Employee owned iPhone, iPad an "unstoppable train" in the enterprise

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A briefing by Gartner on the management of employee owned devices within corporate circles "affirms the strong opportunity of Apple in the enterprise," a market where 91 percent of the Fortune 500 are testing or deploying iOS devices.



That observation, by RBC Capital Markets analyst Mike Abramsky, was made in response to Gartner's presentation, which estimated that 40 percent of organizations already support employee owned mobile devices.



Gartner called the trend toward "bring your own devices" as an "unstoppable train coming down the tracks," noting that "C-level executives" have opened the door to employee-owned mobile devices and that younger employees "prefer consumer technologies like iPhones and iPads over enterprise-provided alternatives."



On the flip side, organizations are quickly moving to adopt consumer choices as it helps shift Information Technology costs, including hardware, support and service, to users.



iPhone, iPad seeing the most uptake



Gartner reports that Apple's iOS devices are benefiting the most from the trend toward "bring your own devices," pointing out, as Abramsky reports, "Apple's proprietary model is more enterprise-friendly than Android, given its simplicity (two models -- iPhone and iPad), security and manageability features, and platform stability, vs. Android's device fragmentation and missing security features."



Sales, marketing, education, healthcare and retail are seeing the most rapid adoption of consumer selected mobile devices, while the presentation noted that high-security environments are not well suited for "bring your own device" policies, and that poor implementations of the practice could be chaotic for IT departments.



Apple enters the enterprise carried by employees



Apple's Steve Jobs observed several years ago that his company was targeting consumers because as a market, they were open to new options, while the enterprise market sat behind a small number of gatekeeper decision makers that made it very difficult to Apple to sell its products.



Apple has increasingly focused its efforts on mobile devices and has worked to make them attractive to enterprise users, particularly since the release of iOS 2.0, which added support for Exchange Server and other popular corporate protocols.



Apple has since worked to make both iOS and Mac OS X Lion attractive to corporate customers, recently adding new profile-based system management to Lion, for example, as well as contracting with Unisys to sell Macs and iOS devices to corporations and government agencies.



On the other hand, Apple has shifted away from efforts to sell Xserve and Xserve RAID hardware, and has turned its Mac OS X Server product from a general purpose, $1000 per copy server OS into a $50 Mac App Store download.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    Apple iOS devices: An "unstoppable train coming down the tracks"



    Android / webOS / QNX / Bada / WP7 / W8: A massive train wreck.



  • Reply 2 of 34
    iPhone and iPad halo in the huzzie. Next will be tens of thousands of MacBook Airs being brought in by employees. By the time Windows 8 gets to consumers and the enterprise late next year, Apple should have a pretty tight connection with consumers and businesses everywhere.
  • Reply 3 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    Gartner called the trend toward "bring your own devices" as an "unstoppable train coming down the tracks," noting that "C-level executives" have opened the door to employee-owned mobile devices and that younger employees "prefer consumer technologies like iPhones and iPads over enterprise-provided alternatives."




    Who wrote the headline? It misreports what was said.



    The headline may as well have been "Employee Owned Android Phones an 'Unstoppable Train" in the Enterprise".



    That would have been no more inaccurate (and no more accurate) than the AI headline.
  • Reply 4 of 34
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    Who wrote the headline? It misreports what was said.



    The headline may as well have been "Employee Owned Android Phones an 'Unstoppable Train" in the Enterprise".



    That would have been no more inaccurate (and no more accurate) than the AI headline.



    What was said, as you quoted, does at least mention iPad and iPhone?and only iPad and iPhone. So a headline about Android would not be equally accurate.
  • Reply 5 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    What was said, as you quoted, does at least mention iPad and iPhone?and only iPad and iPhone. So a headline about Android would not be equally accurate.



    What was "mentioned" were consumer technologies. But the mere mention does not justify the transposition...Heck. Why am I arguing about this?



    Believe that a mention in a different context makes the headline "more accurate", and that accuracy is a sliding scale, or whatever you wish.
  • Reply 7 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    What was "mentioned" were consumer technologies. But the mere mention does not justify the transposition...



    "..."affirms the strong opportunity of Apple in the enterprise," a market where 91 percent of the Fortune 500 are testing or deploying IOS [note] devices."



    "...younger employees "prefer consumer technologies like iPhones and iPads [note] over enterprise-provided alternatives.""



    "iPhone, iPad [note] seeing the most uptake"



    "Gartner reports that Apple's iOS devices [note] are benefiting the most from the trend toward "bring your own devices," pointing out, as Abramsky reports, "Apple's [note] proprietary model is more enterprise-friendly than Android, given its simplicity (two models -- iPhone and iPad [note] ), security and manageability features, and platform stability, vs. Android's device fragmentation and missing security features.""



    Practically every paragraph mentions and/or quotes people talking about Apple, iOS, the iPhone, or the iPad. How off can the headline be???
  • Reply 8 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    made it very difficult to Apple to sell its products.



    AI typo #3 for today...he means difficult for Apple to sell
  • Reply 9 of 34
    The only thing that makes me nervous about Apple OS and iOS making such headway into the corporate world is that with that market will come big gains in market share. And big gains in market share, combined with a larger corporate world presence, will basically paint a bigger bullseye for hackers and virus writers to take aim at.



    Us Mac users know that the systems aren't any more resilient to virus and attack than Windows, we just aren't targeted as much. That will change if companies start widespread adaptation of iOS and OS Apple devices.
  • Reply 10 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post


    Apple iOS devices: An "unstoppable train coming down the tracks"



    Android / webOS / QNX / Bada / WP7 / W8: A massive train wreck.




    Based on what, exactly? Oh right, based on your fanboisms



    Also, UNICORN OS 16.4 is a train wreck!
  • Reply 11 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Maguro View Post


    AI typo #3 for today...he means difficult for Apple to sell



    thank God you're here. The whole article makes sense now.
  • Reply 12 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sommer182 View Post


    The only thing that makes me nervous about Apple OS and iOS making such headway into the corporate world is that with that market will come big gains in market share. And big gains in market share, combined with a larger corporate world presence, will basically paint a bigger bullseye for hackers and virus writers to take aim at.



    Us Mac users know that the systems aren't any more resilient to virus and attack than Windows, we just aren't targeted as much. That will change if companies start widespread adaptation of iOS and OS Apple devices.



    Us Mac users know that Macs are considerably more resistant to viruses and attacks then windows systems. 10 years and counting without aftermarket products to protect my OSX box. The corporate tag doesn't have anything to do with attacks nor has it been corporate usage that has been driving the industry forward for quite some time.
  • Reply 13 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chronster View Post


    thank God you're here. The whole article makes sense now.



  • Reply 14 of 34
    I know a number of people who still carry a Blackberry and an iPhone.



    My company does not allow me to access my email from my iPhone, nor any internal web sites. I would love to see that change, but I do not see that ever happening.



    So, apparently, the "unstoppable train" does not have a station here
  • Reply 15 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Applecation View Post


    I do not see that ever happening.



    Because your eyes are closed?



    What kind of e-mail does your company use that the iPhone doesn't support?
  • Reply 16 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    What was "mentioned" were consumer technologies. But the mere mention does not justify the transposition...Heck. Why am I arguing about this?



    Because all your posts are critical and argumentative (and frequently slashed to shreds in responses)?
  • Reply 17 of 34
    aquaticaquatic Posts: 5,602member
    Maybe. Apple is allergic to business and enterprise markets, but I hope Cook changes this.
  • Reply 18 of 34
    banchobancho Posts: 1,517member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Because your eyes are closed?



    What kind of e-mail does your company use that the iPhone doesn't support?



    Pneumatic!



    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/51554075...Patent-6474912
  • Reply 19 of 34
    Not precisely a new trend. Back around 1985 I brought my Mac into work every Monday morning and home on Friday night because my employer refused to buy computers at all for management people (and a Mac was completely out of the question). In those days, in most offices, only secretaries typed.
  • Reply 20 of 34
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,860member
    Ultra conservative management and all. About a year and a half ago that all started to change. Shocking I tell you.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Applecation View Post


    I know a number of people who still carry a Blackberry and an iPhone.



    My company does not allow me to access my email from my iPhone, nor any internal web sites. I would love to see that change, but I do not see that ever happening.



    So, apparently, the "unstoppable train" does not have a station here



    Well you can always find a new station.
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