FBI issues warning to smartphone users regarding Android malware

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Comments

  • Reply 81 of 104
    Loving the walled garden right now. Garden of Eden.
  • Reply 82 of 104
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Apple removed a perfectly functional app...

    ...obviously telling half-truths...

    No turn by turn is "perfectly functional", is it?

    Seeing as how you brought up the subject of "half-truths".

    Google maps was crippled on iOS, deliberately in order to increase sales of Android devices.

    Good riddance to bad rubbish.
  • Reply 83 of 104
    kr00kr00 Posts: 99member


    Yay, Android is OPEN!!!!! Like an axe wound to the back of the skull. Hope you fandroids have had your shots.

  • Reply 84 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kr00 View Post


    Yay, Android is OPEN!!!!! Like an axe wound to the back of the skull. Hope you fandroids have had your shots.



     


    I've never been hit to the back of the skull with an axe, but I highly doubt it being such a pleasure as complete freedom over my OS.

  • Reply 85 of 104
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,252member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by shompa View Post



    The big question: what is google hiding?

    In my country we have a legal right to know everything a company stores on their computers about a customer. I did a legal request a month ago. Google is the only company that refuses give me the data.

    I hope I win in court.


    Start with your Google Dashboard. You can view the information associated with your Google services or accounts, and correct, modify or restrict the types of information you share with them. Certainly not a thorough reporting of everything associated with your "profile", but Google does at least offer a simple way to control how and what is shared with them. It's the first place I'd go if I was concerned about 'what Google knows".


     


    You mentioned only Google refuses to tell you what information is stored, or at least it's taking them more than a month to comply. I've always been curious about what Apple keeps on file about us. What did they report to you and how long did it take for them to respond? 

  • Reply 86 of 104
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Start with your Google Dashboard. You can view the information associated with your Google services or accounts, and correct, modify or restrict the types of information you share with them. Certainly not a thorough reporting of everything associated with your "profile", but Google does at least offer a simple way to control how and what is shared with them. It's the first place I'd go if I was concerned about 'what Google knows".

    You mentioned only Google refuses to tell you what information is stored, or at least it's taking them more than a month to comply. I've always been curious about what Apple keeps on file about us. What did they report to you and how long did it take for them to respond? 

    I see that you're failing to admit that Google keeps information about you that they don't disclose. For example, there was the case with Safari that they completely ignored your privacy settings.
  • Reply 87 of 104
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,252member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Start with your Google Dashboard. You can view the information associated with your Google services or accounts, and correct, modify or restrict the types of information you share with them. Certainly not a thorough reporting of everything associated with your "profile", but Google does at least offer a simple way to control how and what is shared with them. It's the first place I'd go if I was concerned about 'what Google knows".



     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post





    I see that you're failing to admit that Google keeps information about you that they don't disclose. .


    I see you haven't had a cup of coffee yet, nor wearing your glasses this morning.

  • Reply 88 of 104
    bigmac2bigmac2 Posts: 637member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post





    It isn't a Java program. It's a Dalvik program. Android doesn't use the Java Virtual Machine.


     


     Android is a Java platform, the Dalvik runtime environment on Android is based on Java, they convert Java bytecode class into Dalvik Executable. 

  • Reply 89 of 104
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,252member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post


     


     Android is a Java platform, the Dalvik runtime environment on Android is based on Java, they convert Java bytecode class into Dalvik Executable. 



    According to one of Oracle's lead engineers and Java expert it's not:


     


    "For the other commenter who thinks Android is "based on Java", you are incorrect. While it is true that the programming language for Android is the Java programming language, the Android platform itself uses the Dalvik virtual machine and processes Dalvik bytecode, not Java bytecode, so the Android platform is NOT based specifically on Java ME technology.


    That is why the chart (above) from the Net Applications mobile analytics company, specifically calls out and differentiates "Java ME" from "Android" as two distinct Mobile/Tablet OSes, see the chart. Otherwise, if you think about it, why would they list the two different OSes in their Mobile/Tablet OS Share chart?


    Posted by Hinkmond Wong on January 02, 2012 at 05:25 AM PST #"

  • Reply 90 of 104
    bigmac2bigmac2 Posts: 637member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    According to one of Oracle's lead engineers and Java expert it's not:


     


    "For the other commenter who thinks Android is "based on Java", you are incorrect. While it is true that the programming language for Android is the Java programming language, the Android platform itself uses the Dalvik virtual machine and processes Dalvik bytecode, not Java bytecode, so the Android platform is NOT based specifically on Java ME technology.


    That is why the chart (above) from the Net Applications mobile analytics company, specifically calls out and differentiates "Java ME" from "Android" as two distinct Mobile/Tablet OSes, see the chart. Otherwise, if you think about it, why would they list the two different OSes in their Mobile/Tablet OS Share chart?


    Posted by Hinkmond Wong on January 02, 2012 at 05:25 AM PST #"



     


    Ok so what you are saying is: Android IDE is Java classes but the runtime is not based on JaveME making programs compiled for Dalvik VM incompatible with JavaME.  To my understanding replacing the JavaME runtime by another bytecode JIT doesn't negated the fact of being a java based platform using Java API's.  

  • Reply 91 of 104


    Originally Posted by kermitos View Post

    I've never been hit to the back of the skull with an axe, but I highly doubt it being such a pleasure as complete freedom over my OS.


     


    I doubt you can compare the two at all, since you've not experienced either.

  • Reply 92 of 104
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,252member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post


     


    Ok so what you are saying is: Android IDE is Java classes but the runtime is not based on JaveME making programs compiled for Dalvik VM incompatible with JavaME.  To my understanding replacing the JavaME runtime by another bytecode JIT doesn't negated the fact of being a java based platform.  



    No, I'm not saying that at all. The quote is from a lead Oracle engineer and purported expert in Java. Perhaps you are too, I don't know.

  • Reply 93 of 104
    mikeb85mikeb85 Posts: 506member


    Android is inherently very secure, but security falls on the user.  As of right now, pretty much the only way to get malware onto an Android phone is to physically download and install it yourself.  This doesn't make Android insecure, it makes people stupid. 


     


    BTW, the iPhone is also vulnerable in the same ways, but most users don't jailbreak their iPhones and only install Apple-certified apps, which guarantees to filter out 99.9% of potential trouble.


     


    More alarming is how easy phones are to hack, including the iPhone... 

     

  • Reply 94 of 104
    bigmac2bigmac2 Posts: 637member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    No, I'm not saying that at all. The quote is from a lead Oracle engineer and purported expert in Java. Perhaps you are too, I don't know.



     


    I wasn't intend to be rude, but the quote from Oracle engineer was in context of Google case if they have steal works or not from Oracle, and in this case it was determine the Dalvik VM was not based on JavaME works.  My points is Android development environment still 100% java, you can't run native linux apps on Android because there is no GUI API outside the Dalvik VM.

  • Reply 95 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hill60 View Post





    No turn by turn is "perfectly functional", is it?

    Seeing as how you brought up the subject of "half-truths".

    Google maps was crippled on iOS, deliberately in order to increase sales of Android devices.

    Good riddance to bad rubbish.


    There's a difference between "perfectly functional" and "fully featured".  Google Maps on iOS was perfectly functional, not fully featured.  Maps still isn't fully featured, and now it's less functional.


     


    Google withholding full turn by turn navigation has nothing to do with half-truths.  It's the whole truth, and it makes sense as a competitive advantage.  It obviously wasn't a big enough problem for Apple to ditch the service for the first five years of the iPhone, so why not wait a sixth year and release a truly world-class maps application?


     


    To tie this back in, the press on Maps was fully deserved and was not biased.

  • Reply 96 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post


     


    I wasn't intend to be rude, but the quote from Oracle engineer was in context of Google case if they have steal works or not from Oracle, and in this case it was determine the Dalvik VM was not based on JavaME works.  My points is Android development environment still 100% java, you can't run native linux apps on Android because there is no GUI API outside the Dalvik VM.



     


    Android isn't Java based because you can't run .class files on an Android device, at least not without first installing a Java Virtual Machine. Further, you don't have to use the Dalvik VM at all -- you can use the NDK to build native ARM, x86, or MIPS executables.

  • Reply 97 of 104
    According to this article its not just android, but affects every smartphone os. So have fun when your apple phone gets hacked too.

    http://thenextweb.com/google/2012/10/15/fbi-issues-mobile-malware-warning-specifically-discusses-android-and-offers-safety-tips/
  • Reply 98 of 104
    When in a meeting, why do iPhone users set their phone on the table in front of them and then fondle it every few minutes for no apparent reason? Doesn't happen with Windows, Blackberry, or Android phones, only the iPhone. It's bizarre.

    iOS is really kind of lame. Want to use Pandora? Oh, gotta wait for Apple to fix iOS. Got a longer screen? Oh, gotta wait for the developers to fix their apps. Apple can't even design an original clock face, they had to steal it, like everything else they do.

  • Reply 99 of 104


    I have a Mac OSX, iPad, Android Galaxy Nexus, and a Windows 7 PC. I have never had any problem with any of them because of one simple rule... "Don't be an idiot!" 


     


    It's not like these things 'just happen', a user has to physically invite these attacks on their devices. It's kind of like those spam emails where they ask for your bank account so they can wire you millions of dollars. No offense, but people who fall for that kind of stuff deserve to get scammed. Any intelligent person can easily avoid these attacks by using common sense, likewise, any idiot can still be attacked by stuff like this whether or not they use an Apple product or Google product. 


     


    And shompa.... Where are you getting your information? Because most of it is just wrong.

  • Reply 100 of 104

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post


    the entire Frasier series is up about 3 or 4 times over.  I've also watched countless operas and movies, many of which are still up.  And I haven't even been looking, really.



     


    So... Google is terrible because they allow illegal content but it's ok for you to watch that content. Typical Apple hypocrite. Maybe Google would pull it if you'd report it instead of watching it.

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