Brightcove CEO expects Apple TV add-on for FaceTime, motion control

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  • Reply 21 of 49
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,215member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by vandil View Post


    I suppose its possible Apple might make a Wii sensor bar/Kinect.  Sounds like a warranty nightmare though, as something set in such a position will likely fall over.



     


    Sounds like a trade dress nightmare to me. Given how quick Apple has been to slam Samsung with that on the sketchy similarities it seems a given that someone else would render payback on Apple for a similar sketch. 

  • Reply 22 of 49
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,215member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


    I don't see why people keep saying that it makes no sense for Apple to sell TV's in the Apple store.  I understand the "feeling" but I don't see what the rational arguments against it are.  


     



     


    They are saying it is illogical because the stores don't have space for it. Not based on the footprints we can judge. Now I suppose if every store has some secret vast warehouse in the basement we don't know about, the game is different. 


     


    But most of the stores look like they are so small in the back areas that after you take out space for a break area, lockers for employee stuff, a tiny little bathroom, the clean room for the Geniuses to open computers and an office for the managers, there's just not enough space for all the existing stock and a bunch of giant tvs. It's not logistically practical. They would have to give up space for the iDevices etc that they sell hand over fist to make room for something that might see 2 a month. 

  • Reply 23 of 49
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member


    It wouldn't surprise me if Apple is prototyping an actual TV set with an isight camera and siri intigration.  Their were rumors earlier this year of a TV set floating around the design studio.  I'm sure they prototype a lot of things, some of which become products they sell, many others do not.  If they do plan to release a TV set it's because they think they can improve upon what's already out there.

  • Reply 24 of 49
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    gazoobee wrote: »
    I don't see why people keep saying that it makes no sense for Apple to sell TV's in the Apple store.  I understand the "feeling" but I don't see what the rational arguments against it are.  

    To me, this is similar to the "OMG why would anyone use an iPad to take pictures with!" thing.  I understand how it feels kind of goofy, but it's a great camera with a giant viewfinder and there's really no rational reason not to do it.  

    If Apple does make a TV, they would no doubt want it to be competitive size wise.  Why wouldn't they have a 50", 60" and 70" TV?  And what would be wrong or difficult selling them in the Apple store?  What's the difference between that and selling them in Sears or the Bay or anywhere else?  

    See you're thinking very unApple like. Different sizes is not what Apple does. They find one size they think is perfect and stick with it. Those big sizes will not sell well overseas. I'm thinking more along the lines of one 42" or 47" TV at most.
  • Reply 25 of 49
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    See you're thinking very unApple like. Different sizes is not what Apple does. They find one size they think is perfect and stick with it. Those big sizes will not sell well overseas. I'm thinking more along the lines of one 42" or 47" TV at most.


     


    Well .. no. 


     


    First Apple does do sizes, you only have to buy an iMac or a MacBook to know that.  Secondly, TV size is a rapidly evolving business and anything below 50" is now considered "small."  Once they are sold off, you probably won't see 42" TV's for sale much anymore.  No one wants them if they can get bigger at the same price (and they can). 

  • Reply 26 of 49
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    sockrolid wrote: »
    I still think a separate "black bar" would be too much trouble for end-users.  The HDTVs on the market vary too much in size and shape, so it would be tricky to engineer attachment hardware.  And Apple has eliminated all mechanical fiddling from their computing products and accessories, so I doubt they'd want to re-introduce that with any manner of "black bar" accessory.  Also, after you've figured out how to attach it to your TV set, you'd need to aim it at your couch or your normal TV viewing spot.  Even more of the type of end-user hassle that Apple works very hard to avoid.

    In addition, if the iSight camera has significant value (for family FaceTime calls, high-resolution gesture recognition for gaming, biometrics for identifying individual users in the room, etc.) then Apple could help boost sales of their actual HDTV set by making it an exclusive.  The current Apple TV could remain more or less the same, with neither a camera nor a microphone.  The future Apple HDTV set could have a built-in iSight camera and a microphone for Siri commands.  Together they would enable vastly simpler interaction with the TV, justifying its price.  Thus, Apple could have both low-cost and higher-cost TV solutions.

    (As an aside, Apple has been working on biometrics and face recognition since iPhoto '09.  Combine 2d face recognition with 3d focal distance measurements using an iPhone or iPad or iPod touch camera at close range and you could create a reliable biometric authorization system. One that couldn't be fooled by a snapshot like certain Android forks.)

    Most Tv's sit on a table of some sort, so this could be put on the table in front, where the bottom bezel is. For flat screens that are mounted on a wall, it could be clipped either to the top or bottom.

    I don't see a problem at all. This is certainly no more trouble than finding a place for the aTv now. And millions of people are using the Wii sensor, and millions more are using the Kinect. In addition, millions bought seperate web cameras over the years. This isn't so different.
  • Reply 27 of 49
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    charlituna wrote: »
    They are saying it is illogical because the stores don't have space for it. Not based on the footprints we can judge. Now I suppose if every store has some secret vast warehouse in the basement we don't know about, the game is different. 

    But most of the stores look like they are so small in the back areas that after you take out space for a break area, lockers for employee stuff, a tiny little bathroom, the clean room for the Geniuses to open computers and an office for the managers, there's just not enough space for all the existing stock and a bunch of giant tvs. It's not logistically practical. They would have to give up space for the iDevices etc that they sell hand over fist to make room for something that might see 2 a month. 

    You're saying that Apple has no space on the walls of their stores for a big monitor?
  • Reply 28 of 49
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    See you're thinking very unApple like. Different sizes is not what Apple does. They find one size they think is perfect and stick with it. Those big sizes will not sell well overseas. I'm thinking more along the lines of one 42" or 47" TV at most.


    One size? You mean like the two sizes for the iMac. The two sizes for the MacBook Airs, and the three sizes for the iPod line and the MacBook Pro's?

    Those kinds of one size?

    Just as with those devices, and perhaps even more so, there is no perfect size. So far, that only been the case for the iPhone, and that may change. As for Tv's, there are many perfect sizes, depending on the room, and how far you sit from the screen.
  • Reply 29 of 49
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member


    Screen size depends on how far away from the screen you are.  If you live in an apartment, you probably would be overwhelmed with something larger than 55 inch.  Yeah, for big rooms, people will want much larger to get that cinematic experience, but those people would probably opt for a projection system in a dedicated home theater room.


     


    Then it comes down to quality. Some people are blind and deaf when it comes to what high quality audio and video are.  People sometimes regret buying the TVs that are cheap, because they realize afterwards that they wanted 1080p when they actually got 720p and/or the refresh was low or some other factor that produces a less than decent picture quality.  In order to get quality, one must spend at least $2,500 or more.  Some people i have talked to refuse to buy LED, they will only buy plasma, which are typically more expensive.

  • Reply 30 of 49
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


     


    They are saying it is illogical because the stores don't have space for it. Not based on the footprints we can judge. Now I suppose if every store has some secret vast warehouse in the basement we don't know about, the game is different. 


     


    But most of the stores look like they are so small in the back areas that after you take out space for a break area, lockers for employee stuff, a tiny little bathroom, the clean room for the Geniuses to open computers and an office for the managers, there's just not enough space for all the existing stock and a bunch of giant tvs. It's not logistically practical. They would have to give up space for the iDevices etc that they sell hand over fist to make room for something that might see 2 a month. 



     


    Well, those are good reasons if true.  I wasn't aware that there was much information on how much room they had in the back of the store and the only pictures I've seen of same were of one of the larger stores that showed really quite vast spaces back there.  That being said, I would be surprised if anyone opened up a store anywhere in the last fifty years or so that didn't have some kind of standard loading bay access that would allow for such large items to be shipped in.


     


    I would argue also that most large TV's like the ones we are talking about are delivered to the users home instead of being strapped to the top of your car or chucked in the back like the old days.  I know the USA is a "special" place when it comes to this sort of thing with the prevalence of giant trucks and even bigger "big-box" stores but in Canada and in Europe the norm would be to go to the store, pick your model, and have it delivered to your house the next day. 

  • Reply 31 of 49
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    drblank wrote: »
    Screen size depends on how far away from the screen you are.  If you live in an apartment, you probably would be overwhelmed with something larger than 55 inch.  Yeah, for big rooms, people will want much larger to get that cinematic experience, but those people would probably opt for a projection system in a dedicated home theater room.

    Then it comes down to quality. Some people are blind and deaf when it comes to what high quality audio and video are.  People sometimes regret buying the TVs that are cheap, because they realize afterwards that they wanted 1080p when they actually got 720p and/or the refresh was low or some other factor that produces a less than decent picture quality.  In order to get quality, one must spend at least $2,500 or more.  Some people i have talked to refuse to buy LED, they will only buy plasma, which are typically more expensive.

    I mostly agree with you.but there is no such thing as an LED Tv. This is marketing that Egan with Samsung for their LCD models that were backlit with LED's. I wish people would call them L CD sets, because that's what they are.

    As for pricing, if Apple came out with a 55" model for $2,000, that's not really all that expensive. 55" models go for as much as $4,000. This would definitely be a medium priced set at that price.
  • Reply 32 of 49
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    melgross wrote: »
    One size? You mean like the two sizes for the iMac. The two sizes for the MacBook Airs, and the three sizes for the iPod line and the MacBook Pro's?
    Those kinds of one size?
    Just as with those devices, and perhaps even more so, there is no perfect size. So far, that only been the case for the iPhone, and that may change. As for Tv's, there are many perfect sizes, depending on the room, and how far you sit from the screen.

    We did well with TVs smaller than 42" for a very long time and most people still do. I dont see Apple going bigger than 50".
  • Reply 33 of 49
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    We did well with TVs smaller than 42" for a very long time and most people still do. I dont see Apple going bigger than 50".

    Most people I know are buying sets between 45-55". I have a 61" and I'd like a bigger one. We can now buy LCD models up to 85". The average size is continually rising as well, just like computer monitors. One time 12" was considered to be just fine.
  • Reply 34 of 49
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,191member


    Sick and tired of every analyst and their grandmother speculating about a bloody AppleTV or no TV. Stop the madness!

  • Reply 35 of 49
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member


    For those of you concerned.  LG just announced that their new OLED 55 inch TVs are going to be priced around $10,000.   I guess this is going to be the new high end for a 55 inch TV.

  • Reply 36 of 49
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Sick and tired of every analyst and their grandmother speculating about a bloody AppleTV or no TV. Stop the madness!



    They have Apple TV, it's $99 and it works with any TV set. 

  • Reply 37 of 49
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    drblank wrote: »
    For those of you concerned.  LG just announced that their new OLED 55 inch TVs are going to be priced around $10,000.   I guess this is going to be the new high end for a 55 inch TV.

    How long do the displays last? What is the resolution? What is the colour accuracy?
  • Reply 38 of 49
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    I wonder how many people would see having a camera on their TV as a selling point.
  • Reply 39 of 49
    scalperntscalpernt Posts: 23member


    My prediction:  There will not be a TV, instead there will be a TV interface device that is a hybrid of the iPad and AppleTV, that will be specialized to connect to a variety of TV's via airplay.  It will feature Siri, and Apple will launch the device with several partners who will manufacture TV's that will connect to the device out of the box wirelessly.  You'll use it to control the TV, and play content on the TV, but it won't actually be used to play content on the device itself.  Then we'll all just use our iPad/AppleTV hybrid devices (iPlay?) to control our entire entertainment experience using our voices from the convenience of a couch from across the room.  It will replace all remote controls and the pitch will be that your TV no longer needs any of the other boxes connected to it.  The iPlay will play games, channel surf, play all sorts of content from iTunes/Netflix/etc., play slide shows from iPhoto, and can even pull up your calendar and email if you want it to.


     


    Makes sense on a number of levels:


     


    1. Market for people who already have flatscreens>People who are itching to replace their flatscreens


    2. Lower price point = bigger market potential


    3. Small device can easily integrate into Apple Stores


    4. Solves the "Remote Control" problem - there is definitely a market for people who want a better way of controlling all their entertainment devices.  This thing would be the solution, and that would be it's primary selling proposition.


     


    I imagine it will also require Apple to move the football forward on it's negotiations with Studios re: Video content.  But if that happens, I think this is where all the arrows seem to be pointing.


     


    Mark my words: Apple is not getting into the TV business.

  • Reply 40 of 49
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    How long do the displays last? What is the resolution? What is the colour accuracy?


    Displays usually last over 10 o 12 years, obviously depending on what technology is being used, but these days, they are always coming out with more enhanced displays, slimmer, more features, etc.  So, the average person will upgrade their TV about every 7 years.


     


    Before 720p was common, now people are moving to 1080p.  Color accuracy?  There are many things people will look at other than color accuracy.


     


    If you want a little more knowledge, might i suggest reading the better audio/video magazines that actually do a better job in reviewing products. Some of these magazines like Consumer Reports or other mags actually don't do a very good job in reviewing products.  Consumer Reports doesn't usually review the upper end of the range.  So, it depends on how much importance you have in video/audio.  Some TVs may do 2D well, but 3D not so well.  Some look OK in the store, but when you take them home, they might not perform like you expect.  Lighting conditions will alter how well the TV will perform and most of us don't have optimal lighting conditions, or room acoustics unless you have a dedicated home theater room that professionals have gone through to ensure optimal lighting and acoustics for optimal performance.  Some people quite frankly, don't really care.


     


    Apple, life everyone, has to figure out what market they want to go after and what is considered to be high quality and what price range will yield enough sales to make it worthwhile going after that market.


     


    I just hope if they do go after the TV market that they do their homework and really get some experts to assist them and they compare against the REAL high end but make them affordable.   Good luck!!  :-)


     


    Magazines I found useful to read  Stereophile/Home Theater , The Absolute Sound/The Perfect Vision, and Secrets of Home Theater/Higher Fidelity are good sources for reviews.   They are usually reviewed by serious minded people and do fairly in depth reviews, but again, use them as a guide and resource for knowledge.   If you read a magazine review and the review is less than 4 pages long, that is usually a Press Release review and they are basically regurgitating the company's website and are superficial reviews.  Some of these magazines have their reviews on line.

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