Apple designer Jonathan Ive says current projects are his 'most important' work

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  • Reply 41 of 105
    mj4ev3rmj4ev3r Posts: 99member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post


    No, most companies does not try to do that. That's why Apple is unique.



    Agree!  


     


    Unlike the SJ-infused DNA of prioritizing the USER-experience OVER profit, most companies make gadgets/products with the mind-set of HOW MUCH can we squeeze PROFIT from this product!


     


    SJ was an incurable idealist-cum-hippie, and that was reflected on how he design, build and produce all of his Apple products, which truly makes Apple unique and a stand-out!!


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  • Reply 42 of 105
    malaxmalax Posts: 1,598member

    Quote:


    Still, Ive might not be completely satisfied with Apple's output. When asked about skeuomorphic design features like fake leather texture and stitching in iOS and OS X, he visibly winced in way that the interviewer interpreted as a "gesture of sympathy."



     


    Just this last weekend I watched a session from the 2010 WWDC called "iPad and iPhone User Interface Design" by a couple of the Apple software guys and it was amazing.  It was very insightful and literally inspiring.  They talked specifically about the decisions to use wood texture for the iBooks bookcase and leather (not "fake leather," duh) and stitching for the Notes app, and why the torn paper is there.  Obviously you can disagree with their design choices (as you can with any of Ive's decisions), but the obvious attention to detail and love (no other word for it) that went into those apps and the iOS in general was impressive.  The success of the iPhone and iPad (and thereby Apple) is much more a function of the work of software teams than anyone else.  But of course the other "secret" of Apple is that all the teams work very closely together.  I work at a much smaller company and we have more silos of expertise and independent decision making than Apple.  What I got out of "the book" was Jobs genius in forcing everyone to work together hold each other to the highest standards.  Being an executive at Apple must be harder than most places (since you can't just throw up walls around your own people and projects and be successful on your own terms), but they are doing a lot of things right.

  • Reply 43 of 105
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 18,748member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    That's the thing, he has actually said this before. 


    Also, nothing personal to Sir Ive, he is a great designer but ... he is also a veritable king of platitudes and literally oozes insincerity at every orifice.  


     


    If one takes the time, one can find his ever-so-earnest, superlative, yet completely empty remarks being repeated for every product he's ever created.  


    At least the ones they did video's for. 



     


    What you don't seem to get is the fact that many people -- especially us shareholders -- like it that way. Competitors are reduced to stealing and deconstructing ideas from the finished product rather than work-in-progress. It is a critical component of what keeps Apple ahead of its competitors for at least a couple of years in its development cycle.


     


     


    Too many people in too many companies have loose lips. 

  • Reply 44 of 105
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ILM1997 View Post



    Since Jonathan Ivy's design sense is so acute, he would be a perfect fit for the entire design of Apples products. ... Why not expand Jonathans role to include beautiful software UI design too ?


     


    Given the absolute hatred for skeuomorphic design amongst the tech crowd, people will probably hate me for saying this, but ...


     


    The fact that he doesn't like the skeuomorphism in some of the iOS apps (hinted at in the source article), is actually a sign that he doesn't understand the software design and probably shouldn't have a say in it.  There are very good reasons for what Apple is doing in that regard.  


     


    If he doesn't "get" that, he shouldn't be involved IMO. 

  • Reply 45 of 105
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    ...  the day of his official knighting ceremony ...


     


     


    Gosh, has anyone watched the video of the knighting ceremony? 


     


    I feel sorry for the guy.  


    Knighted by Princess Margaret instead of the Queen, wearing the worst fitting suit I've ever seen, sweating profusely, intensely nervous ... Yikes.  


     


    Poor Jonny!

  • Reply 46 of 105
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    malax wrote: »
    Just this last weekend I watched a session from the 2010 WWDC called "iPad and iPhone User Interface Design" by a couple of the Apple software guys and it was amazing.  It was very insightful and literally inspiring.  They talked specifically about the decisions to use wood texture for the iBooks bookcase and leather (not "fake leather," duh) and stitching for the Notes app, and why the torn paper is there.  Obviously you can disagree with their design choices (as you can with any of Ive's decisions), but the obvious attention to detail and love (no other word for it) that went into those apps and the iOS in general was impressive.

    I cant say I like the way iCal or Address Book looks but There is certainly a need for skeuomorphs in design, especially when dealing with consumer software that are representing physical objects.

    That said, there is definitely a fine line between using ornamental and structural design cues that evoke a comfortable and familiar feeling, and making something tacky and cumbersome.

    While I don't like iCal's look I don't think it's tacky and certainly not cumbersome. Address Book on the order hand I find consumer ably more cumbersome to use.

    At some point the need for archiac familiarity tends to fall away as we no longer need the mental correlation and by retaining it we can progress the usability in new ways. I hope that is sooner rather than later and not like MS still using a floppy disc icon to indicate Save.


    PS: Personally I wish that Address Book and iCal would have the option to be shown in Mail as a side item as I tend to use these apps in conjunction and dislike switching between all three for tasks but I know Ipmy interest here is typical. With ML even Notes and Reminders become separate apps that fill up my Dock with even more clutter.
  • Reply 47 of 105


    Unfortunately, you have only scratched the surface.  This is how Dieter feels about being ripped off:


     


    image


     


    Also:  http://www.businessofdesignonline.com/picasso-good-artists-copy/

  • Reply 48 of 105
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    gazoobee wrote: »
    That's the thing, he has actually said this before. 
    Also, nothing personal to Sir Ive, he is a great designer but ... he is also a veritable king of platitudes and literally oozes insincerity at every orifice.  

    If one takes the time, one can find his ever-so-earnest, superlative, yet completely empty remarks being repeated for every product he's ever created.  
    At least the ones they did video's for. 

    So what are you suggesting? That Apple should hire a second-rate designer who doesn't use platitudes?

    I couldn't care less whether Ive uses platitudes or empty remarks. His job is to create great products - and he does that exceptionally well.

    ilm1997 wrote: »
    Since Jonathan Ivy's design sense is so acute, he would be a perfect fit for the entire design of Apples products. From hardware design to UI design, what is wrapped up in him he would make very successful UI's well into the future that would me so married to the hardware, so intricately related would be a thing of total art.
    So how about it Apple ? Why not expand Jonathans role to include beautiful software UI design too ?
    I really think this is where Apple can continue to excel. Then things like the icons on the Apple TV in its UI could be made more beautiful again.
    Just my 2c.

    What evidence do you have that:
    a. Ive's incredible hardware design skills would translate to software?
    and
    b. That Apple's software group doesn't listen to Ive, anyway?

    I suspect that Apple knows what it's doing a heck of a lot more than you do.
  • Reply 49 of 105
    tjwaltjwal Posts: 404member


    And from Dierter Rams the Braun designer ..


     


    "I have always regarded Apple products – and the kind words Jony Ive has said about me and my work – as a compliment. Without doubt there are few companies in the world that genuinely understand and practise the power of good design in their products and their businesses."

  • Reply 50 of 105
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,471member
    malax wrote: »
    Just this last weekend I watched a session from the 2010 WWDC called "iPad and iPhone User Interface Design" by a couple of the Apple software guys and it was amazing.  It was very insightful and literally inspiring.  They talked specifically about the decisions to use wood texture for the iBooks bookcase and leather (not "fake leather," duh) and stitching for the Notes app, and why the torn paper is there.  Obviously you can disagree with their design choices (as you can with any of Ive's decisions), but the obvious attention to detail and love (no other word for it) that went into those apps and the iOS in general was impressive.  The success of the iPhone and iPad (and thereby Apple) is much more a function of the work of software teams than anyone else.  But of course the other "secret" of Apple is that all the teams work very closely together.  I work at a much smaller company and we have more silos of expertise and independent decision making than Apple.  What I got out of "the book" was Jobs genius in forcing everyone to work together hold each other to the highest standards.  Being an executive at Apple must be harder than most places (since you can't just throw up walls around your own people and projects and be successful on your own terms), but they are doing a lot of things right.

    Thanks for this post. I think it was an irrelevant question on the interviewer's part to raise this in the first place. Ive is responsible for the hardware, not the software, where different rules apply.

    You can play around with eye candy in software—it costs close to nothing once it's designed, and you can always change it. The skeuomorphic stuff in Notes or Calender is there out of a sense of delight, or, as you say, love, and it doesn't hurt a thing to be there. It makes it fun for THE USER to be there. Geeks hate it because they are generally allergic to visual delight. Left-brain people interpret beauty as noise.

    As for hardware, in the Jobs/Ive Zen aesthetic of deep simplicity, there is no room for decoration for its own sake. The delight comes from the absence of waste or any sort of fakery. Because it's material, every curve, recess, bump, or hole has a huge price in manufacturing, not to mention it will be sensed by the user's fingers as dishonest if it doesn't need to be there. Sir Jony probably winced at the question because it didn't need to be asked of him.

    By the way, I happen to like the leather and wood stuff. It's tactile, or on its way to being tactile. It will look great in 3D when we finally get there. That's what they're working on now, come to think of it, and that's why he winced. Just a guess.
  • Reply 51 of 105
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,588member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tune View Post


     


    "We have always been SHAMELESS about stealing great ideas." - Steve Jobs



    You really don't get it, do you. In the context of 'stealing ideas' from a creative stand point, it is a reference to the creative process of learning from your contemporaries and from the masters, and to use their ideas to develop your own and further your work beyond what has come before. It has nothing to do with blatant copying without adding something extraordinary and unique to the table.

  • Reply 52 of 105
    mj4ev3rmj4ev3r Posts: 99member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


     


    Gosh, has anyone watched the video of the knighting ceremony? 


     


    I feel sorry for the guy.  


    Knighted by Princess Margaret instead of the Queen, wearing the worst fitting suit I've ever seen, sweating profusely, intensely nervous ... Yikes.  


     


    Poor Jonny!



    There is nothing poor about Jony!  A humble yet amazingly talented, and accomplished human being!  To be knighted for his  brilliant accomplishments at Apple is just an icing on the cake in his incredibly illustrious career as a world-class and highly-respected designer!


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  • Reply 53 of 105
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,196member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post


    So Ives sagely stating that the best and most important work is what his team is doing today gets extrapolated to mean he's working on a mythical Apple TV?  Please AI, stop making my eyes roll.     



     


    To their credit, AI didn't say he was talking about a TV, just that some folks will make that leap of serious assumption. And they are correct, some folks will. 


     


    as to the whole thing with the Queen, yes he would 'no comment' her. very gently and politely but the Queen, the POTUS etc don't override his contracts to keep his mouth shut. Not that they would probably ask since they understand this notion. 


     


    And I like that he pointed out that Apple doesn't design based on or in reaction to what the other boys are doing. But he also pointed out that he's not the only cook in the kitchen, without directly tossing anyone under the bus in regards to things he doesn't care for. It's not his call or his veto so he has to let it stand even if he doesn't like it. 

  • Reply 54 of 105
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,196member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tune View Post


    "We have always been SHAMELESS about stealing great ideas." - Steve Jobs


     



     


    Trouble is that those other boys aren't just stealing the idea (which in the US has zero copyright protection and limited trademark/patent protection) but the actual expression of the idea (which is totally protectable and protected)


     


    And even when the expression isn't under IP protection it is still rank and obnoxious when the other boys copy it and then claim they are 'innovating' and they should be allowed to do it to give users a choice. Sorry but the choice of buying the iPhone from Apple and what is basically the iPhone from someone else is not really choice, don't pretend it is. 

  • Reply 55 of 105
    haarhaar Posts: 563member
    scotty321 wrote: »
    Thank God one person remains at Apple who can fulfill the legacy of Steve Jobs. Because it sure ain't Tim Cook. Ives is now the soul of Apple.
    keep spouting your made up meme.

    <strong>Tim Cook and Jon Ive are equals...</strong> chick and egg... whats more important?.

    at a certain point you need someone to make the products, and Tim Cook has proven that he can do it.
    if you can not make the product in vast quantities for an equal amount of profit, all is moot.

    you need the idea (ive) egg, but the chicken (tim cook) is needed to make the profit.

    who sets the price?... Tim Cook most likely has more input to that question than Ive does.(Ive creates?, Cook executes? )
  • Reply 56 of 105
    cgjcgj Posts: 276member


    Would Apple like to update their PR Bio page now?


     


    http://www.apple.com/pr/bios/jonathan-ive.html


     


    Congratulations to Sir Jony, very deserving on his part.

  • Reply 57 of 105

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tune View Post


     


     


    iphoneadirectcopyoflgpr.png


     


     


    "We have always been SHAMELESS about stealing great ideas." - Steve Jobs


     



     


    Oh please, the iPhone was a announced only a few months after the Prada appeared. It's not like Apple could have totally redesigned it from something quite different to a Prada-phone knockoff. You're also comparing the Prada-phone to the iPhone 4, not the original iPhone. There's similarity in appearance, but the iPhone wouldn't have looked any different if there never were a Prada-phone.

  • Reply 58 of 105

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bwik View Post


    It would be good to see something new, Jonathan.  It's been years.



     


    “What our products will not speak to is a schedule”.

  • Reply 59 of 105
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,588member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    I cant say I like the way iCal or Address Book looks but There is certainly a need for skeuomorphs in design, especially when dealing with consumer software that are representing physical objects.

    That said, there is definitely a fine line between using ornamental and structural design cues that evoke a comfortable and familiar feeling, and making something tacky and cumbersome.

    While I don't like iCal's look I don't think it's tacky and certainly not cumbersome. Address Book on the order hand I find consumer ably more cumbersome to use.

    At some point the need for archiac familiarity tends to fall away as we no longer need the mental correlation and by retaining it we can progress the usability in new ways. I hope that is sooner rather than later and not like MS still using a floppy disc icon to indicate Save.

    PS: Personally I wish that Address Book and iCal would have the option to be shown in Mail as a side item as I tend to use these apps in conjunction and dislike switching between all three for tasks but I know Ipmy interest here is typical. With ML even Notes and Reminders become separate apps that fill up my Dock with even more clutter.


    Couldn't agree more. iCal doesn't look tacky because it is very well done and it will probably work better on a retina display. But like you, i don't like it and really hate the visual referencing back to 'ye good ol' days'.I wouldn't be surprised if this kind of thing will become more common with the introduction of retina displays. 


     


    But luckily design is in a permanent state of flux and will move on. Luckily also that Apple's designers are of a high calibre and generally can be trusted to come up with something OK at worst. Usability is a different issue and the Address book is not great, though by learning and using a few short-cuts it gets better.


     


    I too, am very ambivalent re the notes, reminders and ical as separate apps. I'd love a single app with different views. Enter everything in one place but view only reminders, notes or calendar items as you choose. Three apps to work with different aspects of the the same concept serves to confuse (me) more than it clarifies.

  • Reply 60 of 105
    povilaspovilas Posts: 473member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tune View Post


    applebraun.jpg


     


    iphoneadirectcopyoflgpr.png


     


     


     


     


     


     


    "We have always been SHAMELESS about stealing great ideas." - Steve Jobs


     



    You know you are one tinfoil hat away from rubber room?

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