Steve Jobs' cause of death officially listed as respiratory arrest

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palomine View Post


    None of us have stopped to think about the sheer volume of great stuff he produced during the last two years of his life, years that were filled with the kind of pain and torment that would make most of us crumple to the ground.



    Did anyone else see the tribute Jim Cramer gave him on Mad Money? I was surprised. Never liked him, but I had to say he summed up Steve's impact the best of anything I've heard yet.



    Link?
  • Reply 42 of 66
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Unfortunately a cure for cancer is not a marketable consumer product. You can not enjoy a cure for cancer, you will not buy a cure for cancer as an impulse purchase, you only want it when it is too late for you. Consider donating to non profit organizations that are working for a cure even though you may never benefit from it yourself.
  • Reply 43 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post


    He's gone lets leave his memory in peace. He would want us to move on. Cant we just move on. Please.



    He would want us to be one of the crazies, and do something great. Perhaps some of us will.
  • Reply 44 of 66
    We should have had the cure for Cancer by now. But no we need to waste and give money to corrupt charities. If we found a cure for every cancer in the world a lot of business would go bankrupt. We lost a great person and to the technology we have today we should have the CURE for CANCER by now.
  • Reply 45 of 66
    I know of at least five cures for cancer. The AMA and medical institutions don't want these public. The FDA is trying to get vitamins classified as drugs so that people can't get them and cure their own problems. Don't waste your money donating to any charity claiming that they are searching for a cure. They already exist!
  • Reply 46 of 66
    checkout this AWESOME Steve Jobs Tribute Video



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rjRWJUEmJw
  • Reply 47 of 66
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,212member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by munan View Post


    Dilaudid. Not morphine as such.



    Yes, a derivative of morphine. Does the average lay person care?
  • Reply 48 of 66
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,212member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post


    I know of at least five cures for cancer. The AMA and medical institutions don't want these public. The FDA is trying to get vitamins classified as drugs so that people can't get them and cure their own problems. Don't waste your money donating to any charity claiming that they are searching for a cure. They already exist!



    Well, you're on a public forum. How about you enlighten us?
  • Reply 49 of 66
    Woz, Larry Ellison, etc. should organize a Tribute Concert for Steve Jobs.





    Here's a list of artists I think Steve would appreciate.



    Paul McCartney

    Bob Dylan

    U2

    Cold Play

    John Mayer





    what do you guys think????
  • Reply 50 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by acslater017 View Post


    I'm not a doctor, but no I don't think he "suffocated' - merely that he stopped breathing. I don't mean to sound morbid, but it sounds like he was surrounded by his family, who said that he passed away peacefully - rather than a resuscitation-type situation. In addition, they've known since February that he was only his final leg, and for at least a few days beforehand, I think, that it was really imminent. He probably slipped away peacefully and his "respiration arrested. "



    oh okay...as someone who nearly drowned many times and have had instances in my sleep where I couldn't breathe (stuffy nose) it is absolutely terrifying.



    Glad to know he most likely slipped into the unknown peacefully. RIP.
  • Reply 51 of 66
    Even with the tumor and therapy eating him from the inside out he managed to do all that he did!

    He is truly not going to be forgotten!

    I hope he didn't suffer on his way out, but most likely he did not.
  • Reply 52 of 66
    Oh yeah and one more thing...taken too soon
  • Reply 53 of 66
    panupanu Posts: 135member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post


    Does that mean he suffocated? I hope not. That's a horrible way to go :-(



    Dying takes several days or weeks, assuming that death isn't caused by a sudden trauma, such as a gunshot or sudden loss of blood. At any point during the process, the patient can hit a plateau or even get better for a short time, at which time relatives may declare a miracle or think that the patient is getting better. This is difficult for medical personnel, because it is temporary and normal. The dying process is not a straight line.



    At the beginning, the patient begins to lose control over his extremities. He is frustrated that he cannot put on his slippers or button his pajamas, for example. He gradually cares about this less and less, and as he becomes bed-bound, he doesn't care.



    The patient's consciousness becomes shallower. In the beginning, the patient is lucid and "with it" when he is conscious, but he appears to take frequent naps. in the middle, as his consciousness gradually becomes shallower and the "naps" increase, he is only partially conscious and can only get out a few words. Toward the end, he is rarely conscious, if at all, and can only say a few words at a time. The patient may be incoherent and the voice is barely audible. Family members who can't face what's going on will read meaning into them even though others hear nothing. At the very end, the patient appears to be sleeping.



    The person gradually loses interest in food and drink, eventually feeling no discomfort. Toward the end, he won't chew food placed in his mouth and will gently choke if fluid is put in his mouth. At this point, you have to moisten his lips and mouth with a sponge, and that small amount of water may make him cough.



    Toward the end, blood pressure falls as the pulse rises into the range of tachycardia. That means the heart is less and less effective, circulation shuts down from the extremities inward, and organ failure begins. The hands and feet become ice cold to the touch, and depending on what position they are in, may turn purple. This is because of a lack of circulation.



    Toward the end, the patient breathes mechanically, like he's catching his breath. Breathing becomes shallower and shallower until it's hard to hear.



    It's hard to tell when the patient dies, because the only observable change is the lack of breathing. Your mind expects to see a person breathe, so you see the illusion of breathing in your peripheral vision. SInce breathing was so shallow, it takes careful observation and listening to determine that it has stopped.



    I saw three people go through this process in hospice care in my house and another in the ICU. Even though that is only four people, nurses and nurses aides, in the course of telling me what to expect, told me that this is the norm.



    My father instructed the hospice nurse, the nurse's aides, and me to tell him when he was in the final stage of dying, because he wanted to be paying attention when it happened. He was curious what it was like and didn't want to miss it. On the last day of his life, I told him to pay attention as he had instructed me, but he was unconscious. I doubt that he heard.



    Steve Jobs felt no discomfort or pain when he died, mainly because he was not conscious.
  • Reply 54 of 66
    panupanu Posts: 135member
    Hither comes the angel drear,

    Who tells the dying death is near,

    Then ever gentle, ever kind,

    He helps the dying rest to find.

    He gives a balm so strong, so deep,

    That pain is gone, there’s naught but sleep.

    But we who watch the soul depart

    Find grief and sadness in our heart.

    He does not look upon our grief,

    For grief, our love, needs no relief;

    His eyes are on the dying one

    For there is where his work is done,

    And as a skillful surgeon, cuts,

    Removes all sin and fear and such

    Then sews the wound, and wakes the soul

    To newness where all wounds are whole.

    He leads it on a path abroad

    To seek the unseen face of God,

    A journey that is never done

    Till all the final wars are won,

    When all the battles, all the strife,

    The lies, the hate, the stains of life

    And any other painful thing

    Is overcome, and cannot sting.

    Then all the souls who’ve journeyed far

    Behold above a brand new star.

    They see each other, clad with light

    And watch the angels take to flight

    For all the pain and strife did cease

    And nothing’s left but joy and peace.



    The Angel of Death, by the Rev. Kenneth W. Collins
  • Reply 55 of 66
    jasenj1jasenj1 Posts: 923member
    Death comes for us all. But modern society has pushed dying to the periphery. It is good to occasionally contemplate death and our mortality.



    Rev. 1:17-18
  • Reply 56 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jameskatt2 View Post


    By metastasizing to the spinal column around the upper neck, the tumor could stop him from breathing.



    It goes downhill very quickly when the tumor spreads to the spinal cord.



    Sad.



    It's much more likely that he was given opiate painkillers that made him stop breathing. It's not an uncommon way to go in cancer patients.
  • Reply 57 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Link?



    Linky:



    Cramer's Tribute





    After so many years of bashing the stock down and talking it back up I had no idea what he would say about him at the end. This is a fitting tribute to the man who brought them truckloads of money and ever so much more. It aired the night after he passed away.



    also Rachel Maddow did a good tribute on her show.
  • Reply 58 of 66
    it's absolutely disgusting that he got a liver transplant when he had metastatic cancer. Tens of thousands of pancreatic cancer patients are denied liver transplants every year because they have pancreatic cancer. But Steve Jobs could get a new liver. Because he was Steve Jobs.



    so. dis. gust. ing.
  • Reply 59 of 66
    panupanu Posts: 135member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hymie View Post


    it's absolutely disgusting that he got a liver transplant when he had metastatic cancer. Tens of thousands of pancreatic cancer patients are denied liver transplants every year because they have pancreatic cancer. But Steve Jobs could get a new liver. Because he was Steve Jobs.



    He didn't get the liver in California, and there was no scandal about medical ethics, which means being Steve Jobs was not the reason he got the liver, He got the liver because he was in a state where there wasn't a waiting list and the rules would let him have one.
  • Reply 60 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nklsrnsm View Post


    Psychologically, Mr. Jobs died due to lack of oxygen, but rest assured, he was comfortable when it happened.



    Thanks for the insight. As a healthcare provider, also involved with the care of terminal illness on a somewhat frequent basis, what you wrote was almost assuredly largely accurate, and hopefully will put some of this rampant, inaccurate, and medically specious speculation to rest.
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