City of Cupertino posts further details on Apple mega-campus

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 124
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member
    Looks neat but doesn't really lend itself to future growth. When I worked at MS there were 14,000 employees worldwide not there's closer o 100,000. The same kind of growth will happen to Apple.



    Maybe when this campus is built they'll raze the old 1 Infinite Loop campus and rebuild it to be a sattlelite campus with a similar architecture. The mothership as to have some babies.
  • Reply 62 of 124
    It is the APPTAGON, Like the Pentagon, except it is round.
  • Reply 63 of 124
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


    Looks neat but doesn't really lend itself to future growth. When I worked at MS there were 14,000 employees worldwide not there's closer o 100,000. The same kind of growth will happen to Apple.



    Maybe when this campus is built they'll raze the old 1 Infinite Loop campus and rebuild it to be a sattlelite campus with a similar architecture. The mothership as to have some babies.



    Or, they could build smaller circles inside. like the Pentagon except it is the APPtagon.
  • Reply 64 of 124
    Apple's looking pretty transparent.
  • Reply 65 of 124
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post




    Looks neat but doesn't really lend itself to future growth. When I worked at MS there were 14,000 employees worldwide not there's closer o 100,000. The same kind of growth will happen to Apple.



    Maybe when this campus is built they'll raze the old 1 Infinite Loop campus and rebuild it to be a sattlelite campus with a similar architecture. The mothership as to have some babies.



    I'm pretty sure Apple has thought of that.



    Maybe 12,000 in one building is fine and they don't need to grow in that location... since they pick the best 12,000 employees to put under one roof. Apple might model themselves in efficiency rather than large numbers.



    Apple has enough money to build a campus for 50,000 employees. But they didn't. Apple must have a plan.
  • Reply 66 of 124
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


    Looks neat but doesn't really lend itself to future growth. When I worked at MS there were 14,000 employees worldwide not there's closer o 100,000. The same kind of growth will happen to Apple.



    Maybe when this campus is built they'll raze the old 1 Infinite Loop campus and rebuild it to be a sattlelite campus with a similar architecture. The mothership as to have some babies.



    Apple already have 50k employees, but they don't need all of them to be in Cupertino. A big chunk are retail folks, so are naturally spread around, just like all of MS's consultancy folks. Anyway they've already said that they need this and IL so they won't be tearing IL down and rebuilding anytime soon.
  • Reply 67 of 124
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,903member
  • Reply 68 of 124
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by resnyc View Post


    Why does the Cupertino government have to "approve" of this plan? Is Apple getting a zoning variance? If they buy the property and build within zoning protocols, all they should need is a building permit. Maybe they're de-mapping some streets or something, I dunno.



    Assuming anyone is interested in a serious answer to this question: The land is zoned by the city as Planned Development, which requires discretionary permitting. A portion of the property is zoned residential, which obviously would need to be changed. The discretionary permit by definition requires the preparation of an environmental impact report, by state law. Not that the city is going to much use their discretionary review powers, the City Council having apparently said in advance that what Apple wants, Apple gets. If I lived in Cupertino, I'd be troubled by that attitude.



    Anyway, the expectation that someone could build 2.8 million square feet of office building anywhere in the country on a simple building permit is kind of an odd one. I don't where in the world such a thing would be possible, or desirable.
  • Reply 69 of 124
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,903member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Anyway, the expectation that someone could build 2.8 million square feet of office building anywhere in the country on a simple building permit is kind of an odd one. I don't where in the world such a thing would be possible, or desirable.



    You could probably do that in Houston, which explains a lot about that city.
  • Reply 70 of 124
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Assuming anyone is interested in a serious answer to this question: The land is zoned by the city as Planned Development, which requires discretionary permitting. A portion of the property is zoned residential, which obviously would need to be changed. The discretionary permit by definition requires the preparation of an environmental impact report, by state law. Not that the city is going to much use their discretionary review powers, the City Council having apparently said in advance that what Apple wants, Apple gets. If I lived in Cupertino, I'd be troubled by that attitude.



    Anyway, the expectation that someone could build 2.8 million square feet of office building anywhere in the country on a simple building permit is kind of an odd one. I don't where in the world such a thing would be possible, or desirable.



    GIven how much other states and cities would pay to have Apple's headquarters I think that the council's willingness to let Apple build pretty much whatever it wants on land that has already been built on is pretty minor really.



    http://www.siteselection.com/ssinsid...ive/ti0106.htm



    Chicago paid 63million for 500 jobs.
  • Reply 71 of 124
    tylerk36tylerk36 Posts: 1,037member
    Creative I like that.
  • Reply 72 of 124
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


    Maybe when this campus is built they'll raze the old 1 Infinite Loop campus and rebuild it to be a sattlelite



    No pun intended?
  • Reply 73 of 124
    tylerk36tylerk36 Posts: 1,037member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post


    Spaceship, huh? Is it really acceptable to use references to fiction without specifying the exact work of fiction? I don't believe that there is a consensus as to what a "spaceship" should look like, at least not within our boring majority of non-users of halucinogenic drugs...



    Ok so the perception of such a craft being like the new apple campus building is in the eye of the beholder. But... If you are a person who likes to think in a one mental discipline then you are right. But, if you are one who realize that there are 6 1/2 billion other minds out there who see things from different perspectives then we are all wrong to each other. Basically physics and math are the truth. If you have done any research on so called alien space ships and the physics of such technology then you will see that a round disk shaped object is the favored norm for a anti gravity drive. Liquid metal traveling in a circle and causing a means of travel beyond anything us civilians have to offer. Remember us civilians. Thats the Key. Not us Billionaires but us typical civilians. Anything else is for the future to reveal.
  • Reply 74 of 124
    Here is an aerial view of microsofts campus:



    http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/...os/Red_10x.jpg



    Maybe it was never a platform war because it's really a big game of tic tac to
  • Reply 75 of 124
    aizmovaizmov Posts: 989member
    I'm afraid it won't be big enough. Apple is expanding, they should consider supporting at least 26,000 employees.
  • Reply 76 of 124
    If you look at the PDF that is on the City site, it shows the very open floor plans for the workers. One interesting thing I just thought about. Since there is less space on the inner wall than the outer, how are they going to stuff it full of cubicles? In most office spaces, the walls create a rectangle and you set up tour work areas with the partitions parallel to the walls. Can't do that here! Perhaps you "rotate" the plan so that the partition walls are at a 45 deg angle to the tangent of the outer wall - a diamond pattern from the view of someone looking in the window. This would allow for long rows of the same amount of cubicles with gaps in the corners for common areas. Just a thought. Other ideas?
  • Reply 77 of 124
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MilSF1 View Post


    If you look at the PDF that is on the City site, it shows the very open floor plans for the workers. One interesting thing I just thought about. Since there is less space on the inner wall than the outer, how are they going to stuff it full of cubicles? In most office spaces, the walls create a rectangle and you set up tour work areas with the partitions parallel to the walls. Can't do that here! Perhaps you "rotate" the plan so that the partition walls are at a 45 deg angle to the tangent of the outer wall - a diamond pattern from the view of someone looking in the window. This would allow for long rows of the same amount of cubicles with gaps in the corners for common areas. Just a thought. Other ideas?



    Look at the layout for the underground carpark and then just turn each parking space into 2 cubicles. Done.
  • Reply 78 of 124
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MilSF1 View Post


    If you look at the PDF that is on the City site, it shows the very open floor plans for the workers. One interesting thing I just thought about. Since there is less space on the inner wall than the outer, how are they going to stuff it full of cubicles? In most office spaces, the walls create a rectangle and you set up tour work areas with the partitions parallel to the walls. Can't do that here! Perhaps you "rotate" the plan so that the partition walls are at a 45 deg angle to the tangent of the outer wall - a diamond pattern from the view of someone looking in the window. This would allow for long rows of the same amount of cubicles with gaps in the corners for common areas. Just a thought. Other ideas?



    More importantly, how are they going to handle the change in frame when it's in orbit, rotating and down is towards the rim?
  • Reply 79 of 124
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post


    You could probably do that in Houston, which explains a lot about that city.



    Possibly. Houston has no zoning regulations, but I'm pretty certain they've got building regulations that would make constructing a building of this size something more than a simple building permit.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    GIven how much other states and cities would pay to have Apple's headquarters I think that the council's willingness to let Apple build pretty much whatever it wants on land that has already been built on is pretty minor really.



    http://www.siteselection.com/ssinsid...ive/ti0106.htm



    Chicago paid 63million for 500 jobs.



    Not even slightly minor. Countering with another city's foolishness is hardly evidence to the contrary.
  • Reply 80 of 124
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Not even slightly minor. Countering with another city's foolishness is hardly evidence to the contrary.



    No, it's evidence that Cupertino has to show Apple some love or lose an enormous source of tax revenues. The loss of those revenues would impact Cupertino far more than a new office building, and not for the better.



    If you had actually watched the planning meeting you would remember the part where they ask Steve if he's bothered about the air pollution from the nearby cement plant. Apple is a high value, low polluting employer - any municipality would bend over backwards to win it.
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