Motorola purchase gives Google 17K issued, 7.5K filed patents

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 63
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Asherian View Post


    Apple has targetted the handset makers because it's easier to divide and conquer. Google could only watch as it didn't have many patents in this area.



    Now it's got nearly 25,000 patents spanning 30 years of cell phone development from the inventor of the cell phone. I've no doubt they're going to go after Apple directly now to nullify the patents Apple is using to sue others, or at least openly wage a cold war where no side will want to mess with the other in patents.



    Let's not forget that Microsoft is a big reason for Google's need for defensive patents. They are they ones coming after Android for licensing fees that exceed that of Win Phone 7.
  • Reply 22 of 63
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mac.World View Post


    I'd like to know what patents motorola has relating to smartphones, especially patents that relate to LTE or 4G?.



    Most of Moto's patents are essential and are licensed under FRAND - and will therefore not be very useful as leverage. Apple can easily afford to pay any reasonable license fee. The only ones that will be useful are ones that are not essential or industry standard - and there just aren't that many of those.







    If Google is smart, they will sell the Motorola hardware business and keep the IP. Blackberry OS is struggling, so RIM might have a desire to branch out. RIM still has a sizable cash reserve. Google knows that owning the hardware business puts them in a bad light with other licensees. Google gains a massive PR advantage if RIM starts licensing Android. None of the other Android licensees have the business presence that RIM has.



    But we all know that Google has no respect for anyone's IP but its own and doesn't give a hoot for its licensees, so they may not do that. Instead, they may give the hardware division an advantage over the competition via stronger hardware/software integration. That would be a bad move in the long run.
  • Reply 23 of 63
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    If Google is smart, they will sell the Motorola hardware business and keep the IP. Blackberry OS is struggling, so RIM might have a desire to branch out. RIM still has a sizable cash reserve. Google knows that owning the hardware business puts them in a bad light with other licensees. Google gains a massive PR advantage if RIM starts licensing Android. None of the other Android licensees have the business presence that RIM has.



    But we all know that Google has no respect for anyone's IP but its own and doesn't give a hoot for its licensees, so they may not do that. Instead, they may give the hardware division an advantage over the competition via stronger hardware/software integration. That would be a bad move in the long run.



    Google's Nexus line sold directly from Google already put them in a bad light by showing distinct favoritism. It came with no extra carrier or vendor crapware on the device. They say they will let the vendors bid but I have a feeling they will be controlling the amount of the bid so that Moto wins when it's most advantageous. That said, we might start to see some nice Android devices from Moto tested with versions of Android long before the other vendors get their hands on them.



    As for RiM, moving to and then forking Android doesn't seem like a bad idea. I don't think QNX with Adobe AIR(Flash) for the UI is working out. At least with Android they can get a modern smartphone OS they can alter to meet their needs the way Nokia is presumably altering Windows Phone 7 to suit their needs. It's certainly more likely to get Android apps to run on Android RiM than a virtualization layer under QNX. That said, I don't see RiM doing that. I think they have too much hubris to make the needed changes to save the company at this point.
  • Reply 24 of 63
    orlandoorlando Posts: 601member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shompa View Post


    Instead of buying Android and clone iPhone, wouldn't it have been cheaper to invent an own system? Palm WebOS is a great example.



    There is no way that WebOS doesn't infringe on someone's patents. A smartphone is too complex not too. The only reason no one is looking is that WebOS has not sold enough phones to be considered a threat.
  • Reply 25 of 63
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Orlando View Post


    There is no way that WebOS doesn't infringe on someone's patents. A smartphone is too complex not too. The only reason no one is looking is that WebOS has not sold enough phones to be considered a threat.



    True, but HP does have a huge patent arsenal of its own and existing deep license arrangements with players like MS. They are likely in a less bad situation than Google.
  • Reply 26 of 63
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member
    If nothing else, this should put to rest any notion that Google was not seriously after the Nortel patents or that they are not committed to Android. Only time will tell whether this move turns out to be the right one or too expensive, but you cannot say Larry Page was timid at the switch when he felt cornered.
  • Reply 27 of 63
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    So does that mean that Droid phones are now going to have 'BETA' permanently stamped on the back?
  • Reply 28 of 63
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


    ...or that they are not committed to Android.



    Or maybe that they are going to do a 'Chrome phone'?

    I still think Android has always been a 'holding action' until they can webify (and ad-ify) phones via Chrome.
  • Reply 29 of 63
    rhyderhyde Posts: 294member
    Imagine what the posts would have been like here had Apple bought Motorola Mobility.

    I'm a big Apple fan, but I say "Bravo" to Google. It was expensive, but a coup nonetheless.
  • Reply 30 of 63
    chabigchabig Posts: 641member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub View Post


    That is a lot of money for a "free" OS that is "open."



    Yes it is. And in the Google-Oracle lawsuit, Google tried to argue that Android revenue was zero because they give it away for free and therefore they should not be liable for any penalties. Well if Android generates no revenue for Google, how is Motorola Mobility worth $12.5 billion to them? I think they have just given Oracle's attorneys a big bone.
  • Reply 31 of 63
    It would be a good time for Apple to buy Qualcomm that is if it would sell.
  • Reply 32 of 63
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stargatesg1 View Post


    It would be a good time for Apple to buy Qualcomm that is if it would sell.



    Qualcomm has a much larger valuation than Motorola Mobility but it's an interesting thought. I wish I would have suspected this purchase earlier so I could have profited on today's uptick of 50+%.
  • Reply 33 of 63
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,390member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stargatesg1 View Post


    It would be a good time for Apple to buy Qualcomm that is if it would sell.



    IMO they've all now gathered together enough IP to make business miserable for each other if they all wanted to make ugly. I don't think further ridiculously expensive patent purchases are going to make business sense to Apple or Google and I don't expect to see too many more of them.



    MM as a part of Google may actually settle things down and let everyone concentrate on improvements and features rather than legal firms. . .



    . . . hopefully.
  • Reply 34 of 63
    First Google gave away the OS for free so they could get it on a plethora of competing platforms; thereby saturating the smart phone game with their stank.LOL!

    Now they went and spent big baller money on patents that they will require their OEMs to use or they will have to find another platform(speculating).

    Google is going to have to give not take from their OEMs so they won't,IMHO, be caught up in anti competitive practices.IMHO.

    At the end of the day I have my iphone 4. Sc** this sh**!
  • Reply 35 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    QualcommI wish I would have suspected this purchase earlier so I could have profited on today's uptick of 50+%.



    SAME! I was given a tip for this only three weeks ago. Today I'm annoyed with myself.
  • Reply 36 of 63
    Google's next version of Android code name Ice Cream Sandwich is not open source. Google is trying to compete with apple to create a unique device that will work properly with the hardware and their Android platform
  • Reply 37 of 63
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    IMO they've all now gathered together enough IP to make business miserable for each other if they all wanted to make ugly. I don't think further ridiculously expensive patent purchases are going to make business sense to Apple or Google and I don't expect to see too many more of them.



    MM as a part of Google may actually settle things down and let everyone concentrate on improvements and features rather than legal firms. . .



    . . . hopefully.



    Nope, not even a little. First off I don't expect Apple and Moto to settle, but even if they do Apple will continue to attack HTC, Samsung and friends for the infringements in their customizations to Android which won't be covered by any license from Google.



    Google probably won't mind if Apple does in Sense and T-Wiz, mind you neither would most Android users.
  • Reply 38 of 63
    If you just compare the patent numbers, Google got a better deal from strictly a numbers point of view.



    Google: 12.5B for 25,000 MM patents --> 500,000 per patent

    Rockstar Consortium: 4.5B for 6,000 Nortel patents --> 750,000 per patent



    Of course, the question is, which patents will be worth fighting over ? It would interesting to see a breakdown by tech like 2G, 3G, and LTE.
  • Reply 39 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Most of Moto's patents are essential and are licensed under FRAND - and will therefore not be very useful as leverage. Apple can easily afford to pay any reasonable license fee. The only ones that will be useful are ones that are not essential or industry standard - and there just aren't that many of those.







    If Google is smart, they will sell the Motorola hardware business and keep the IP. Blackberry OS is struggling, so RIM might have a desire to branch out. RIM still has a sizable cash reserve. Google knows that owning the hardware business puts them in a bad light with other licensees. Google gains a massive PR advantage if RIM starts licensing Android. None of the other Android licensees have the business presence that RIM has.



    But we all know that Google has no respect for anyone's IP but its own and doesn't give a hoot for its licensees, so they may not do that. Instead, they may give the hardware division an advantage over the competition via stronger hardware/software integration. That would be a bad move in the long run.



    The problem for Google is that no one wants Moto's hardware business w/o the IP.
  • Reply 40 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iReadAllNuz View Post


    If you just compare the patent numbers, Google got a better deal from strictly a numbers point of view.



    Google: 12.5B for 25,000 MM patents --> 500,000 per patent

    Rockstar Consortium: 4.5B for 6,000 Nortel patents --> 750,000 per patent



    Of course, the question is, which patents will be worth fighting over ? It would interesting to see a breakdown by tech like 2G, 3G, and LTE.



    Nortel's LTE patents are what Moto doesn't have, and with the next auction coming up Google's position for them will be diddly squat and they knew so they bought Moto Mobility instead. Shareholders will be swallowing a bitter pill in a few months and Apple investors will continue to reap the rewards for Apple's expertise technically and legally.



    Google knew it couldn't stop Apple or Microsoft but had to show some effort of being still viable so Moto Mobility was their only option.



    It appears some investors are dumping GOOG stock as it's down > $10/share today.
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