UK's chief rabbi meant no criticism of Steve Jobs, uses an iPad & iPhone daily

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
The chief rabbi of the United Kingdom has clarified his earlier comments about Apple and Steve Jobs, noting that while consumerism can be dangerous, products like the iPhone do offer true benefits.



Chief Rabbi Lord Sacks gained attention for comments he made in the presence of the Queen of the Commonwealth realms in which he criticized companies like Apple for contributing to a consumer society. But the rabbi felt his comments were misinterpreted, and a spokesman for the Office of the Chief Rabbi reached out to AppleInsider on Monday to offer a clarification.



"The Chief Rabbi meant no criticism of either Steve Jobs personally or the contribution Apple has made to the development of technology in the 21st century," the office's official statement reads. "He admires both and indeed uses both an iPhone and an iPad on a daily basis. The Chief Rabbi was simply pointing out the potential dangers of consumerism when taken too far."



In his comments, Sacks compared Apple's iPad to a modern day version of Moses' stone tablets which carried the Ten Commandments. He used Apple's "i-product" naming scheme, with devices like the iPhone, iPod and iPad, to criticize "an individualist, egocentric culture."



But the rabbi's comments were intended to be a condemnation of the users of new technology and the individualism they are seen as exhibiting, rather than placing the blame on the products themselves.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    The chief rabbi of the United Kingdom has clarified his earlier comments about Apple and Steve Jobs, noting that while consumerism can be dangerous, products like the iPhone do offer true benefits.




    Looks like his mouth is writing checks that his ass can't cash!



    There are a lot more Apple fans than there are members of his congregation. And when push comes to shove, I bet a bunch of his followers will pick Steve!
  • Reply 2 of 52
    This is a case where people should say what they mean. I think this guy was just looking for a scapegoat for the way society has turned out. People embrace new technology because it benefits them in some way. I think cell phones, and text messages are bringing people closer together than they ever were before. Now people can instantly communicate to others instead of needing to wait to meet the person at some future time.



    I wonder just how marvelous people felt the US Postal system was when it came out. It must have been a great invention way back in the 1700s.
  • Reply 3 of 52
    Sounds more like political-type spin to me.
  • Reply 4 of 52
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    The chief rabbi of the United Kingdom has clarified his earlier comments about Apple and Steve Jobs, noting that while consumerism can be dangerous, products like the iPhone do offer true benefits.



    Chief Rabbi Lord Sacks gained attention for comments he made in the presence of the Queen of the Commonwealth realms in which he criticized companies like Apple for contributing to a consumer society. But the rabbi felt his comments were misinterpreted, and a spokesman for the Office of the Chief Rabbi reached out to AppleInsider on Monday to offer a clarification.



    "The Chief Rabbi meant no criticism of either Steve Jobs personally or the contribution Apple has made to the development of technology in the 21st century," the office's official statement reads. "He admires both and indeed uses both an iPhone and an iPad on a daily basis. The Chief Rabbi was simply pointing out the potential dangers of consumerism when taken too far."



    In his comments, Sacks compared Apple's iPad to a modern day version of Moses' stone tablets which carried the Ten Commandments. He used Apple's "i-product" naming scheme, with devices like the iPhone, iPod and iPad, to criticize "an individualist, egocentric culture."



    But the rabbi's comments were intended to be a condemnation of the users of new technology and the individualism they are seen as exhibiting, rather than placing the blame on the products themselves.



    His comments are as relevant as Christ is to his congregation - file this under "Read once, forgotten immediately".
  • Reply 5 of 52
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,525member
    If the rabbi felt his speech was misinterpreted, why was it a spokesman doing the damage control, rather than the rabbi himself?
  • Reply 6 of 52
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Sacks compared Apple's iPad to a modern day version of Moses' stone tablets which carried the Ten Commandments.



    This makes no sense on any level. Most depictions of the biblical tablets aren't even rectangles.



    Thou shall not have Flash installed

    Thou shall not have a user accessible file system

    Thou shall not have a stylus or a mouse

    Thou shall not Jailbreak thy device

    Thou shall obtain all thy apps from the AppStore

    Thou shall upgrade to the newest device annually

    Thou shall integrate thy data through the cloud

    Thou shall stand in a queue in front of the temple at the Mall

    Thou shall affix an Apple logo to the window of thy car.

    Thou shall not speak the name of Steve Jobs in vain
  • Reply 7 of 52
    In other words he's a hypocrite. Just like most religious zealots.
  • Reply 8 of 52
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,650member
    And god said to Moses:



    Thou shall not use a false tablet and thou shall not become a Fandroid.



    That explains why the rabbi uses the real deal.
  • Reply 9 of 52
    [QUOTE=AppleInsider;1992345]The chief rabbi of the United Kingdom has clarified his earlier comments about Apple and Steve Jobs, noting that while consumerism can be dangerous, products like the iPhone do offer true benefits. [SIC]:



    In his comments, Sacks compared Apple's iPad to a modern day version of Moses' stone tablets which carried the Ten Commandments. He used Apple's "i-product" naming scheme, with devices like the iPhone, iPod and iPad, to criticize "an individualist, egocentric culture."



    Another religious <idiot> who didn't read the right books, lol, and news stories indicating the "i" stood for "internet."



    Oh, and the "i" in Rabbi? Hmmm...... I wonder if Rabbisw is spelled: Rabbi$?



    But what do you expect from a believer in fairy tales.
  • Reply 10 of 52
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,035member
    Wow, glad THAT'S cleared up. Now we can all begin the healing process.
  • Reply 11 of 52
    Which is very dangerous and offers zero benefit. What a douchebag.
  • Reply 12 of 52
    Oh I see, so he just wanted some publicity and decided to pull the "A" card and use the "i" word.



    Maybe this rabbi should reevaluate his own faith.
  • Reply 13 of 52
    I'd like to see the rabbi's comments in their entirety to really understand what meant. Ideally the audio/video would help us get an idea of his tone as well.



    It seems like either oversimplification in his speech or misinterpretation on our behalf, not having been there. I seriously doubt that an iPhone and iPad user literally thinks that "Steve Jobs laid down the consumer culture". (Something that existed way before Apple). I assume he was just using Jobs as an example, with some hyperbole thrown in.



    At least his office issued a clarification instead of sticking to his guns. I'll give him the benefit of the doubt that it's a misunderstanding...
  • Reply 14 of 52
    kerrybkerryb Posts: 270member
    The iPad is a shipping product the 10 commandment tablets were vaporware.
  • Reply 15 of 52
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,612member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "He admires both and indeed uses both an iPhone and an iPad on a daily basis. The Chief Rabbi was simply pointing out the potential dangers of consumerism when taken too far."



    I use both an automobile and motorcycle on a daily basis. I'm simply pointing out the dangers of driving them too far...



    What a d!ck...
  • Reply 16 of 52
    kerrybkerryb Posts: 270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    If the rabbi felt his speech was misinterpreted, why was it a spokesman doing the damage control, rather than the rabbi himself?



    I thought religious leaders spoke for their god? instead a spokesperson speaks for the speakers of god. maybe this whole god thing is not really true?
  • Reply 17 of 52
    kerrybkerryb Posts: 270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    Looks like his mouth is writing checks that his ass can't cash!



    There are a lot more Apple fans than there are members of his congregation. And when push comes to shove, I bet a bunch of his followers will pick Steve!



    Why can't we pick neither?
  • Reply 18 of 52
    The problem is the rabbi got it right. The iPad, iPhone are just entertainment vending machines.
  • Reply 19 of 52
    Poor judgement in using Apple or any other company as an example!!!!
  • Reply 20 of 52
    Looks like Steve threatened to reach down from above and smite him...
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