Apple supplies third beta of iOS 6.1 to developers

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  • Reply 21 of 33
    File a bug report guys.
    I'm a iOS developer and the engineers at apple really look at the reports.
    http://techtips.salon.com/report-bug-iphone-3668.html
  • Reply 22 of 33



    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shogun View Post


    This is a UI usability nightmare, I suggest.  


     


    It's like teaching people the power button will turn power on or off, unless the clock is within five minutes to the hour, in which case your power button will activate an ear piercing siren noise...  



     


    The home screen UI follows a pretty simple principle:   When you open an app from the home screen, pressing Home takes you back to the page and folder that you were looking at.  (Search is an exception.)


     


    Why is this a good design?



    • When you accidentally press the Home button, it's very easy to correct your mistake.  Just tap the app again.  No need to find the folder again.


    • When you open a folder and tap the wrong app, it's very easy to correct your mistake.  Just press Home and then tap on the correct app.  No need to find the folder again.


    • When you're working with related apps, this reduces the amount of work required to switch between them.  For example, I have a "News" folder with a bunch of the news apps (Hourly News, Reeder, etc.) that I check on a regular basis.  I can easily open the News folder, open Hourly News, play the news, press Home, then open Reeder.  This would be more tedious if home screen folders closed automatically.


    • It prevents the Home button from being disorienting.  You can immediately recognize where you are.  Same page, same folder open.  (It sounds like you're asking for "same page, no folder open" which doesn't sound clearly better or less confusing.)

  • Reply 23 of 33
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    m0dest wrote: »
    The home screen UI follows a pretty simple principle:   When you open an app from the home screen, pressing Home takes you back to the page and folder that you were looking at.  (Search is an exception.)

    Why is this a good design?
    • When you accidentally press the Home button, it's very easy to correct your mistake.  Just tap the app again.  No need to find the folder again.
    • <span style="line-height:1.231;">When you open a folder and tap the wrong app, it's very easy to correct your mistake.  Just press Home and then tap on the correct app.  No need to find the folder again.</span>
    • <span style="line-height:1.231;">When you're working with related apps, this reduces the amount of work required to switch between them.  For example, I have a "News" folder with a bunch of the news apps (Hourly News, Reeder, etc.) that I check on a regular basis.  I can easily open the News folder, open Hourly News, play the news, press Home, then open Reeder.  This would be more tedious if home screen folders closed automatically.</span>
    • <span style="line-height:1.231;">It prevents the Home button from being disorienting.  You can immediately recognize where you are.  Same page, same folder open.  (It sounds like you're asking for "same page, no folder open" which doesn't sound clearly better or less confusing.)</span>

    Great first post!
  • Reply 24 of 33

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Well, yeah. That's how it works for folders, too. Newsstand is a folder. Think of it as such and it makes sense. It operates like a folder in that it drops down within the Springboard, it can't be put into a folder (can't nest folders), and no content outside it is accessible without closing it.


     


    Whether Newsstand SHOULD be a folder is another argument, though. I'm of the belief that Newsstand (and iTunes U) should be merged with iBooks as simply a category therein. iTunes U would have its same background of darker, richer wood, and Newsstand would be given a background of metal shelving, similar to, you know, an actual newsstand. I like this idea, but hey.



     


    You people and your "skeumorphism".  Fake wood, geez.  It should all be on a background of sterile white.  That is design!

  • Reply 25 of 33
    vaelianvaelian Posts: 446member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I don't get why you would type an 'n' instead of using the space bar and then complain that the system doesn't pick up on your code to have certain 'n's replaced with spaces.

    Because it's a virtual keyboard that is supposed to obsolete physical keyboards. Since the virtual keyboard does not provide the ability to touch type, it might as well run some heuristics in order to identify potential typos, such as people occasionally touching N or M rather than space. This problem annoys me as well, because I find it unproductive to look at the keyboard as I type, especially if I have one or more fingers covering it. Ideally one shouldn't even have to look at the keyboard; the software should be able to recognize what we want to type based on the relative position of our taps, by comparing what could possibly be there in a QWERTY keyboard to what makes sense in the context of the word that we're typing.

    oomu wrote: »
    and I hope never and to forget that all complexity !

    What complexity? All UNIX clones, Darwin (and thus, iOS) included, have a privilege system built into the kernel!

    EDIT: IOS even borrows code from TrustedBSD to implement its sandbox!
  • Reply 26 of 33
    iOS needs webOS style multitasking.
  • Reply 27 of 33


    Originally Posted by iSteelers View Post

    You people and your "skeumorphism".  Fake wood, geez.  It should all be on a background of sterile white.  That is design!


     


    White text. White drop shadow behind the text to make it stand out.





    Originally Posted by appleempl View Post

    iOS needs webOS style multitasking.


     


    No.


     


    Er, I mean, why?

  • Reply 28 of 33
    jingojingo Posts: 93member
    Any sign of the myriad of bluetooth problems using iPhones in cars being fixed?
  • Reply 29 of 33


    Why so dismissive? I think this would be a great idea on a family iPad. Each family member has their own user, their own apps and their own customisations. If one account gets corrupted or, God forbid, infected by malware, you login to the admin user and delete the account. Each account would also be able to sync with it's own iTunes library/Apple ID.

  • Reply 30 of 33


    Originally Posted by daniel84 View Post

    Why so dismissive? I think this would be a great idea on a family iPad. Each family member has their own user, their own apps and their own customisations.


     


    The idea is to have your own device. You'll notice Android doesn't even do this. Wonder why.


     



     If one account gets corrupted or, God forbid, infected by malware…


     


    Except that won't be happening… at all. And if it did, the entire device would be compromised.

  • Reply 31 of 33
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,308member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by daniel84 View Post


    Why so dismissive? I think this would be a great idea on a family iPad. Each family member has their own user, their own apps and their own customisations. If one account gets corrupted or, God forbid, infected by malware, you login to the admin user and delete the account. Each account would also be able to sync with it's own iTunes library/Apple ID.



     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    The idea is to have your own device. You'll notice Android doesn't even do this. Wonder why.



    Tallest, Android does offer multi-user support so no need to wonder about it. I meant to set this up on a Nexus7 last evening but got side-tracked.


    http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/21327/android-42-multiuser-support

  • Reply 32 of 33
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,308member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by oomu View Post



    "Any sign of multi-user log-in coming to iOS?"

    in a .x version ? of course not.

    and I hope never and to forget that all complexity !

    -

    When some people speak about how much to go back to folder (or newstand) is usability nightmare, I _DO_ hope we will see NEVER the coming back of "multi user" complexity.


    It doesn't have to be complex. See the link in the preceding post. Personally I think it would be a great convenience to a lot of iPad users who could put a wall between their children's apps and such and those meant for the adult in the house. So Apple might not sell a few multiple iPads to a single household. Overall I think it would actually increase sales, being more attractive to families on a budget with multiple potential users. 


     


    That's beside the fact it would fit right in with Cooks and Ive's declaration that it's not about the money anyway but instead the best possible user experience, right?

  • Reply 33 of 33


    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

    Tallest, Android does offer multi-user support so no need to wonder about it.


     


    Huh. And that's fairly recent, too. Thanks!

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