Apple television announcement expected to precede launch by 2-6 months

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  • Reply 61 of 86
    technotechno Posts: 704member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Hoss View Post



    Here's a shot in the dark: You won't sell any in Europe. They're kinda preoccupied at the moment. I'd seriously consider putting this thing on hold until things stabilize. Apple should focus on proven products for now.


     


    Or they could release it on their time table and let the fanboys line up to buy it on day one and build the buzz. Let the Europeans drool for a while.



    Seriously though, Apple products seem to still do well regardless of the economic climate.

  • Reply 62 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    Umm....Get your basics straight.  They had to do that for the iPod (which, quite apart from being a first ever of its kind in this arena, was introduced at the time of 2000-01 recession), and with getting carrier agreements around the world for the iPhone/iPad.

    In any event, as with all of its major product introductions, Apple will likely introduce it in the US first, test the waters at home, learn, iron out the bugs, get momentum, and only then venture outside the US. My guess is that Europe will probably not see that product until late 2013 (assuming it's announced in the US in late 2012 and sold starting mid-2013).

    Yes but people had plenty of ready to install content on iPods, CD collections, getting the music industry on board slowly was a luxury they could afford. Yes there had to be carrier agreements but most country like the US have a multitude of networks to deal with. Totally different animal.
  • Reply 63 of 86
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    bmason1270 wrote: »
    Exactly. I just don't see how Apple can eliminate the boxes and provide us with their user experience without controling the content and its distribution. Unless it can work out a cable card deal with the cable companies. But I see no chance of them playing ball and letting Apple control the box.

    The Cable Companies are not going to give up any revenue like VOD or even advertising revenue that gets put on the Cable Box UI.

    Apple could go a Tivo like model but you still have to deal with the cable box.

    No doubt the TV will be slick and I'll want one, but there is zero chance it replaces any current boxes.

    In my Dream World, Apple buys Dish Network. Content issue resolved. Apple then utilizes Dish's 4G LTE Spectrum for piggy backed content delivery as well as the obvious satellite subscribers. Then they have a true walled garden.

    Pipe dream with lots of holes to be sure but....

    Alternatively, Apple makes it an Internet TV. Between Hulu, Netflix, etc, it's possible to watch a great deal of content without dealing with the cable companies. It wouldn't be easy to work out the details (Apple might have to buy Hulu), but it would be easier than trying to get the cable companies to cooperate.
  • Reply 64 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    What I cant wait to see is the line of people at the Apple store with their 50" Apple TV sets waiting for the genius bar.
  • Reply 65 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    jragosta wrote: »
    Alternatively, Apple makes it an Internet TV. Between Hulu, Netflix, etc, it's possible to watch a great deal of content without dealing with the cable companies. It wouldn't be easy to work out the details (Apple might have to buy Hulu), but it would be easier than trying to get the cable companies to cooperate.

    I do hope they buy Hulu, its gotten worse and worse as far as selection is concerned.
  • Reply 66 of 86
    rtm135rtm135 Posts: 310member


    My only wish for Apple's new TV is that it includes a built-in Tru2Way or CableCard so I won't need a cable box anymore.

  • Reply 67 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    bmason1270 wrote: »
    Exactly. I just don't see how Apple can eliminate the boxes and provide us with their user experience without controling the content and its distribution. Unless it can work out a cable card deal with the cable companies. But I see no chance of them playing ball and letting Apple control the box.

    The Cable Companies are not going to give up any revenue like VOD or even advertising revenue that gets put on the Cable Box UI.

    Apple could go a Tivo like model but you still have to deal with the cable box.

    No doubt the TV will be slick and I'll want one, but there is zero chance it replaces any current boxes.

    In my Dream World, Apple buys Dish Network. Content issue resolved. Apple then utilizes Dish's 4G LTE Spectrum for piggy backed content delivery as well as the obvious satellite subscribers. Then they have a true walled garden.

    Pipe dream with lots of holes to be sure but....

    I agree with cable card being an option except cable card TVs have been an utter failure, and not every company uses set top boxes with cards, FiOS boxes don't have cards. The problem with getting content is you gotta screw the companies that provide the medium of your content, meaning the cable and phone companies. What's to stop them from saying "oh you want internet only, ok you have a 100 GB cap then"
  • Reply 68 of 86
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    I do hope they buy Hulu, its gotten worse and worse as far as selection is concerned.


    How exactly does Apple go about buying Hulu since it is a joint venture among all of the networks that Apple would supposedly be trying to heavy hand into signing up with iTunes?


     


    Besides it runs entirely in Flash.

  • Reply 69 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    rtm135 wrote: »
    My only wish for Apple's new TV is that it includes a built-in Tru2Way or CableCard so I won't need a cable box anymore.

    That's fine if you only have one TV, I have 4 fairly new TVs. What then?
  • Reply 70 of 86
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    What's to stop them from saying "oh you want internet only, ok you have a 100 GB cap then"


    More likely they screw with your streaming packets and say "Sorry we are experiencing intermittent data transmission issues in your area."  Meanwhile you can get solid download speed in any other protocol.

  • Reply 71 of 86
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,223member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Yes but people had plenty of ready to install content on iPods, CD collections, getting the music industry on board slowly was a luxury they could afford. Yes there had to be carrier agreements but most country like the US have a multitude of networks to deal with. Totally different animal.


    OK, try to think a bit before posting. Take a breath, since your posts are making less and less sense. 


     


    Apple will simply follow its playbook as it has with every major new product introduction.


     


    One, Apple does not typically obtain content or carrier agreements with everyone in an market -- music, movies, books, telephones -- they've entered. They get a critical mass, and the rest will follow. Two, most countries around the world (except the US) have a handful of channels that account for a large share of viewership. They get a critical mass, and the rest will follow. (Moreover, it's not like you won't be able to view the other channels if you have a cable subscription). Three, Apple will simply go to the countries where it is easy to get such 'critical mass' agreements and ignore the rest. They get a critical mass of countries, and the rest will follow. Four, 

  • Reply 72 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    mstone wrote: »
    How exactly does Apple go about buying Hulu since it is a joint venture among all of the networks that Apple would supposedly be trying to heavy hand into signing up with iTunes?

    Besides it runs entirely in Flash.

    Take the network stuff off, 1. Most of it sucks, and 2. Most of it can be viewed on their corresponding website or on demand. Add channels that don't have an on demand presence. I like to watch Runaway Squad and Fugitive Task Force on CI but they have no on demand. If I don't DVR a show I miss it.
  • Reply 73 of 86
    nhtnht Posts: 4,488member
    jragosta wrote: »
    It eliminates at least 2 boxes and 4 cables (in the form most widely being discussed).
    Your proposal:
    TV with power cable
    Cable box with power cable and data cable
    Apple TV with power cable and data cable
    Proposed:
    TV with power cable
    For some people, that difference is HUGE. And if they include DVD and/or BR player, it eliminates another box and 2 more cables.

    No, it simply eliminates 1 box and 2 cables. A box the size of a hockey puck.

    Everything else remains the same in every other scenario. If Apple can get rid of the cable box for the hdtv then it can as well in the aTV scenario. They simply build that capability into the next aTV.

    In any case, unless they have the content deals in place AND a viable last mile solution it is highly unlikely to get rid of the cable box for most folks since cable is their ISP as well. Look at Comcast and how they are treating their VOD data as not part of the data cap.

    The probability that Apple includes built in bluray in their TV approaches zero. An Apple HTiaB makes a lot more sense than an Apple HDTV and that strikes me as still unlikely.

    Add a class t amp to the aTV and 3 hdmi inputs and make a remote app for the iPhone/iPad my wife can use and I'll retire my current Denon reciever.
  • Reply 74 of 86
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,223member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Yes but people had plenty of ready to install content on iPods, CD collections, getting the music industry on board slowly was a luxury they could afford. Yes there had to be carrier agreements but most country like the US have a multitude of networks to deal with. Totally different animal.


    Try to think a bit before posting. Your posts are making less and less sense.


     


    Apple will simply follow the playbook it has with recent product introductions.


     


    One, Apple will strike agreements with a few key content providers -- as it did with music, movies, books, carriers -- and the rest will follow. Two, most countries (except for the US) have a handful of channels that account for a large proportion of viewership. That is no different from the number of music or book publishers, or carriers in a typical country that Apple had to negotiate with. Get those, and the rest will follow. Three, Apple will only introduce the product in those countries where (1) and (2) are relatively easy to do. Get those, and the rest of the (relevant) countries will follow.

  • Reply 75 of 86
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,223member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    What I cant wait to see is the line of people at the Apple store with their 50" Apple TV sets waiting for the genius bar.


    This is what I mean by your posts making less and less sense.

  • Reply 76 of 86
    bmason1270bmason1270 Posts: 258member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    I agree with cable card being an option except cable card TVs have been an utter failure, and not every company uses set top boxes with cards, FiOS boxes don't have cards. The problem with getting content is you gotta screw the companies that provide the medium of your content, meaning the cable and phone companies. What's to stop them from saying "oh you want internet only, ok you have a 100 GB cap then"


    Exactly right and that is why I just don't see the Apple TV that we all want quite ready. Just such a different Media to control from that standpoint.


     


    But, that still leaves room for Apple to really surpise us but it will be in a very different way than we are thinking. The TV will be a king of Apple Convergence, and that I look forward to.

  • Reply 77 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    OK, try to think a bit before posting. Take a breath, since your posts are making less and less sense. 

    Apple will simply follow its playbook as it has with every major new product introduction.

    One, Apple does not typically obtain content or carrier agreements with everyone in an market -- music, movies, books, telephones -- they've entered. They get a critical mass, and the rest will follow. Two, most countries around the world (except the US) have a handful of channels that account for a large share of viewership. They get a critical mass, and the rest will follow. (Moreover, it's not like you won't be able to view the other channels if you have a cable subscription). Three, Apple will simply go to the countries where it is easy to get such 'critical mass' agreements and ignore the rest. They get a critical mass of countries, and the rest will follow. Four, 

    In case they have to have content agreements in place because then how will they be different from every other TV on the market. Can't change form factor nor the UI because the TV will still be a slave to the set top boxes. The TV market is saturated right now. The life cycle of a iPhone or iPad is 2 yrs on a TV is no less than 5 yrs. Apple cannot come anywhere near the critical mass that already exists on TVs.
  • Reply 78 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    This is what I mean by your posts making less and less sense.

    I was being sarcastic not nonsensical, big difference. But do tell me how those big screen TVs will get serviced?
  • Reply 79 of 86
    nhtnht Posts: 4,488member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


     


    One, Apple will strike agreements with a few key content providers -- as it did with music, movies, books, carriers -- and the rest will follow. Two, most countries (except for the US) have a handful of channels that account for a large proportion of viewership. That is no different from the number of music or book publishers, or carriers in a typical country that Apple had to negotiate with. Get those, and the rest will follow. Three, Apple will only introduce the product in those countries where (1) and (2) are relatively easy to do. Get those, and the rest of the (relevant) countries will follow.



     


    These content providers are being paid billions by the cable industry (to include FiOS, Dish, etc in this group) and appear to be none too keen that Apple become the primary digital gateway like they do for music anyway.


     


    It's a tough problem for Apple to crack.  The dollar amounts are quite high and recouping such an investment on the basis of hardware sales tough.


     


    That's about the only thing a Apple HDTV can do that the aTV cannot...have high ASPs.

  • Reply 80 of 86
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    nht wrote: »
    These content providers are being paid billions by the cable industry (to include FiOS, Dish, etc in this group) and appear to be none too keen that Apple become the primary digital gateway like they do for music anyway.

    It's a tough problem for Apple to crack.  The dollar amounts are quite high and recouping such an investment on the basis of hardware sales tough.

    That's about the only thing a Apple HDTV can do that the aTV cannot...have high ASPs.

    And you didn't mention the advertising revenue stream as well. Music was easy to conquer because everyone and the grandmother was stealing music. The TV is far from panic mode and don't not need Apple. And seeing as how Apple hasn't really been a boon for the music industry even with their critical mass I definitely don't see the TV industry using their business model.
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