Apple's iPhone 5 debuts on T-Mobile April 12 with $99 upfront payment plan

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  • Reply 81 of 103
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    I think it's the other way around. People want newer, faster, better things but with a $650+ phone that isn't subsidized you just hold onto it longer before it such a huge upfront cost. The subsidy model allows you to get that newer, faster, better more often.


     


     


    Not really. If I spend $130 a month on AT&T for a plan I can get on T-Mobile for about $60 a month, I will save a lot of money on T-Mobile. Do the math. The $130 multiplied by 24 months with the initial $199 for a 16GB iPhone 5 factored in comes to $3319. The $60 a month for 24 months with the whole $579 price of the 16 GB iPhone 5 factored in comes to $2019. That is a $1300 saving on T-Mobile over a comparable plan on AT&T. So, after a year, you could still sell your old iPhone, get a new iPhone, and come out ahead. 


     


    Note that T-Mobile isn't charging you the $649 retail price. It is charging you $579. 

  • Reply 82 of 103
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    tbell wrote: »

    Not really. If I spend $130 a month on AT&T for a plan I can get on T-Mobile for about $60 a month, I will save a lot of money on T-Mobile. Do the math. The $130 multiplied by 24 months with the initial $199 for a 16GB iPhone 5 factored in comes to $3319. The $60 a month for 24 months with the whole $549 price of the 16 GB iPhone 5 factored in comes to $1989. That is a $1330 saving on T-Mobile over a comparable plan on AT&T. So, after a year, you could still sell your old iPhone, get a new iPhone, and come out a head. 

    You keep saying this but I was on AT&T for over 5 years with an iPhone and never paid close to $100/month, much less $130/month. As I stated before, it's simply not accurate to find two comparable plans between two carriers and then pigeonhole every customer into them. It's just makes your argument look disingenuous. Now I know you're just trying to find even ground, but it's simply not reasonable when you have to ignore so many other reasons why one chooses a carrier. I rarely paid over $80 per month with AT&T and now pay about $90 with Verizon. Even if there is this pre-included tax thing with T-Mobile USA $50 + $20 is $70. That's less than $20 more per month for a weaker service (and I think that's for only 500MB for the T-Mo data plan). I spend more than that for dinner most nights and only 66¢ per day. That's not exactly what I consider a moment where my eyes turn to dollar signs and they pop out of my head cartoon moment.
  • Reply 83 of 103
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    A lot more areas than what? Their LTE coverage? image


     


    Like over their entire coverage area? AT&T wanted to buy T-Mobile for a reason. 

  • Reply 84 of 103
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    You keep saying this but I was on AT&T for over 5 years with an iPhone and never paid close to $100/month, much less $130/month. As I stated before, it's simply not accurate to find two comparable plans between two carriers and then pigeonhole every customer into them. It's just makes your argument look disingenuous. Now I know you're just trying to find even ground, but it's simply not reasonable when you have to ignore so many other reasons why one chooses a carrier. I rarely paid over $80 per month with AT&T and now pay about $90 with Verizon. Even if there is this pre-included tax thing with T-Mobile USA $50 + $20 is $70. That's less than $20 more per month for a weaker service (and I think that's for only 500MB for the T-Mo data plan). I spend more than that for dinner most nights and only 66¢ per day. That's not exactly what I consider a moment where my eyes turn to dollar signs and they pop out of my head cartoon moment.


     


     


    Look you can tailor plans in a lot of different fashions. In truth on T-Mobile I can get an iPhone plan for as little as $29 a month. This excludes any data (try that on AT&T, which makes you have a data plan with an iPhone). However, I am comparing the second lowest priced new T-Mobile plan that comes with unlimited everything (except with a 2GB cap on 4G data) that costs $60 a month with the lowest priced AT&T plan that comes with unlimited voice, unlimited texting, and the lowest allotment of data, which is 3GB.


     


    Go to AT&T's website. For an individual plan, the unlimited voice costs $69.99 a month. Add the lowest data pack available (the 3GB data pack), which is $30 a month. Unlimited texting costs an additional $20 a month. That costs $119.99 a month. Add in another $10 a month in taxes and fees. Can I make the plan cheaper? Sure, I can choose a 450 minute voice plan on AT&T for $39.99 a month. With the data pack and unlimited texting that still comes to $89.99 a month, excluding taxes and fees. I can make it even lower if I take away texting. That comes to $69.99 a month. On all four big networks, you might also qualify for an employer discount of some sort.


     


    However, as I mentioned before, I was comparing the advertised unlimited plans, which is hard to do because AT&T doesn't offer one anymore (so I had to settle for the closet comparable plans). I think my comparison was fair. Going by the currently advertised prices on both networks, it costs about $130 on AT&T for what you can get on T-Mobile for $60 ($80 if you add the phone in). Further, you get more on T-Mobile because you don't have a contract and you can use your phone as a hot spot. 


     


    As far as which Network is better, that really depends on where you live. I have tried Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, and AT&T. In Ann Arbor Michigan, T-Mobile is great. In two years, I have suffered one dropped call, and maybe the other phone was at fault. In parts of Northern Michigan, T-Mobile doesn't have many towers, but roaming is included in the monthly price, and you ride off AT&T's network with no problem. 


    More importantly, you can try T-Mobile's network out with simply the cost of a month's service. 


     


    Perhaps not to you, but for many, T-Mobile's plans are going to be a great deal. 

  • Reply 85 of 103
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    tbell wrote: »
    Perhaps not to you, but for many, T-Mobile's plans are going to be a great deal. 

    Sure, but no one denied that. Regional, MVNOs, and struggling carriers have always had to find ways to set themselves apart from the major carriers. This is not a new thing. This was the way it was with T-Mobile before the iPhone ever existed. My point still stands that you can't simply take two unlimited plans as proof that one carrier is better than another. You're just denying too many factors when you do that.

    Everything you're saying just sounds so weighted toward T-Mobile and against AT&T. You haven't once mentioned another major US MNO. You choose one plan and one carrier to compare. I see absolutely no objectivity on your part. No range of carriers and plans and thresholds that would make various carries be more and less attractive with different consumer choices. You even claim there is no contract with T-Mobile but that iPhone on T-Mobile you're pushing costs $20/month for 20 months. Again, as I've shown, i lose out if I move to T-Mobile.
  • Reply 86 of 103
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Sure, but no one denied that. Regional, MVNOs, and struggling carriers have always had to find ways to set themselves apart from the major carriers. This is not a new thing. This was the way it was with T-Mobile before the iPhone ever existed. My point still stands that you can't simply take two unlimited plans as proof that one carrier is better than another. You're just denying too many factors when you do that.



    Everything you're saying just sounds so weighted toward T-Mobile and against AT&T. You haven't once mentioned another major US MNO. You choose one plan and one carrier to compare. I see absolutely no objectivity on your part. No range of carriers and plans and thresholds that would make various carries be more and less attractive with different consumer choices. You even claim there is no contract with T-Mobile but that iPhone on T-Mobile you're pushing costs $20/month for 20 months. Again, as I've shown, i lose out if I move to T-Mobile.


     


    My comparison is based strictly on the advertised price of similar unlimited plans. I think I make that pretty clear. The other variables are too subjective to be useful (e.g. location, discounts, etc.). I choose AT&T and T-Mobile to compare for two reasons, first, their networks are similar (e.g. both use SIM cards), and second, they are the carriers I have the most recent experience with. I, however, did price unlimited plans on Sprint recently and a similar plan came out to $150 a month (without discounts). Further, what I say is intended to be weighted against AT&T because as a former customer I found it's service lacking, and based on it's current pricing and policies, still do. 


     


    Yes, I did say there was no contract, but in truth no carrier has a no contract plan. Instead, they have  month to month contract plans. As far as the $20 for 20 months go, that has nothing to do with the cellular service as you can cancel that at the end of the month. It is a separate contract. Further, you don't have to pay for 20 months. You can just give T-Mobile $549 and you own the phone, or you can pay it off in fewer months if you like.


     


    Moreover, you are critiquing me for focusing on price of similar advertised plans, something that clearly matters to me, but you make a sweeping subjective statement that T-Mobile has an inferior network while implying the plans aren't that good because you paid less for a different plan when you were with AT&T (as opposed to comparing the current plans). Yet, you claim I lack objectivity.

  • Reply 87 of 103
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    tbell wrote: »
    My comparison is based strictly on the advertised price of similar unlimited plans. I think I make that pretty clear. The other variables are too subjective to be useful (e.g. location, discounts, etc.). I choose AT&T and T-Mobile to compare for two reasons, first, their networks are similar (e.g. both use SIM cards), and second, they are the carriers I have the most recent experience with. I, however, did price unlimited plans on Sprint recently and a similar plan came out to $150 a month (without discounts). Further, what I say is intended to be weighted against AT&T because as a former customer I found it's service lacking, and based on it's current pricing and policies, still do. 

    Yes, I did say there was no contract, but in truth no carrier has a no contract plan. Instead, they have  month to month contract plans. As far as the $20 for 20 months go, that has nothing to do with the cellular service as you can cancel that at the end of the month. It is a separate contract. Further, you don't have to pay for 20 months. You can just give T-Mobile $549and you own the phone, or you can pay it off in fewer months if you like.

    Moreover, you are critiquing me for focusing on price of similar advertised plans, something that clearly matters to me, but you make a sweeping subjective statement that T-Mobile has an inferior network while implying the plans aren't that good because you paid less for a different plan when you were with AT&T (as opposed to comparing the current plans). Yet, you claim I lack objectivity.

    1) I'm criticizing your subjective view for being worded as objective.

    2) T-Mobile's network coverage for the iPhone 5 is inferior to other MNOs. That's a fact. Even T-Mobile USA says they only cover 7 cities and will have 100 million people covered by mid 2013 per their own marketing material, right? How is that not inferior to what AT&T, Sprint and Verizon currently offer. In no way does being inferior in one regard mean it's inferior in all regards just as you finding a plan that makes T-Mobile superior to another carrier make it superior in all regards. However, if your goal was to come to a diverse public forum to only talk about plans that interest you I certainly didn't catch that in your original comment.
  • Reply 88 of 103
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post


     


    Link??  We don't need no stinkin' link to backup claims !!!!  /s





    Link's no backup. He's the Hero.

  • Reply 89 of 103


    T-Mobile stands to benefit from this move due to cell coverage area technologies rolling out this year from companies like Alcatel-Lucent. Solavei will help bring love to T-Mobile both in the US and Europe. Don't miss out on the amazing perks due to the social sharing revolution set to grow more and more popular as well that relies on the individual for letting others know about these benefits. 


    Juan


    http://solavei.com/mobilepro


    http://mobilepro.sharesolavei.com

  • Reply 90 of 103
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    1) I'm criticizing your subjective view for being worded as objective.



    2) T-Mobile's network coverage for the iPhone 5 is inferior to other MNOs. That's a fact. Even T-Mobile USA says they only cover 7 cities and will have 100 million people covered by mid 2013 per their own marketing material, right? How is that not inferior to what AT&T, Sprint and Verizon currently offer. In no way does being inferior in one regard mean it's inferior in all regards just as you finding a plan that makes T-Mobile superior to another carrier make it superior in all regards. However, if your goal was to come to a diverse public forum to only talk about plans that interest you I certainly didn't catch that in your original comment.


     


     


    Pricing is not subjective, it is objective. Something either costs more or it doesn't. So, the fact that pricing is important to me is subjective, but the actual cost is objective. T-Mobile's advertised prices are objectively better period. 


     


    As far as the Network goes, you are making a blanket statement that you are criticising me about. For example, if I happen to live in one of those 7 Cities, T-Mobile's LTE network is great and maybe better then it's competitors. Engadet is reporting speeds 40Mbps down over three runs, with upload speeds hovering around 25Mbps.  More importantly, when is marketing indicative of actual performance? T-Mobile has HSPS+ fully rolled out and in many cases that will perform better than LTE. Network quality is based largely on where you live, what you are doing, and what equipment you are using. It can also be enhanced through equipment like indoor cellular towers, which T-Mobile is or at least was giving out free if needed. AT&T charges.


     


    Moreover, T-Mobile actually has LTE in more cities, it just isn't fully rolled out. For example, in the Ann Arbor area T-Mobile has LTE coverage, but there are dead zones where it will switch to HSPS+ or 3G. 

  • Reply 91 of 103
    bwinskibwinski Posts: 164member
    AND, those of us that got suckered in by the %u2018Move your iPhone over to us%u2019 program that ran over the last 3-4 months by T-Mobile, and shelled out almost a thousand bucks for an UN-LOCKED iPhone 5, NOW - WE%u2019RE SCREWED because the Hardware is NOT COMPATIBLE. AND neither T-Mobile OR Apple will step up and take responsibility for that screw up..

    Thanks clowns.. If you think I%u2019m buying another iPhone 5 just to get the OLD T-Mumble AWS network, you%u2019re just stone stupid.
  • Reply 92 of 103
    Full iPhone line up as in also the iPhone 5 32g and 64g?
  • Reply 93 of 103
    gwmacgwmac Posts: 1,802member


    whoops, posted in wrong thread

  • Reply 94 of 103
    macbook promacbook pro Posts: 1,605member
    bwinski wrote: »
    AND, those of us that got suckered in by the %u2018Move your iPhone over to us%u2019 program that ran over the last 3-4 months by T-Mobile, and shelled out almost a thousand bucks for an UN-LOCKED iPhone 5, NOW - WE%u2019RE SCREWED because the Hardware is NOT COMPATIBLE. AND neither T-Mobile OR Apple will step up and take responsibility for that screw up..

    Thanks clowns.. If you think I%u2019m buying another iPhone 5 just to get the OLD T-Mumble AWS network, you%u2019re just stone stupid.


    Why should Apple "step up and take responsibility?"

    Do you think companies "screw up" when they release new hardware such as the likely forthcoming next generation iPhone?
  • Reply 95 of 103
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


    Originally Posted by Bwinski View Post

    …those of us that got suckered in by… …T-Mobile…


     


    And this is their problem why?






    AND neither T-Mobile OR Apple will step up and take responsibility for that screw up..



     


    Well, Apple has zero responsibility in the first place, so I think you know who to contact.

  • Reply 96 of 103

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TexDeafy View Post





    Yes but what about LTE? StraightTalk doesn't offer LTE...


    Last time I checked, StraightTalk also prohibited tethering (aka, Mobile Hot Spot, aka Personal WiFi).  They talk about unlimited data, but in the fine print they say you are prohibited from using your phone as a modem (which is their 20th-Century way of saying no mobile hotspot).  There are many reports of people having their service terminated for using the hotspot feature of the iPhone or other smartphone.  And many of us do depend upon the hotspot as our main source of internet, so this IS a big deal.  I, for example, refuse to pay the cable pig.

  • Reply 97 of 103

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post


     


    Straight Talk uses ATT towers and iPhone 5 can be purchased then just monthly unlimited, cancel anytime.  In my area ATT provides great service.



    Don't forget VirginMobileUSA, which also has competitive pricing.  But beware that some areas do not have even 4G speed.  Some don't even have 3G and are limited to EDGE speed (2.75G) on Virgin.  Still, if you're a light data user, this may be a good option for you.

  • Reply 98 of 103

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    The 1700MHz frequency, branded as 4G but not LTE, is unique to T-Mobile among carriers, and allows iPhone users only very slow 2G connectivity. Given T-Mobile's relatively small customer base, Apple never moved to support T-Mobile's standard. Instead, T-Mobile has been working to switch much of its network to 1900MHz in order to allow iPhone connectivity. The company will be repurposing its 1700MHz band for 4G LTE.


    I would be very interested to know how T-Mobile is handling the "throttling" when you exceed your allotment of monthly data.  Do they simply restrict you to a slower band, such as 3G or EDGE?  Or do they cut you to a certain speed (what speed?) regardless of your frequency/technology? Or do they just arbitrarily cut you down to whatever the local network can handle at the moment to ensure that non-overage customers have full speed?  If it's the latter, then I wouldn't mind, but if it's the former, and they lock you to EDGE for the remainder of your month, then I would be disinclined to use their service.

  • Reply 99 of 103
    bwinskibwinski Posts: 164member


    I bought an un-locked, iPhone 5 from Apple in December. And NOW, T-Mumble and Apple are telling me that I have to buy another one to get all of the network I’m currently already on?? 


     


    NOT LIKELY.

  • Reply 100 of 103
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


    Originally Posted by Bwinski View Post

    I bought an un-locked, iPhone 5 from Apple in December. And NOW, T-Mumble and Apple are telling me that I have to buy another one to get all of the network I’m currently already on?? 


     


    NOT LIKELY.





    So don't do it. You knew exactly what you were purchasing when you purchased it, and now you know that you have another option available. This is no one's "fault".

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