Adobe to take a long time to switch there build system over to the the architecture.



    I doubt that they will actually use the A5, but they are getting close enough to desktop class chips to make the switch in the next couple years.
  • Reply 51 of 93
    successsuccess Posts: 1,040member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    I have moved much of my Final Cut Studio work from my 8 Core Mac Pro to my MBP i7 and it is not too shabby. I tried on a Core 2 Duo and it sucked. I know Logic Pro isn't quite as CPU hogging as HD video but it can get up there. So I too am interested in the real power behind the new CPUs destined for the MBA and will they be up to heavy lifting or just intended for the average user.



    Yeah the current MBPs are i7. The MBAs currently use C2D. It's interesting that you say they suck because people have been doing video/audio on 15" and 17" MBPs for ten years. You can barely compare those processors with the processors in iPhone's and iPads now lol. Why did a brand new CD2 suck for you?
  • Reply 52 of 93
    xsamplexxsamplex Posts: 214member
    Hmm. Suppose you had a netbook type device with a simpler interface that you could retail for $500. Would it sell? Why not? Would this be an appropriate and virus-resistant devices that might work well in schools or in developing nations? Don't see why not. Hell, my daughter has an XO, so it's not like these simplified beasts don't have some potential and don't arouse some interest.



    Or maybe it's all made up...
  • Reply 53 of 93
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,546member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by success View Post


    Yeah the current MBPs are i7. The MBAs currently use C2D. It's interesting that you say they suck because people have been doing video/audio on 15" and 17" MBPs for ten years. You can barely compare those processors with the processors in iPhone's and iPads now lol. Why did a brand new CD2 suck for you?



    Just trying to offer you some help, didn't mean to offend you. My observations are simply because of comparisons in rendering times to an 8 Core Mac Pro which was my standard experience. The i7 (I never tried an i5) was pretty amazing whereas the C2D was very slow in comparison. This was last year when I bought and C2D was standard in MBPs. Of course people can use C2Ds, heck I created two years worth of TV shows for ESPN on a Power Mac (OK it wasn't HD then lol) ... it's aways a matter of perspective.
  • Reply 54 of 93
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,527member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    I have moved much of my Final Cut Studio work from my 8 Core Mac Pro to my MBP i7 and it is not too shabby. I tried on a Core 2 Duo and it sucked. I know Logic Pro isn't quite as CPU hogging as HD video but it can get up there. So I too am interested in the real power behind the new CPUs destined for the MBA and will they be up to heavy lifting or just intended for the average user.



    Ahh...but FCS is old and bloated code that does not take advantage of GCD and OpenCL to exploit multiple CPU and GPU cores.



    I suspect that FCPX, in July, will blow away FCS performance on any Intel chipset -- and might perform well on ARM A5, and above with more RAM.



    I can't wait!
  • Reply 55 of 93
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by success View Post


    Yeah the current MBPs are i7. The MBAs currently use C2D. It's interesting that you say they suck because people have been doing video/audio on 15" and 17" MBPs for ten years. You can barely compare those processors with the processors in iPhone's and iPads now lol. Why did a brand new CD2 suck for you?



    I never really understood why people would want to use a notebook/laptop to do video work. Personally I need a big desk for my camera, decks, external drive, breakout, playback monitor, a nice big mouse pad, tons of cables, a big ergonomic chair, custom keyboard, and at least one 30" cinema display. I look at laptops as portable devices that come with a lot of compromises. Video editing is one of those disciplines, like cad or desktop publishing, that requires an office, in my opinion.
  • Reply 56 of 93
    bigmac2bigmac2 Posts: 639member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by michelcolman View Post


    They actually did sell a Mac with both a 68k and an Intel processor for a while. Didn't really work out. Too expensive, and a PR disaster as the "proof" that Apple had lost the war against Wintel. That was in the Amelio period or even before that, certainly while Steve Jobs was away.



    Huh?



    Those 68k-Intel Mac solution was add-on Dos card that could be buy separately with lots of 3rd party solution, it was not a integrated solution, more like a specialize software driven computer on a board. This is got nothing to do with PR or war. I've got one of those 286 Nubus PC card in my first MacIIx back then.



    When Apple made its first transition from 68k to PPC, they add a 68k emulator in ROM, taking over any 68k code like magic. The first Mac OS running on PPC (MacOS 7.2) didnt got much PPC code in it and even MacOS 9 still contain 68k ASM at some place.



    With MacOS X, you only need to recompile the OS and software to make it run on different architecture just like any Linux or BSD, and Apple development kit allow to produce Universal binary that contain multiple architecture in the same executable. So transitioning MacOS X to ARM would not be a big issue. I'm much more concern of ARM SoC limited unexpendable RAM for being a real desktop contender.
  • Reply 57 of 93
    mbmcavoymbmcavoy Posts: 157member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dlux View Post


    I think that right there is enough to discredit the rumor. Thunderbolt is welded to Intel's x86 chipset.



    This isn't really true. In its current implementation, it is built into a separate chip that bridges industry-standard PCIe interfaces to the Thunderbolt interface. See Intel's info.



    The controller chip is used both in the host (Mac/PC) and in the peripheral device. Certainly, you don't expect a portable hard drive to sport an x86 CPU and chipset, do you?



    There are some ARM chips that have PCIe interfaces. I don't think anyone outside of Apple knows if the A5 includes PCIe, but I think it is plausible. It's also possible that this is really a prototype next-generation "A6" chip, or an engineering/test variant of the A5 with further customization.



    Even more, given Apple's involvement in developing Thunderbolt, perhaps they have licensing that would allow Apple to embed the controller on-die. I think this is less likely, given the lip service to it being an Intel technology, and Intel's hesitancy to allow x86 competitors in their fabs even if it brings in money. However, Intel may have made a deal thinking that Thunderbolt-equipped iOS devices would help spur adoption and push Peripheral and PC makers to compete, not realizing an invasion was coming.



    In the end, I will admit that it's more likely that they used an off-the-shelf shell (including markings) with prototype internals and Display Port. Therefore, it would appear to have Thunderbolt, but in reality would not...
  • Reply 58 of 93
    cwscws Posts: 59member
    Such a move would destroy the ability to run Windows, which for many Mac users is an absolute requirement. This is especially important if Apple intends to continue its push into the enterprise market.
  • Reply 59 of 93
    zunxzunx Posts: 620member
    Hopefully not! Did Apple learn from the PowerPC fiasco? An x86 chip is a must for compatibility across the Mac line and with the windoze world (read Microsoft Office). Or else, it will be the end of the Mac.
  • Reply 60 of 93
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,527member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I never really understood why people would want to use a notebook/laptop to do video work. Personally I need a big desk for my camera, decks, external drive, breakout, playback monitor, a nice big mouse pad, tons of cables, a big ergonomic chair, custom keyboard, and at least one 30" cinema display. I look at laptops as portable devices that come with a lot of compromises. Video editing is one of those disciplines, like cad or desktop publishing, that requires an office, in my opinion.



    Yeah, but...



    There's video editing, then there's video editing.



    I had a recent email exchange, about FCPX, with a friend who's a high-level executive at one of the major networks -- his response (emphasis mine):





    Quote:

    FCP is actually a powerful program but I still think iMovie does the job for most less than 10 minutes productions. Its real value is revealed when using After Effects or Motion, integrated tight in the production. Content is still king and video 'direction' makes a video look pro... not really the 'editing' tools in most cases.



    If you ever travel to NY I would love to give you a tour of some of the edit suites and see how the product is integrated in the workflow. FCP is not the main edit tool, however as a FCP fan you will see its value when connected to graphic virtual sets and tapeless video ingest servers. Pretty amazing in capable hands. But you will also see how simple on & off-line systems (equiv. to iMovie) does the bulk of the work.



    I certainly am not a professional editor -- but I dabble a lot -- and make lots of home movies and short videos of the grandkids soccer games, etc.



    I find I use both FCS and iMovie because each is better suited for some things than the other.



    For example, if you want quick turn around of, say a sports highlight, from an AVCHD camera -- iMovie gives you most all of what you need and very quick turnaround.



    (Now, if iPad iMovie would only recognize those AVCHD cards -- I could whip these out on site.)



    On the other hand, if you are doing story-telling, compositing and more-professional editing then the setup you describe makes sense.





    I do both types of editing for soccer:



    -- the short 1-5 minute highlights posted to YT after the practice or games

    -- the "Team Season" video of 30-60 minutes - given on DVD at the team party
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