Wireless carriers reportedly surprised by Apple's iMessage feature

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple's wireless carrier partners were surprised to learn of Apple's new iOS 5 messaging feature during Monday's WWDC keynote, according to a new report.



iOS 5, which is due out this fall, features a new messaging service, allowing iPad and iPod touch users to "join the conversation." iMessage allows unlimited text messages via Wi-Fi or 3G from one mobile iOS device to another. Built right into the Messages app, users can send text, photos, videos, locations and contacts.



iMessage will also support delivery receipts and option read receipts, along with secure encryption for text messages. Conversations can also be tracked on multiple devices with the same owner.



John Gruber of Daring Fireball reports that "a well-informed little birdie" told him that "Apple?s phone carrier partners around the world found out about iMessages when we did: during today?s keynote." Gruber's industry sources have been reliable in the past.



The news of Apple's iMessage may have been quite the shock for wireless providers, which bring in substantial revenue from SMS plans. Gruber himself noted that he plans to cancel his SMS plan as soon as iMessage is available. The feature will also compete against a number of iOS apps that offer SMS-like functionality.







iMessage has drawn comparisons to Research in Motion's proprietary BlackBerry Messaging service. Though BBM initially served as a draw to the platform, RIM has struggled as consumers have increasingly chosen Apple's iPhone and Google Android in recent years. AT&T chief Ralph de la Vega said last week that AT&T customers have been "choosing other products rather than traditional BlackBerries."



Apple has at times been at odds with the wireless carriers over new features in the iPhone. Late last year, European carriers threatened to discontinue subsidies for the iPhone after reports emerged that Apple was developing an embedded SIM card that would allow customers to shop for wireless service directly from the Apple store.



A subsequent report suggested that Apple had backed down from its plans because of carrier opposition. The France Telecom CEO said last month that Apple had agreed on a compromise to use a smaller card instead of an e-SIM.



In addition to iMessage, iOS 5 packs 200 new user features and 1,500 new APIs, including an all-new Notification Center, a PC-free design and Newsstand, a new way to purchase and organize newspaper and magazine subscriptions. The free software update will be available for iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPad 2, iPad, iPod touch (fourth generation) and iPod touch (third generation) this fall, though some features may not be available on all products.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 144
    I for one will be lowering my SMS plan when iMessage comes around, as I text message back and forth with an exorbitant amount of people who also have iPhones.



    What this also means, if that you should be able to send SMS and MMS messages even when your signal is very low, but WiFi might be present. With that, and the added benefit that videos and photos won't be compressed into ugly super low bitrate versions makes this a win win.



    That is, except for the husbands who fool around on their wives, but also share an Apple ID with them. They won't like this feature one bit.
  • Reply 2 of 144
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    Hmmmm....so if what Gruber says is true (yeah ok), how does he plan to text his "sources" who don't use iOS devices? I thought this was iOS communication only???
  • Reply 3 of 144
    ny3rangerny3ranger Posts: 77member
    Good. They amount of money they get out of it is sick. How is sms any different for data. Shouldnt it be included in data?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Apple's wireless carrier partners were surprised to learn of Apple's new iOS 5 messaging feature during Monday's WWDC keynote, according to a new report.



    iOS 5, which is due out this fall, features a new messaging service, allowing iPad and iPod touch users to "join the conversation." iMessage allows unlimited text messages via Wi-Fi or 3G from one mobile iOS device to another. Built right into the Messages app, users can send text, photos, videos, locations and contacts.



    iMessage will also support delivery receipts and option read receipts, along with secure encryption for text messages. Conversations can also be tracked on multiple devices with the same owner.



    John Gruber of Daring Fireball reports that "a well-informed little birdie" told him that "Apple?s phone carrier partners around the world found out about iMessages when we did: during today?s keynote." Gruber's industry sources have been reliable in the past.



    The news of Apple's iMessage may have been quite the shock for wireless providers, which bring in substantial revenue from SMS plans. Gruber himself noted that he plans to cancel his SMS plan as soon as iMessage is available. The feature will also compete against a number of iOS apps that offer SMS-like functionality.







    iMessage has drawn comparisons to Research in Motion's proprietary BlackBerry Messaging service. Though BBM initially served as a draw to the platform, RIM has struggled as consumers have increasingly chosen Apple's iPhone and Google Android in recent years. AT&T chief Ralph de la Vega said last week that AT&T customers have been "choosing other products rather than traditional BlackBerries."



    Apple has at times been at odds with the wireless carriers over new features in the iPhone. Late last year, European carriers threatened to discontinue subsidies for the iPhone after reports emerged that Apple was developing an embedded SIM card that would allow customers to shop for wireless service directly from the Apple store.



    A subsequent report suggested that Apple had backed down from its plans because of carrier opposition. The France Telecom CEO said last month that Apple had agreed on a compromise to use a smaller card instead of an e-SIM.



    In addition to iMessage, iOS 5 packs 200 new user features and 1,500 new APIs, including an all-new Notification Center, a PC-free design and Newsstand, a new way to purchase and organize newspaper and magazine subscriptions. The free software update will be available for iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPad 2, iPad, iPod touch (fourth generation) and iPod touch (third generation) this fall, though some features may not be available on all products.





  • Reply 4 of 144
    ny3rangerny3ranger Posts: 77member
    Husbands who fool around do not share their apple id's.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OhReallyNow View Post


    I for one will be lowering my SMS plan when iMessage comes around, as I text message back and forth with an exorbitant amount of people who also have iPhones.



    What this also means, if that you should be able to send SMS and MMS messages even when your signal is very low, but WiFi might be present. With that, and the added benefit that videos and photos won't be compressed into ugly super low bitrate versions makes this a win win.



    That is, except for the husbands who fool around on their wives, but also share an Apple ID with them. They won't like this feature one bit.



  • Reply 5 of 144
    dman624dman624 Posts: 2member
    I see it as a good thing for the customers, AT&T has been charging $30 every month for unlimited data, but not including text plans. Now we the customers have a slight edge, like when Netflix came out and blockbuster video was still charging late fees for video return rentals. Pretty quick blockbuster couldn't hold late fees over customers anymore
  • Reply 6 of 144
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    This sounds a lot like FaceTime for text. Which is to say it seems like it's using the same basic server setup and network protocols just with considerably lower bandwidth and packet QoS requirements.



    PS: The only mention of FaceTime appears to be from Schiller when referring to Lion. I would bet Face will be more prominently mentioned — hopefully with open sourcing — in the September event.
  • Reply 7 of 144
    ncmacuserncmacuser Posts: 13member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ny3ranger View Post


    Good. They amount of money they get out of it is sick. How is sms any different for data. Shouldnt it be included in data?



    Actually if I remember my GSM specs correctly, SMS isn't treated as data per say, it's sent on a bearer channel, so really it costs the carriers nothing, MMS maybe different, but a strait txt msg, pure profit. So I don't doubt they aren't happy but it's not all bad, as Apple's message app I would assume will use your data plan..



    They still get their blood, just alittle less...
  • Reply 8 of 144
    wovelwovel Posts: 956member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ny3ranger View Post


    Husbands who fool around do not share their apple id's.



    Apple ID not required
  • Reply 9 of 144
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    This sounds a lot like FaceTime for text. Which is to say it seems like it's using the same basic server setup and network protocols just with considerably lower bandwidth and packet QoS requirements.



    PS: The only mention of FaceTime appears to be from Schiller when referring to Lion. I would bet Face will be more prominently mentioned ? hopefully with open sourcing ? in the September event.



    I am holding out that iMessage will have a button to initiate a Facetime session. Even better, can iMessage provide some form of 'presence' indication so I can know when I can Facetime with others (that is, they have WiFi connectivity, not just 3G connectivity). Or, perhaps get the carriers to allow Facetime over 3G.
  • Reply 10 of 144
    orlandoorlando Posts: 601member
    Apple needs to release an Android client for this. Too many people I know do not have iPhones.
  • Reply 11 of 144
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    Screw the carries. Take spectrum currently used for voice, divert all of it to lte and let us use whatever we please for phone and text messaging be it skype or imessage. Dedicated voice and SMS is dead, the carriers need to adjust to that.
  • Reply 12 of 144
    jpellinojpellino Posts: 613member
    That while the early bird gets the worm, the second mouse gets the cheese.



    Traditional carriers: you've had your fun. Our turn now.
  • Reply 13 of 144
    iMessage will only work if you are trying to text to another iOS device. What if the other device does not have iOS (most do not have iOS)? What if you don't know if the other side has iOS? Wireless Carriers offer a ubiquitous texting service...which is easy to use, always on, and works with any texting device.



    Apple is trying to lock in people to their architecture.....just like Google is. This is starting to get dangerous.
  • Reply 14 of 144
    nuzumunuzumu Posts: 5member
    Wait.... *trying to find sympathy for the wireless carriers*, nope, nothing. Suck it Verizon, AT&T et al.
  • Reply 15 of 144
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by noexpectations View Post


    iMessage will only work if you are trying to text to another iOS device. What if the other device does not have iOS (most do not have iOS)? What if you don't know if the other side has iOS? Wireless Carriers offer a ubiquitous texting service...which is easy to use, always on, and works with any texting device.



    Apple is trying to lock in people to their architecture.....just like Google is. This is starting to get dangerous.



    If you are not an iOS user you don't deserve to get texts from me. Upgrade or be content with boring phone calls
  • Reply 16 of 144
    Gruber also said,



    Quote:

    It also means iPhone users with iPhone-using friends and family no longer need SMS. I?ll cancel my SMS plan as soon as this ships.



    I am an iPhone user with iPhone-using family and friends. But not ALL of them use iPhones. I (and I would think he) would still want the ability to text those people.



    Also, don't forget that iMessages can work over Wi-Fi and bypass the carriers altogether. I don't think they will be THAT upset. Unless Apple makes it an open standard that other phones could use. Now that would be sweet.
  • Reply 17 of 144
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sheff View Post


    Screw the carries. Take spectrum currently used for voice, divert all of it to lte and let us use whatever we please for phone and text messaging be it skype or imessage. Dedicated voice and SMS is dead, the carriers need to adjust to that.



    And you think what you are asking to do is easy? Go ahead and let me know how it goes for you....
  • Reply 18 of 144
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    It's nice to see some real pressure on SMS. I might be able to cancel my SMS plan by the time I need to re-up my subscription, because everybody I regularly message will be on iOS by then.
  • Reply 19 of 144
    oskiooskio Posts: 60member
    DOD for me. I text way too many people who don't use iDevices. Now if your iCloud account gave you a free phone number....now we're talking.
  • Reply 20 of 144
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Orlando View Post


    Apple needs to release an Android client for this. Too many people I know do not have iPhones.



    Oh, yeah. That's happening this side of 1994, that's for sure.



    The idea behind iMessage is that in less than a year, too many people you know won't have anything but iOS devices.



    Listen to me. Apple has given everyone on the planet free infinite texting.



    If that doesn't instantly appeal to the younger scene, I don't know what does.



    Seriously, I really don't know what appeals to kids these days. Do they still text out the wazoo? Then their parents will buy them iOS devices so they don't have to pay out the ear for texting plans. And then they'll get them for themselves so they can message back and forth.



    Free text. Images. Video. FREE. INFINITE. The carriers are dead.
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