Apple widens lead in US smartphone market as iPhone nears 40% share

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 43
    freddfredd Posts: 9member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by brianloftus View Post


    There are 136.7 million smart phone users.  1% of this is 1.367 million.  0.1% is 136,700


    March 2013 - Microsoft has 3% of 136.7 million or 4.1 million.


    3 months prior Microsoft has 2.9% of 125.9 millions users or 3.651 million users.


    In the last 3 months - there has been an addition of 10.8 million new smartphone users and 3% of this new group is 324,000.



    So close, but you clearly misunderstand the numbers. Comscore does not do market share.  It measures installed base ie 3% of all smartphone users in Q1 had Windows Phones.  2.9% in Q4 2012 had Windows Phones. 


     


    In Q4 2012 there were 3.61 million Windows Phone users, in Q1 2013 there were 4.1 million, so around half a million were added.

  • Reply 22 of 43
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    That's a stupid article, as shown in some posts.

    Every new OEM flagship is bigger than 4.5. It's somewhat recent, and already accounts for more than 10%.
    If Apple really wants iOS dominance (if), they must release another iPhone line with a bigger screen.

    What do you mean by somewhat recent? It seems like it's been years. Remember this includes tablets which were trying to get a foothold even before the iPad was announced, so unless there is a slding scale where large tablets only count when they are 12" or more I'd say that 10% after years of effort is neither recent or good, especially when the reports keep saying how the iPad market share keeps dropping.

    Why are tablets included anyway? It doesn't seem like the iPads segment is included when people complain about iPhone size yet they are included when Android numbers are brought in to show larger display sizes on Android? This does not compute for me.
  • Reply 23 of 43
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,453member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    So, based on the earlier report, can we agree that the share is:


     


    Apple Phones: 39%


    Comparable Samsung Phones: 2.2%


    Low-end Cr4p Samsung Phones: ~20%


    The REST: Whatever's left


     


    It's no wonder these bozos don't report their volumes shipped: the ASP must be too embarrassing to reveal. And no wonder that the iPhone outperforms these low-ends on just about every other metric that is measured out there.


    image



    But do you know how Comscore gets it's data, how reliable it is, etc. In other words what is their methodology and why should you trust it?


     


    /simage


     


    We all are more accepting of the stats we want to see and question the ones we don't. It's just human nature.

  • Reply 24 of 43
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,121member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    But do you know how Comscore gets it's data, how reliable it is, etc. In other words what is their methodology and why should you trust it?


     


    /simage


     


    We all are more accepting of the stats we want to see and question the ones we don't. It's just human nature.



    No, I don't, so I am happy to add the caveat, "if true." (Although, I honestly admit -- which is more than you guys will ever do -- it's fun for us Apple fans to pretend it's true!


     


    Of course, it would all go away if these Android-people didn't hide their numbers, and reported volumes shipped!image

  • Reply 25 of 43
    macky the mackymacky the macky Posts: 4,768member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fredD View Post


    Yes, it will pre pretty funny when the iPhone is reduced to a rounding error also as it has been in places like Spain. With iOS's plunging market share I would not be so glib about other operating systems with small market shares.



     


    Spain's unemployment rate is so high that toilet paper is an extravagance, and the illegal emigrants from Africa have a higher level of education. A good portion of the computers in Spain run Windows 3.1 so who needs a smart phone if a phone is only used to text and talk?? Hmmm?

  • Reply 26 of 43
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,453member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    No, I don't, so I am happy to add the caveat, "if true." (Although, I honestly admit -- which is more than you guys will ever do -- it's fun for us Apple fans to pretend it's true!


     


    Of course, it would all go away if these Android-people didn't hide their numbers, and reported volumes shipped!image



    I was just having a bit of fun and ragging you a little. I wasn't the least bit serious.

  • Reply 27 of 43
    damn_its_hotdamn_its_hot Posts: 1,185member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post


     


    That's a stupid article, as shown in some posts.


     


    Every new OEM flagship is bigger than 4.5. It's somewhat recent, and already accounts for more than 10%.


    If Apple really wants iOS dominance (if), they must release another iPhone line with a bigger screen.



     


    That is what you don't get -- it doesn't matter how many you ship, it does matter how much (in $ profit) you sell (ROI). As long as Apple can continue to make the profits they are making and sell large volumes of iPhones, iPads, MB, etc… their job is being done. If all they wanted was to have market dominance they could sell the iPhone at cost and pickup the numbers quick. Thats shooting yourself in the foot unless you sell some other very profitable add-on (50,000,000,000 downloads @ +$9 Billion is good but not enough).Microsoft sells the XBox for a loss cause they get a huge return on their software. The iPhone doesn't support that model.

  • Reply 28 of 43
    damn_its_hotdamn_its_hot Posts: 1,185member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sumergo View Post




    I know it's after 11:00 pm in Porto so maybe I'll try again with a quoted post.  Where are you for conversation Pedro?  ;-)


     


    Hey Pedro,


     


    This is from a previous post of mine:


     


    --------------



    • The latest iPhone size seems good to me - both "on the hand and at the ear".


    • An iPad mini with phone capabilities is a middle ground for those who want more screen size & telecoms.


    • Full iPad and telecoms (with speakerphone for conference capabilities).


     


    We surely don't need an excessive variety of screen sizes ranging from the usable to the bizarre do we?  How about:



    • One your wife can actually hold in her hand.


    • One which can sit on your lap, and,


    • Something in between for those who are still unsure.


     


    There's enough waste already without producing every "0.01" screen size variation that everyone might conceivable desire.


    --------------


     


    From a usability perspective, a phone is a device that "by definition" you can easily hold in one hand to talk.  Sure you may also be able to do more (surf, read etc), but as the interaction requirements between human and device expand, you are probably going to need more screen/interaction estate.


     


    As I say above - a phone is a phone - and it makes UX sense to keep it so as far as possible.  As interaction requirements increase, so does the screen size - the less it becomes a phone, the more it becomes a pad/laptop.


     


    Thoughts?

     





     


    I saw a women walking and talking with what must have been a 4.8" or 5.0" phone held up to her head. This was the first time I had seen someone (in the wild) actually using one of these  and I laughed out loud. The thing was huge! She was not a small women (just avg.). It looked ridiculous and the way she was holding it it looked like it was hard for her to see to her side -- kind of like a blinder. I just don't see the need personally.


     


    Different strokes...

  • Reply 29 of 43
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 715member
    So much good news about Apple. That means analysts will predict Apple is going to die again.
  • Reply 30 of 43


    Something always overlooked in these overarching discussions about marketshare dominance by device and operating system is user behavior.


     


    The degree to which iPhone users access electronic mail and browse the web if consistently two to four times greater than that of Android mobile device users. Far greater degrees of access to social media platform such as Facebook and Twitter, to blogs and to electronic commerce sites are also reported, both domestically and across the globe.


     


    The logic is inescapable: while Android mobile devices may predominate in many markets, their users are comparatively unsophisticated when contrasted with iPhone users. There are many factors in play, including Apple's unarguably more mature ecosystem.


     


    The salient point: in simplistic terms, an iPhone user is a more consistent and productive user from the point of view of of those driving social media, and those interested in the rapidly growing mobile marketing segment. Android mobile device users—to a far greater extent than iPhone users—simply employ their mobile handsets to talk and to send text messages.


     


    There are also carrier biases in play, manifesting themselves in the form of manufacturer and distributor incentives, staff marketing SPIFFs and other ploy which skew representatives toward the sale of a variety of Android platforms, and away from iPhones. In general, where available from a given carrier, the iPhone has historically 'sold itself' to a greater degree than Android mobile devices have.


     


    A great deal has been written about such user behavior, but I've only seen such articles appear in trade periodicals focused on marketing and social media, on and offline, and not in publications such as AppleInsider.


     


    If you take off your consumer hat for a moment and look at what the non-comsumer players driving the mobile industry are interested in, you begin to see why iOS, the iPhone and the the iPad and iPad mini have become—and, will continue to be—dominant components of this emerging sector. There is room for Android, Windows Phone and even the Blackberry OS, but all fall far short of the importance of the iPhone when you consider post purchase user behavior.

  • Reply 31 of 43
    Note to editor:

    I think you need to change
    "market growth of 0.7 percent, from 21.7 percent to 20 percent"
    -to-
    "market growth of 0.7 percent, from 21.0 percent to 21.7 percent"

    Thanks. It's ALL good news!
  • Reply 32 of 43
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,364member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post


     


    That's a stupid article, as shown in some posts.


     


    Every new OEM flagship is bigger than 4.5. It's somewhat recent, and already accounts for more than 10%.


    If Apple really wants iOS dominance (if), they must release another iPhone line with a bigger screen.



     


    Check.


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SCProfessor View Post


    Heck,  I am on your side with this one.



     


    Add another.


     


     


    That's 10% of an actual market Apple's leaving on the table.  When they have great options not to.


     


    I believes annual total world-wide device sales are in the hundred million or higher unit range, but take that for purposes of argument.  So grabbing half of that market would be five million devices (or many more - because Apple's strength is in the high end already) - priced $50-100 higher than the current 4" stretch model. 


     


    And still millions more, as many current iPhone users would pay the freight for it too. 


     


    Good for the top and bottom lines.  Great for market and mind share.  And happy customers with more choices. 


     


    Also, if the rumors of a cheaper iPhone model pan out, a high-margin, higher-priced large-screen model (OR just continue to deprecate the prices of preceding models as they do now, for that matter) would also balance out any margin or gross revenue drop-off as a result of releasing that device.  And in the process free Apple to be as aggressive on the low-end price as they want to in order to keep gaining share - particularly in the mostly unsubsidized developing world.  And then the whole smartphone device class is covered.


     


    (Unlocked iPhone 4's are priced at $450 and 5's start at $649 and I don't imagine the rumored device could be too much cheaper and still be a "real iPhone." But $349 for a poly model might be possible I suppose - and $299 might be a magic segment-penetrating number, but would simply have to compromise on components I'd strongly bet, i.e., lesser (processor, camera, etc., etc., e.g., some two gen old bits in a plastic shell. Does anyone know what mid-range Androids go for unlocked?)


     


    So anyway, wtf, what's not to like about that prospect?  You "ergonomics nazis" can still have your beloved one thumb wonders along with the rest of the talking points from keynotes past, and those of us who want iPhone quality with Apple support and all the other advantages of going AAPL with another choice of form factor can have what we want. 

     


    Again, one size don't fit all.  Which is why Apple still offers 6 distinct (and further configurable) laptop models.  So what makes two phone models too much to ask for from a company of Apple's size, chops, distribution channels, ecosystem, etc? 



    I just don't get where the opposition to this idea comes from....

  • Reply 33 of 43
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,285member
    That is what you don't get -- it doesn't matter how many you ship, it does matter how much (in $ profit) you sell (ROI). As long as Apple can continue to make the profits they are making and sell large volumes of iPhones, iPads, MB, etc… their job is being done. If all they wanted was to have market dominance they could sell the iPhone at cost and pickup the numbers quick. Thats shooting yourself in the foot unless you sell some other very profitable add-on (50,000,000,000 downloads @ +$9 Billion is good but not enough).Microsoft sells the XBox for a loss cause they get a huge return on their software. The iPhone doesn't support that model.

    Profit share is also falling. Margins are falling. And profits are static.

    This happens if you keep yourself at too high a price relative to a commodified market.

    And why wouldn't Apple want to dominate an industry they created?
  • Reply 34 of 43
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    you guys are so retarded (sometimes).

    USA.

    Would you be that surprise if samsung sells more S4 in the next quarter than Apple sells iphone 5? That's samsung alone.
    People want and like bigger screens.

    How would we know it's because of a bigger screen or just that the SGS 4 is a newer phone?
  • Reply 35 of 43
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    bigpics wrote: »
    That's 10% of an actual I market Apple's leaving on the table.

    How do you know that those people would've chosen a bigger screen iPhone? While there are a few that leave Apple for a bigger screen phone I would say it's a very small percentage of that 10%
  • Reply 36 of 43
    sacto joesacto joe Posts: 728member
    Good point, dasanman69. Also, There's the issue of usability. For me, an iPad is right at the edge of usability. But then, I have large hands. For people with smaller hands, the iPad Mini is optimal. Any smaller than that, and a stylus starts to become useful. I've managed to teach myself how to type on a smartphone, but it's not as easy or as fast as on my iPad. Siri helps a lot, of course, but if I had my preference I'd rather type than talk out loud and double check my work.

    Bottom line: If I was forced to cut corners, I'd keep my iPad and get a cheap phone, if it had Siri capability. Which is why I'm hoping for an iPhone Nano that doubles as a wristwatch.
  • Reply 37 of 43
    pedromartinspedromartins Posts: 1,333member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    How would we know it's because of a bigger screen or just that the SGS 4 is a newer phone?


    Because the S4 is shit on every single metric when compared to the iphone.

  • Reply 38 of 43
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    Something always overlooked in these overarching discussions about marketshare dominance by device and operating system is user behavior.

    The degree to which iPhone users access electronic mail and browse the web if consistently two to four times greater than that of Android mobile device users. Far greater degrees of access to social media platform such as Facebook and Twitter, to blogs and to electronic commerce sites are also reported, both domestically and across the globe.

    The logic is inescapable: while Android mobile devices may predominate in many markets, their users are comparatively unsophisticated when contrasted with iPhone users. There are many factors in play, including Apple's unarguably more mature ecosystem.

    The salient point: in simplistic terms, an iPhone user is a more consistent and productive user from the point of view of of those driving social media, and those interested in the rapidly growing mobile marketing segment. Android mobile device users—to a far greater extent than iPhone users—simply employ their mobile handsets to talk and to send text messages.

    There are also carrier biases in play, manifesting themselves in the form of manufacturer and distributor incentives, staff marketing SPIFFs and other ploy which skew representatives toward the sale of a variety of Android platforms, and away from iPhones. In general, where available from a given carrier, the iPhone has historically 'sold itself' to a greater degree than Android mobile devices have.

    A great deal has been written about such user behavior, but I've only seen such articles appear in trade periodicals focused on marketing and social media, on and offline, and not in publications such as AppleInsider.

    If you take off your consumer hat for a moment and look at what the non-comsumer players driving the mobile industry are interested in, you begin to see why iOS, the iPhone and the the iPad and iPad mini have become—and, will continue to be—dominant components of this emerging sector. There is room for Android, Windows Phone and even the Blackberry OS, but all fall far short of the importance of the iPhone when you consider post purchase user behavior.

    Great post that could've been greater had you posted a few links to the articles you referred to.
  • Reply 39 of 43
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    Because the S4 is shit on every single metric when compared to the iphone.

    How many people actually know about those metrics? Very few.
  • Reply 40 of 43
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,684member
    you guys are so retarded (sometimes).

    USA.

    Would you be that surprise if samsung sells more S4 in the next quarter than Apple sells iphone 5? That's samsung alone.
    People want and like bigger screens.

    Considering the 5 and 4 outsold/shipped the larger SG3 in the Dec qtr, yes it would be a minor surprise. But then again the 5 is 7 months old now.
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