Microsoft backing off Metro, plans boot-to-desktop mode for Windows 8.1

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 72

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by igriv View Post


     


    Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).



     


    Yes, I do.

  • Reply 42 of 72
    igrivigriv Posts: 1,177member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


     


    How is this unbelievable? Have you tried to actually do something with Microsoft Office and that Ribbon UI? I finally realized that you're supposed to take training courses to use Microsoft products. It's not supposed to be intuitive. PCs are supposed to make you feel stupid.



     


    I have never taken a course in Ribbon use -- it seems pretty reasonable. It's once you get past the ribbon that it gets obscure.

  • Reply 43 of 72

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post



    What is this - a collective mushroom day at AI forums?



    8.1 will have an option to boot to desktop directly, but default will be Modern Start Screen.



    Even if you select to boot to desktop, you will still have access to Start Screen and Charms.



    This is still Windows 8; only difference regarding desktop/Modern is that you will not need any of already available 3rd party "desktop-boot" options - this functionality will be included. Can't really figure out why most around here should care at all, but either way - get over it. Modern is here to stay, for (subjectively) good or bad.


     


    Whew. For a moment, I thought Microsoft had come to their senses.


    I am relieved to hear that they are still heading in the wrong direction with regard to the Windows UI. If they had brought back the Start Menu (as opposed to simply booting to the desktop), I might have thought they were backpedaling on Metro, but I am pleased to hear that they still want to pursue this strategy of making Windows annoying for non-tablet, non-touchscreen users.

  • Reply 44 of 72
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by igriv View Post


    Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).



     


    Do I use the what now?


     


    In other words, no.

  • Reply 45 of 72
    majjomajjo Posts: 574member
    igriv wrote: »
    I use Windows 8 also, and it's OK, but what ARE the improvements over Win 7?

    Much better task and resource monitor, more detailed file copy dialog, much improved multi-monitor support, native USB 3.0 and ISO mounting, a much better backup system, and hybrid hibernation mode (though honestly I upgraded SSDs when I moved to win8, and that probably has more to do with my improved boot times than the new hibernation mode). There are others that I can't remember off the top of my head right now, but those are the ones that make win7 feel dated.
  • Reply 46 of 72
    irnchrizirnchriz Posts: 1,605member
    majjo wrote: »
    Much better task and resource monitor, more detailed file copy dialog, much improved multi-monitor support, native USB 3.0 and ISO mounting, a much better backup system, and hybrid hibernation mode (though honestly I upgraded SSDs when I moved to win8, and that probably has more to do with my improved boot times than the new hibernation mode). There are others that I can't remember off the top of my head right now, but those are the ones that make win7 feel dated.

    That seriously sounds like the boilerplate response we got from our Fujitsu sales guy who wanted us to take windows 8 on a 50 desktop order. We laughed soooo hard in his face, Not one of those reasons is good enough to move from windows 7. And don't even mention windows server 2012 jeeesus...
  • Reply 47 of 72
    So far, so good. Now we just need the Start button back...
  • Reply 48 of 72
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by igriv View Post


     


    Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).



    I don't use it for launching apps, because they all fit in the dock anyway. But what it's good for is uninstalling apps bought from the MAS. The Mac App Store installs apps as admin so if you try to simply drag their icon to the trash you have to enter an admin password, but if you instead click the wiggly X in Launchpad you don't have to enter any password.

  • Reply 49 of 72
    umrk_labumrk_lab Posts: 550member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post





    So, what will happen to the "Win...", er, ah... "Tiles Everywhere" mantra?


     


     


    Let's dance !

  • Reply 50 of 72


    A Mac costs 3 x as much. Get lost ! Are you rich ?

  • Reply 51 of 72
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    Objectively bad. And I love that.

    I actually like Modern and use it on all 3 computers I frequent, so your "objective" is not my "objective", which makes both very "subjective". Yes there are quirks (like Shutdown and Restart) but all in all, I like it more that W7. Wouldn't upgrade across all my machines otherwise.
  • Reply 52 of 72
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    irnchriz wrote: »
    That seriously sounds like the boilerplate response we got from our Fujitsu sales guy who wanted us to take windows 8 on a 50 desktop order. We laughed soooo hard in his face, Not one of those reasons is good enough to move from windows 7. And don't even mention windows server 2012 jeeesus...

    That is fine, people often laugh at things they don't understand.

    Re Server 2012, well, you mentioned it already. Care to elaborate?
  • Reply 53 of 72
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    Whew. For a moment, I thought Microsoft had come to their senses.
    I am relieved to hear that they are still heading in the wrong direction with regard to the Windows UI. If they had brought back the Start Menu (as opposed to simply booting to the desktop), I might have thought they were backpedaling on Metro, but I am pleased to hear that they still want to pursue this strategy of making Windows annoying for non-tablet, non-touchscreen users.

    Looking at current trends, I wouldn't be surprised if, in a year time or so, non-touchscreen laptops and desktop monitors become minority compared to touchscreen counterparts.

    But I digress... story is that there will be Start Menu in Desktop mode, but users will also be able to open Modern Start Screen. I think some of current 3rd party solutions already have this, so it makes sense in a way... but how is MS going to do that or, eventually, is any of that is true, we'll have to wait a bit longer.
  • Reply 54 of 72
    mundtymundty Posts: 10member


    I know there's some Windows guys that come on here and make ignorant comments about OS X... but I think you're being a little hard on Microsoft.  For once, they are not only trying to be innovative but attempting to adapt to the market instead of standing still like they did from 1995-2007.  I'll admit Metro is clunky with a keyboard and mouse, and they really should have made a stronger effort to introduce a better multi-touch peripheral to support it.  But Metro isn't an entire failure, the built in Tiles and 3rd party apps like Netflix provide a more enjoyable experience than using the browser.  Again, the problem comes from the fact that Metro is not designed for a Keyboard+Mouse, and they should have added standard windows start button option for Business users.  Use Windows 8 with the Logitech Wireless Touchpad, and the experience is actually quite fluid.  It's not as good as OS X implementation of multi-touch, I don't think most people would argue with you there.  But for someone who's open minded about OS evolution in the coming years, it's not nearly as bad as some of you are making it out to be.

  • Reply 55 of 72
    Another innovation from Microsoft!
  • Reply 56 of 72
    vorsosvorsos Posts: 302member


    I move for a vote of No Confidence against Chancellor Metro.


     



    ascii View Post


    Apple have also been moving elements of their touch GUI in to their desktop OS don't forget. They have just been a bit more selective about it. In fact Launchpad is kind of a "start screen."



    A gentle and fast-loading overlay, from a single button. Couldn't be easier, and people who don't want it or don't know about it, never have to interact with it or look to 3rd party disabling solutions.


     



    igriv View Post


    Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).



    I use either the Dock or a quick Spotlight search, since Spotlight is optimized for no-mouse use (cmd-space, start typing, hit enter to launch the top result).


    [ninja edit] The Windows 7 start menu is actually good at this too.


     



    Mundty View Post


    I think you're being a little hard on Microsoft.  For once, they are not only trying to be innovative but attempting to adapt to the market instead of standing still like they did from 1995-2007. ...


    ... But for someone who's open minded about OS evolution in the coming years, it's not nearly as bad as some of you are making it out to be.



    This isn't grade school, where they get points for effort. Google may have mainstreamed the idea of hyping 'beta' products, but at least they didn't charge us for the privilege.


     


    Windows Phone 8 is somewhat ok, but Windows 8 PC should have seen another year or two of development and testing on non-engineers. I don't have a problem with the Metro concept per se, but its flawed desktop implementation, which is then forced on users. Basic functions are not obvious or intuitive, at least to regular humans. And it's completely unsuitable for any business or productivity environment. For a company who blasts iOS devices as only being fit for consumption and not creation...

  • Reply 57 of 72
    Windows is so big and clunky. Take a look at basic stuff. Want to change your screen saver? Here's a Windows 95 dialog to do it. The Windows control panel is the most difficult monolith to navigate, with its mixed interfaces, some dating back over 15 years. By comparison, look at OS X. System preferences is light and compact, and everything stays in one neat window. Microsoft keeps adding new interfaces so that the OS looks like an old house that's been renovated too many times. They need to rip it down and rebuild it.
  • Reply 58 of 72
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,755moderator
    In an apparent attempt to have its latest operating system better appeal to business customers, Microsoft reportedly plans to add a "boot to desktop" mode to its Windows 8.1 update, allowing users to bypass the Metro Start Screen.

    I doubt this will fix the problem because it will most likely be enabled by default. Microsoft will want that Store icon front and center much to the annoyance of the likes of Valve.

    I can see this UI making its way to the next XBox too.
  • Reply 59 of 72
    majjomajjo Posts: 574member
    irnchriz wrote: »
    That seriously sounds like the boilerplate response we got from our Fujitsu sales guy who wanted us to take windows 8 on a 50 desktop order. We laughed soooo hard in his face, Not one of those reasons is good enough to move from windows 7. And don't even mention windows server 2012 jeeesus...

    Well, I'm sorry you feel that way. The task manager and iso mounting were enough for me to upgrade to win8. And considering all that I gave up from win7 is one extra click at login and 1 extra click when searching for settings, I would upgrade again in a heartbeat.
  • Reply 60 of 72
    elmoofoelmoofo Posts: 100member
    I really don't understand anyone who'd want a computer with fingerprints and smudges all over it. So many of my co-workers' keyboards are absolutely disgusting... I can't wait to see what touch brings to their world.
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