Google steps further into the hardware fray, announces touchscreen Chromebook Pixel

167891012»

Comments

  • Reply 221 of 228


    As with many others here, I'm not understanding this product or perhaps who the target market is. Wasn't one of the complaints about the first rMBPs that the Intel HD4000 was not quite up to the task of driving such a hi-res display? Then Google releases this with an even slower version of the processor but (slightly) higher res??? And for all the complaints about Apple not including USB3 soon enough in their computers, for this to only have USB2 is crazy. I don't think anything more needs to be said about the small SSD size. It seems the Google tax on this thing is much higher than any supposed Apple tax.


     


    Looking at the pics from Engadget, is it just me, or does it seem there's a sizable area at the bottom of the display on the Chromebook Pixel that's just dead area? The display area on the rMBP appears as large or larger than that of the Pixel to me, but it's possible it's an illusion.


     


    The completely rectangular shape, to me, is not appealing and whether the edges are beveled or not, I bet it's not nice to carry in your hand for any real length of time.


     


    I'll be interested to see how serviceable it is when iFixIt tears it apart. Their stated goal of "as few screws as possible" could well be met by gluing everything together, who knows.

  • Reply 222 of 228
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    As with many others here, I'm not understanding this product or perhaps who the target market is. Wasn't one of the complaints about the first rMBPs that the Intel HD4000 was not quite up to the task of driving such a hi-res display? Then Google releases this with an even slower version of the processor but (slightly) higher res??? And for all the complaints about Apple not including USB3 soon enough in their computers, for this to only have USB2 is crazy. I don't think anything more needs to be said about the small SSD size. It seems the Google tax on this thing is much higher than any supposed Apple tax.

    Looking at the pics from Engadget, is it just me, or does it seem there's a sizable area at the bottom of the display on the Chromebook Pixel that's just dead area? The display area on the rMBP appears as large or larger than that of the Pixel to me, but it's possible it's an illusion.

    The completely rectangular shape, to me, is not appealing and whether the edges are beveled or not, I bet it's not nice to carry in your hand for any real length of time.

    I'll be interested to see how serviceable it is when iFixIt tears it apart. Their stated goal of "as few screws as possible" could well be met by gluing everything together, who knows.

    Good points. I had wondered about the GPU but wasn't sure that it didn't come with a discrete version. Also, what's up with USB? Isn't 3.0 part of that Ivy Bridge chipset? I do like the look of it and I'm glad it's metal and not plastic. Can't wait to see iFixit and AnandTech's review. Perhaps the nature of Chrome OS will make the HD4000 iGPU highly doable, hence their decision to go Retina.
  • Reply 223 of 228
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member


    Is this supposed to be thinner than the rMBP?  Because it looks thicker to me.  But I'm still trying to figure out what makes this the best designed laptop ever (according to the Verge).  They gave the 13" rMBP a 7/10 for performance but this thing gets a 9?  WTF? And has anyone commented on whether the screen looks better than the 13" rMBP?  Obviously just looking at raw spec it's better, but at what point can the human eye not tell the difference? And shouldn't battery life factor into the equation?  From the reviews I've seen the rMBP has better battery life.  To me that's more important than a having the most pixels on the screen.

  • Reply 224 of 228

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Good points. I had wondered about the GPU but wasn't sure that it didn't come with a discrete version. Also, what's up with USB? Isn't 3.0 part of that Ivy Bridge chipset? I do like the look of it and I'm glad it's metal and not plastic. Can't wait to see iFixit and AnandTech's review. Perhaps the nature of Chrome OS will make the HD4000 iGPU highly doable, hence their decision to go Retina.


    Sure thought Ivy Bridge brought USB3 (and is what Apple was waiting for to include it so they didn't have to use a separate chip) ... which makes using USB2 on this very odd.


     


    They may get away with using the integrated graphics since this doesn't run powerful software that would really require something better? Ie, if all you use it for is email and web browsing, it may be fine. But then one would have to wonder why you would pay so much for it just to do those activities :/

  • Reply 225 of 228
    rogifan wrote: »
    Interesting that a weekend after the Verge had Google Glass plastered all over their website they put out an overly positive review of this laptop.  Hmmm...

    And the reviewer claims: "nearly every single person walking by my aisle looked at the Pixel as they passed. One guy even did a double-take, screeching to a halt in the aisle as if he’d seen a ghost in seat 17G.”

    We're really supposed to believe this?   Sorry but I call BS on that one.

    Engadget has pictures up comparing the Chromebook Pixel to the 13" rMBP.  Does Google have no shame?!  http://www.engadget.com/gallery/chromebook-pixel-vs-13-inch-macbook-pro-with-retina
    If google is not copying Apple than who else to, I guess.
    (In this alone similar OS, Resolution, Setup, Interface, yet they have less ports[what is that port on the C.B.P. that looks like thunderbolt] and it has well less inside (less speed ,mem. ,battery) the only advantage is touchscreen, as a short term advantage only.
  • Reply 226 of 228


    So not only would you suggest this machine which means I would have to pay for it, but if I do not like the OS, I should pony up more for another OS? If I were to us Ms would this not make this purchase even more expensive?

  • Reply 227 of 228
    Sure thought Ivy Bridge brought USB3 (and is what Apple was waiting for to include it so they didn't have to use a separate chip) ... which makes using USB2 on this very odd.

    They may get away with using the integrated graphics since this doesn't run powerful software that would really require something better? Ie, if all you use it for is email and web browsing, it may be fine. But then one would have to wonder why you would pay so much for it just to do those activities :/

    It's all very odd with the icing on the cake being The Verge's review as noted in Rogifan's post number 222, above.
  • Reply 228 of 228
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Good points. I had wondered about the GPU but wasn't sure that it didn't come with a discrete version. Also, what's up with USB? Isn't 3.0 part of that Ivy Bridge chipset? I do like the look of it and I'm glad it's metal and not plastic. Can't wait to see iFixit and AnandTech's review. Perhaps the nature of Chrome OS will make the HD4000 iGPU highly doable, hence their decision to go Retina.


    Yep. And why do you even need an i5 just to run a browser? ARM will do it just fine and use less battery. The hardware choices here don't make much sense.

Sign In or Register to comment.