Home Depot abandoning BlackBerry platform in favor of Apple's iPhone and iOS

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Comments

  • Reply 39 of 66
    Get hammered like what? Your so uninformed. If anything I would be wondering why Apple has lost $250 a share in 5 months. Hmm looks like the investers smell a future loser. Losses of hundreds of billion of dollars and market share to google. BB has tripled their value in a couple months. Hmmm ; )
  • Reply 39 of 66
    Get hammered like what? Your so uninformed. If anything I would be wondering why Apple has lost $250 a share in 5 months. Hmm looks like the investers smell a future loser. Losses of hundreds of billion of dollars and market share to google. BB has tripled their value in a couple months. Hmmm ; )
  • Reply 43 of 66
    Get hammered like what? Your so uninformed. If anything I would be wondering why Apple has lost $250 a share in 5 months. Hmm looks like the investers smell a future loser. Losses of hundreds of billion of dollars and market share to google. BB has tripled their value in a couple months. Hmmm ; )
  • Reply 43 of 66
    Get hammered like what? Your so uninformed. If anything I would be wondering why Apple has lost $250 a share in 5 months. Hmm looks like the investers smell a future loser. Losses of hundreds of billion of dollars and market share to google. BB has tripled their value in a couple months. Hmmm ; )
  • Reply 45 of 66
    The reason they picked the iphone 4 is price. When you can pay 250 bucks instead of 500 it makes sense. They pay half of what we pay because they buy in bulk....First off its a really old phone. Second any moron can use a iphone. ( i guess android is too hard for their super smart staff making minimum wage). Third they wanted to free advertising by publicly stating they are changing handsets. Why would BB care about Home Depot box stores. 90% of the fortune 500 still use the older blackberry because they still consider the iphone as a toy. The president of the United States still uses a bb.
  • Reply 46 of 66
    This is good news for Apple, but not very significant compared to the number of Motorola devices they use on the sale floor running Windows CE.
  • Reply 47 of 66

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I was in Lowe's a few months ago and they were already using the iPhone for inventory. All the floor sales staff were carrying specially equipped iPhones with laser bar code readers. Home Depot is playing catch up.



    The problem with Lowe's is the software they are using sucks; the lady at the returns counter only had negative things to say about the iPhones when I asked her about them.  She said they constantly have to reboot them and they are buggy.


     


    Home Depot is NOT trying to play catch up.  Home Depot, at least at the moment, will not be replacing all of the Motorola, formerly Symbol, devices that floor staff use on a daily basis.  These devices run Windows CE by the way, Target staff uses similar models for their operations.  


     


    Home Depot management will not be using these iPhones to help do inventory or sales floor activities; it's a corporate phone and it will be used for E-Mail and calling.  Management will use their motorola devices for all other activities, assuming that management even does things like inventory, etc.

  • Reply 48 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,894member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I was in Lowe's a few months ago and they were already using the iPhone for inventory. All the floor sales staff were carrying specially equipped iPhones with laser bar code readers. Home Depot is playing catch up.



    Thanks!


    I thought that Lowes was originally using some modified iPods and began switching over to a specialized iPhone4 in 2011. Perhaps not according to this article. I thought it odd that they disabled the iPhone calling features as well as email and text capabilities tho. Why not use the iPod Touch if they weren't going to make use of the phone features? In any event it's clear Lowes found value in Apple's products and put them to good use.


     


    http://www.phonearena.com/news/Lowes-to-give-42000-Apple-iPhone-4-handsets-to-employees_id21999

  • Reply 49 of 66
    kdarlingkdarling Posts: 1,640member


    Lowes uses what (I think) Apple Stores use these days:  a LineaPro 4 enclosure for the iPhone, that adds an extra battery, barcode scanner, and card swiper.


     


     



     


    In the old days (i.e. the previous  couple of decades) a company like Lowes would've bought ruggedized all-in-one devices from suppliers like Symbol (which was acquired by Motorola) or Panasonic... and programmed it under Windows CE / .Net.  Heck, even Apple stores used Windows CE handhelds until fairly recently.


     


    Now, with less Microsoft support, and growing management trust in off the shelf devices, the tide has turned in simpler situations towards using stock phones / tablets with custom enclosures.

  • Reply 50 of 66
    One thing we never seem to hear is some company switching from BB to Android. All the large companies I've seen in the news went to iOS.
  • Reply 51 of 66
    kdarlingkdarling Posts: 1,640member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post



    One thing we never seem to hear is some company switching from BB to Android. All the large companies I've seen in the news went to iOS.


     


    In the enterprise application business, we see both iOS and Android usage.   A lot depends on what security and administration tools are available.  iOS is getting better in that regard.  


     


    From the stats I've seen, currently enterprise-owned devices tend toward iOS, whereas BYOD tends toward Android.


     


    That's not set in stone, of course.  For example, last year Verizon Wireless bought and deployed 4,000 Android tablets for its corporate salespeople. 


     


    In my experience, if an enterprise had an investment in creating their own Blackberry Java apps, then they tend towards switching to Android, because they can more easily leverage their Java developers who are already familiar with the legacy apps.

  • Reply 52 of 66


    Originally Posted by blazr View Post

    Get hammered like what? Your so uninformed. If anything I would be wondering why Apple has lost $250 a share in 5 months. Hmm looks like the investers smell a future loser. Losses of hundreds of billion of dollars and market share to google. BB has tripled their value in a couple months. Hmmm ; )


     


    I really wish all these RIM employees would stop creating sock puppet accounts here.


     



     


    Your value has tripled from "crap" to "old carpet stain".  "Uninformed", huh?

  • Reply 53 of 66
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,709member
    blazr wrote: »
    Get hammered like what? Your so uninformed. If anything I would be wondering why Apple has lost $250 a share in 5 months. Hmm looks like the investers smell a future loser. Losses of hundreds of billion of dollars and market share to google. BB has tripled their value in a couple months. Hmmm ; )

    Skittish investors are relying in anti-Apple media reports. Losses of hundreds of billions? Last time I check Apple still had 70% of the cell phone profits.
  • Reply 54 of 66
    This is the merely the tip of the iceberg for BlackBerry. This isn't going to be just a snowball effect but more of an avalanche as companies ditch the BB OS. Corporations don't want to invest money into a company that may be gone a year from now. It looks like another Palm in the making. BlackBerry needed to do a lot more than just change its name. At his rate, they might just as well have named the company DingleBerry.

    I honestly don't want to see the company fail because of the workers losing their jobs. The problem is BlackBerry (RIM) was the only thing Canada had going for it. Without BlackBerry it would be just a frozen wasteland being inhabited by moose and elk. Anyway, RIM was a good company while it lasted but nothing lasts forever.
  • Reply 55 of 66
    Oh you Americans are so funny...
    I read this news today and traced back its origin to this forum.
    As a non-American, I have to admit that I've never ever heard about a shop called "Home Depot" before. But how can anybody really believe that switching rougly 10000 devices from one non-US company to a US-company would have ANY stronger impact on the estimated 5-8 mil Blackberry sales in q1/2013?
    10000 devices is peantus, and as I don't know "Home Depot" I suspect that the vast majority of US-americans doesn't know companys like Metro, which uses at least the same amount of BB handsets but is European?
    Hello, wake up, there is a world out there and Blackberry is very widely used. I suspect the BB usage rather to grow than to decline due to security issues with other services - US-based cloud services like Office365 or Google docs do not fulfill European privacy rights, therefore it is illegal for European companies to use these services. And, are there really people in the US thinking that any Russian or Chinese companies would ever use US-based services??
    Blackberry is at present the only alternative if companies are looking for secure services that are not under surveillance of US authorities, therefore Blackberry HAS a market.
    It's quite ok and not unusual at all that some American hardware store decides to support the local business in favor to the Canadian, but that has no impact on the worldwide sales at all. Nor on the stock, that's ridiculous:)
  • Reply 56 of 66


    Originally Posted by kingofbeer View Post

    Hello, wake up, there is a world out there and Blackberry is very widely used. 




    So where are they in usage stats?






    And, are there really people in the US thinking that any Russian or Chinese companies would ever use US-based services??





    Given they occasionally do, I would imagine so.





    Blackberry is at present the only alternative if companies are looking for secure services that are not under surveillance of US authorities…


     


    Well, US companies, at least. Thousands of US companies wouldn't trust Google, even.






    …that has no impact on the worldwide sales at all. Nor on the stock, that's ridiculous:)



     


    It has an impact in that the US is in the world, therefore sales there affect total worldwide sales. It has an equivalent effect on the stock. Ridiculous is claiming otherwise.

  • Reply 57 of 66

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     

    It has an impact in that the US is in the world, therefore sales there affect total worldwide sales. It has an equivalent effect on the stock. Ridiculous is claiming otherwise.


     


    Yes, of course, you're absolutely right. On the other hand,10000 devices, swapped over a long term, thats not a particular high number compared to the 4-8 million RIM usually sells per quarter.


    I sometimes get really anoyed when news are translated from US-sites and make their way through the whole internet but in my language, leaving the impression they are not reflecting the American point of view.


    I'm particularly pissed of Microsoft and the US point-of-view that led investors to the fatal decision to let Nokia drop its own OS in favor of the lousy Windows Phone, which again led to the destruction of Nokia.


    I mean, Nokia was not common in the US, that's why the press was really negativ about Symbian and MeeGo. However, it WAS common in the rest of the world. Microsoft promised a high US market share if Nokia would switch to Windows. Now, we eventually have a poor Nokia market share throughout the world and Nokia sold all their european properties and factories plus released all their software developers (or at least most of them). Sorry, they should just have been happy with what they had, especially the almost 80% market share in China (a market which is even bigger than the US market) was a quite comfortable situation.


    I'm in person using the last real Nokia - a Nokia N9, and I'm desperately waiting for the new Sailfish, Ubuntu and Tizen phones to be released. Not that I wouldn't like the US - actually I love beeing in the US. However, I do not agree with some strange US laws like the patriot act, and when it comes to business usage I really don't understand how a company could even consider storing sensible data on US servers. And that's why I think there is a space for Blackberry in the enterprise market, and there will also be a huge demand for phones that are not connect to either the iCloud, Google Cloud or Windows Cloud services.

  • Reply 58 of 66


    Originally Posted by kingofbeer View Post

    Yes, of course, you're absolutely right. On the other hand,10000 devices, swapped over a long term, thats not a particular high number compared to the 4-8 million RIM usually sells per quarter.


     


    The US generally has the highest proportion of everything. That includes developers. No one develops for the platform, it won't get adopted anywhere.

  • Reply 59 of 66
    Well, we'll see. Given the fact there are already 70000+ apps available plus BBOS10 plays as well (repacked) Android apps AND Qt apps (as well supported by SailfishOS, Ubuntu mobile and Tizen) I hardly doubt you're right...
  • Reply 60 of 66


    Originally Posted by kingofbeer View Post

    Well, we'll see. Given the fact there are already 70000+ apps available plus BBOS10 plays as well (repacked) Android apps AND Qt apps (as well supported by SailfishOS, Ubuntu mobile and Tizen) I hardly doubt you're right...


     


    70,000… vs. 700,000. And a growing install base of 500,000,000 devices.


     


    BlackBerry, at best, will have a niche. It won't be what it once was.

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