Adobe Creative Suite 6 out now, Creative Cloud coming May 11

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Adobe announced on Monday that its Creative Suite 6 software collection is available now and its Creative Cloud subscription service will arrive on May 11.

Adobe early Monday issued a press release announcing "immediate availability" of CS6, which includes Photoshop, InDesign, lllustrator, Dreamweaver, Premiere Pro, After Effects and Flash Professional. The San Jose, Calif., software maker officially unveiled CS6 last month, touting new tools for 3D design.

?We announced Creative Cloud and CS6 two weeks ago and these releases have caught the imagination of creatives everywhere,? the release reported David Wadhwani, Adobe's senior vice president, Digital Media Business, as saying. ?Today we're shipping CS6 and look forward to the beginning of an exciting new era as we introduce Creative Cloud later this week.?

Creative Suite 6 contains a total of 14 applications across four suite versions: Adobe Creative Suite 6 Design & Web Premium ($1,899), Adobe Creative Suite 6 Standard Design ($1,299), Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium ($1,899), and Adobe Creative Suite 6 Master Collection ($2,599).

CS6 1


The new Creative Cloud, which is expected to go live on Friday, costs $49.99 per month with an annual membership or $74.99 month to month. Owners of older Creative Suite versions can receive a discount on their first year of subscription. The service includes "access to download and install all CS6 applications, new HTML5 desktop products ? Adobe Muse 1.0 and Adobe Edge preview ? and deep integration with Adobe Touch Apps," according to the release.

New CS6 features highlighted by the company include improved performance with the Adobe Mercury Graphics functionality, enhanced user interfaces and "new science" integrated into its imaging and video apps.

Adobe released a public beta of Photoshop CS6 in March, attracting more than 500,000 downloads in less than a week. AppleInsider first revealed details, such as the new 3D capabilities, of the new Photoshop last October.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    suddenly newtonsuddenly newton Posts: 13,720member


    These are expensive suites...

  • Reply 2 of 34
    stevenpjstevenpj Posts: 7member


    +1 I find it difficult to see how they can charge over £650 for the upgrade when earlier this year Adobe was offering 5.5 upgrades for £350 or thereabouts PLUS a free upgrade to v6.0. Gougers!

  • Reply 3 of 34
    tpf1952tpf1952 Posts: 55member


    If you earn your living using this suite of products, they are tools of the trade. It's part of the cost of doing business. Each update provides more tools, more resources and greater capabilities. These resources help me do my job better and faster. I'm happy to pay for them.

  • Reply 4 of 34
    palegolaspalegolas Posts: 1,271member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    These are expensive suites...



    I think the Creative Cloud annual offer is affordable. Like $600 a year for everything. I think it's much better than the previous pricing.

  • Reply 5 of 34
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,584member
    tpf1952 wrote: »
    If you earn your living using this suite of products, they are tools of the trade. It's part of the cost of doing business. Each update provides more tools, more resources and greater capabilities. These resources help me do my job better and faster. I'm happy to pay for them.

    This company is a total ripoff. I don't care if you do make a living using it. These are costs per seat if you have a couple of employees and the upgrade charges are outrageous.
  • Reply 6 of 34
    sol77sol77 Posts: 203member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post





    This company is a total ripoff. I don't care if you do make a living using it. These are costs per seat if you have a couple of employees and the upgrade charges are outrageous.




    But it's market price, is it not?  I get you - I'd love to have CS6, but when I look at the prices I gasp.  But how reasonable is it for me to expect someone to sell me the product they made at the price I want?  The beauty of the free market is that it requires consent...no one is forced to sell at a given price, nobody is forced to buy at a certain price.  I can understand a "holy crap" reaction, but in a free market (assuming we're talking about a free market and not some socialist dictatorship), isn't it perfectly fine...and not outrageous? I'm glad the anger of some cannot supersede the rights of others to sell their own product as they see fit.  How awful would it be to run a company if you couldn't?

  • Reply 7 of 34
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,558member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sol77 View Post




    But it's market price, is it not?  I get you - I'd love to have CS6, but when I look at the prices I gasp.  But how reasonable is it for me to expect someone to sell me the product they made at the price I want?  The beauty of the free market is that it requires consent...no one is forced to sell at a given price, nobody is forced to buy at a certain price.  I can understand a "holy crap" reaction, but in a free market (assuming we're talking about a free market and not some socialist dictatorship), isn't it perfectly fine...and not outrageous? I'm glad the anger of some cannot supersede the rights of others to sell their own product as they see fit.  How awful would it be to run a company if you couldn't?





    It's not a "free market", it's a monopoly market with network effects, so they charge whatever they want and customers have no choice but to pay it if they are doing graphics work.

  • Reply 8 of 34
    michael scripmichael scrip Posts: 1,912member
    freerange wrote: »
    This company is a total ripoff. I don't care if you do make a living using it. These are costs per seat if you have a couple of employees and the upgrade charges are outrageous.

    If you have a couple employees... and you're using Adobe's software... you're probably making some money, right?

    Like someone said earlier... these are tools of the trade.

    The nice thing is... Creative Cloud comes out to $600 a year.

    I made $500 in one night videoing a dance recital... then spent another night cutting it together and authoring a DVD using Adobe's tools.

    So for me... two evenings plus a couple more hours duplicating and printing those DVDs... and I could have almost paid for Creative Cloud for the rest of the year.

    In other words... a few nights work can pay for a year of software. That's how you need to approach "expensive" professional software like this. If you're not making money with Adobe's tools... you probably don't need them. They still offer Elements.

    I think the pricing of Creative Cloud will bring even more customers to Adobe.

    It's not expensive if you rely on these tools.
  • Reply 9 of 34
    palegolaspalegolas Posts: 1,271member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

    ... The nice thing is... Creative Cloud comes out to $600 a year.

    I made $500 in one night videoing a dance recital...


    Agreed. The new Creative Cloud pricing is reasonable.


    Later this year I read they'll also launch Creative Cloud Team, or whatever the final marketing name will be, with multi user licenses and stuff. I guess it'll be reasonable as well.


     


    I think the monopoly feel is there because there is no real competitor to one of Adobe's apps, namely Photoshop.


    Pixelmator is great, there are a bunch of nice painting apps, but none of them really competes with Photoshop. Most of Adobe's other apps are in strong competition.

  • Reply 10 of 34
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,424member
    tpf1952 wrote: »
    If you earn your living using this suite of products, they are tools of the trade. It's part of the cost of doing business. Each update provides more tools, more resources and greater capabilities. These resources help me do my job better and faster. I'm happy to pay for them.

    Glad it works out for you. I read an interesting article here on the 'Adobe Tax'. One thing that popped: Dreamweaver, quote "A particularly gruesome example is Dreamweaver CS6. This tired old app is receiving its third or fourth bogus “update” in a row from Adobe, for which they would happily exact a $250 upgrade fee from Dreamweaver CS5 users! It appears that for CS6, Adobe has grafted on a few spotty self-serving features (integration with other pay services they offer like Business Catalyst and PhoneGap) without addressing any fundamentals of the app. Indeed, one of their “top new features” is that they’ve updated Live View to so it “uses the latest version of the WebKit rendering engine to provide the ultimate in HTML5 support”. Hilarious! It’s pretty clear they have no interest in updating Dreamweaver’s ancient and obsolete “Design view” or repairing all the broken features and ugliness of the core app. Indeed, all the changes they’ve implemented appear carefully restricted to peripheral aspects of the software that are probably themselves plugins. The fact is there’s nothing new in Dreamweaver CS6 anybody should be paying money for. Rather, Dreamweaver CS6 ought be a free upgrade to existing Dreamweaver licensers, accompanied by an apology."
  • Reply 11 of 34
    technotechno Posts: 676member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    These are expensive suites...



    Seriously! What a bunch of crap dressed up in bells and whistles. The price of the "Creative Cloud" is extreme too. And what a horrible name.

  • Reply 12 of 34
    technotechno Posts: 676member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    Glad it works out for you. I read an interesting article here on the 'Adobe Tax'. One thing that popped: Dreamweaver, quote "A particularly gruesome example is Dreamweaver CS6. This tired old app is receiving its third or fourth bogus “update” in a row from Adobe, for which they would happily exact a $250 upgrade fee from Dreamweaver CS5 users! It appears that for CS6, Adobe has grafted on a few spotty self-serving features (integration with other pay services they offer like Business Catalyst and PhoneGap) without addressing any fundamentals of the app. Indeed, one of their “top new features” is that they’ve updated Live View to so it “uses the latest version of the WebKit rendering engine to provide the ultimate in HTML5 support”. Hilarious! It’s pretty clear they have no interest in updating Dreamweaver’s ancient and obsolete “Design view” or repairing all the broken features and ugliness of the core app. Indeed, all the changes they’ve implemented appear carefully restricted to peripheral aspects of the software that are probably themselves plugins. The fact is there’s nothing new in Dreamweaver CS6 anybody should be paying money for. Rather, Dreamweaver CS6 ought be a free upgrade to existing Dreamweaver licensers, accompanied by an apology."Dream


    With the onslaught of CMS sites, Dreamweaver is becoming an obsolete app anyway. 

  • Reply 13 of 34
    eksodoseksodos Posts: 186member


    CS6 is a tremendous value for content producers. As someone has already pointed out before me, those using these tools usually pay for themselves with a couple days of work in a year. These powerful tools make it possible for you to earn a very good living. If you can't take advantage of these applications to make a very nice return on your investment, you probably shouldn't be looking at Creative Suite applications in the first place. 

  • Reply 14 of 34
    frankiefrankie Posts: 369member


    So they pay some marketing firm several $ million to find out they can make more money screwing customers and charging them monthly fees....why not just make it more affordable so more people will use their products and then make more money by having access to a larger customer base?   Typical business bull___...

  • Reply 15 of 34
    habanerohabanero Posts: 77member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by eksodos View Post


    CS6 is a tremendous value for content producers. As someone has already pointed out before me, those using these tools usually pay for themselves with a couple days of work in a year. These powerful tools make it possible for you to earn a very good living. If you can't take advantage of these applications to make a very nice return on your investment, you probably shouldn't be looking at Creative Suite applications in the first place. 



    Exactly right.


    It's weird that many of the same people who understand when it makes sense to pay a premium $1300 for a MacBook Pro over a $500 Dell laptop don't understand that the same applies to Creative Suite. Sure, you can nit-pick that it doesn't have features X, Y, and Z... but you can do that with MBPs too.

  • Reply 16 of 34
    habanerohabanero Posts: 77member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by techno View Post


    With the onslaught of CMS sites, Dreamweaver is becoming an obsolete app anyway. 



    yeah... 'cause everyone wants a cookie-cutter website done in WordPress....

  • Reply 17 of 34
    bsenkabsenka Posts: 799member


    Calling them "tools of the trade" doesn't justify the price gouge. The tools of most other trades don't cost nearly as much, they don't have to be replaced anywhere near as often, and multiple employees can share the same set of tools if that arrangement is feasible for your workflow.

  • Reply 18 of 34
    rcomeaurcomeau Posts: 27member


    Wat trade are you referring to?


     


    How much is the yearly subscription to SolidWorks? Not $200 I think...


    Our machine shop just spent over $100k on a new 3D printer.


     


    Pro tools cost pro $$. No one is forcing you to use these tools, and if you want to use them and cannot make enough money to cover it, well, maybe you are in the wrong business of maybe you would be happier as an employee somewhere so the boss can worry about the cost of tools.

  • Reply 19 of 34
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,558member


    I see this thread has brought the Adobe shills out in force. Well, it's not the first time they have been so obviously active.

  • Reply 20 of 34
    conrailconrail Posts: 489member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bsenka View Post


    Calling them "tools of the trade" doesn't justify the price gouge. The tools of most other trades don't cost nearly as much, they don't have to be replaced anywhere near as often, and multiple employees can share the same set of tools if that arrangement is feasible for your workflow.



    Autocad is $4000 a seat.


     


    Maya and Smoke are $3500 a seat.


     


    I doubt the people making money with these products complain about the cost.

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