Apple throws out the rulebook for its unique next-gen Mac Pro

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  • Reply 121 of 1320
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    jlandd wrote: »
    Yer nuts  :  )   Anything near that would make it a no brainer impulse buy for even people who don't need what it offers, and Apple has never done that.   
    He maybe nuts but I wouldn't be surprised to find Apple supplementing the high end model with an entry level model that addresses the high entry cost of today's Mac Pro.
    It'll be expensive enough to give pause to those who don't require it.
    As revealed most certainly but Apple will have more than one model. They have as much as said so using the "up to" phrase often.
     The current Mac Pro price comparison is pointless because there's been zero market for it for literally years given how we've been waiting for an upgrade since forever and MacBook Pros have come so far in the meantime.

    There will be more of a premium attached to it. 
    Premium? I certainly think Apple will maintain its margins, but this product is very interesting and has the potential for lower production costs than some might imagine. That doesn't mean cheap but I don't see this being that much more expensive than the current Mac Pro mechanicals.
  • Reply 122 of 1320
    The tractor beam is coupled to the main reactor in seven locations. A power loss at one of the terminals will allow the ship to leave. This is one of those locations.

    Finally tech that looks like it belongs on the Death Star. :-)
  • Reply 123 of 1320
    r1skor1sko Posts: 30member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jeff Fields View Post



    Details are wrong in several places about the ports.



    There are zero Firewire 800 ports, not two as stated in the article.

    There are four USB 3 ports; the article forgot to mention them.

    There are two Ethernet ports; the article is vague on this.


    Actually, Phill Schiller states in the keynote that Thunderbolt-2 ports are backwards compatible to Firewire....

  • Reply 124 of 1320

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by v5v View Post


     


    The design does LOOK goofy, but it allows for the most ingenious cooling system ever. It's hard to argue just because it ain't pretty.


     


    If an old fart like me can adapt, or more accurately recognize the way the industry is going, you can too! image



     


    Wait until you see how well it will keep your coffee hot and cook your Lean Cuisine lunch...!

  • Reply 125 of 1320
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    ascii wrote: »
    I agree. 2 years from now it will be "obvious" that a computer has two kinds of chip inside: RAM chips for temporary storage and Flash chips for permanent storage.
    Not only that but those RAM chips are going to go through an architecture change. Eventually even in the Mac Pro RAM will be soldered in.
    The idea that you would need a little box with a motor and spinning platters to store data will seem very 20th century. The reason this computer doesn't have HD bays is because, like many of Apple's products, it's simply from the future.
    That brought a smile to my face.

    However it would have been a very positive thing for Apple to have put in a second slot for their high speed SSDs.
    And I would just add, that having only Flash storage internally does not equate to your internal storage being unexpandable. You just expand it the way you always used to expand RAM, by taking out the old modules and putting bigger ones in.
    That is the other mystery, why do people believe a plug in card isn't upgradable?
  • Reply 126 of 1320

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post



    I hope some of the supposed experts replying here, understand the expandability of thunderbolt ports. Including, external PCI enclosures, with any PCI device you want to throw in there.


     


    I totally agree with you, but when one bleeds their account for a super computer they'd like to have more to show for it than a liter-sized can of Monster.

  • Reply 127 of 1320
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post



    I hope some of the supposed experts replying here, understand the expandability of thunderbolt ports. Including, external PCI enclosures, with any PCI device you want to throw in there.


     


    Unless that PCI device happens to be a video card, in which case you're screwed. Adding anywhere from $400-1000 to the price of the card is no bargain either.


     


    Don't get me wrong, I think we've reached a point in computer evolution that it may be okay to build a machine with no slots. I'm just saying either get a machine that has slots or live without 'em, 'cause the enclosures aren't a very flexible or cost-effective solution.

  • Reply 128 of 1320
    wozwozwozwoz Posts: 252member
    It's totes amazeballs ... I hope it is really quiet too. It's actually got similarities in concept to the original cube ... with flow-thru vertical air ... but unlike the cube, this has awesome power, fantastic graphics, and massive fast expandability via Thunderbolt. Love it.
  • Reply 129 of 1320

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mervynyan View Post



    looks like my plug hole



    That's what she said

  • Reply 130 of 1320


    This really deserves to be sitting on a desk. At 9.9" high and 6" wide with a very cool aluminum housing, it's beautiful. This is so next-gen that many people who are complaining just can't wrap their heads around how much power is in that little cylinder. Their main complaints? "no DVD drive!", "no HDD slot!", "no 3.5" drive!". This computer is completely pro because it has a fantastic base spec with tonnes of remote expansion so it can serve a wide array of people who can add to it to fit their needs. With thunderbolt 2, you'll see expansion SSD storage and maybe even remote graphic cards. If it runs three 4K monitors out of the box, it could probably run 16 normal 1080p monitors. Apple just made all other serious desktop computers look absolutely lame. Hmm...sounds familiar...like from 2007 when the iPhone came out.

  • Reply 131 of 1320

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post


    There doesn't seem to be anything stopping upgrading of RAM or for that matter the HDD. They aren't soldered on at all but are in reasonably standard slots from what I can see.


     


    The only thing that might put a spanner in the works is how easy is it to get into the case? It does look pretty easy but it remains to be seen.



     


    You didn't see the keynote, did you? Basically you just lift off the can and all the boards are right there. What is still unknown is whether the boards are soldered in or are cards you can switch out for upgrading.

  • Reply 132 of 1320
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,225member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SchnellFowVay View Post

    However, with the Mac Pro, I have never heard anyone clamoring for a smaller footprint, or for less expandability. 


     



     


    Now you have. I have dreamed of a small and super high compute box with super fast external I/O. My old (never upgraded beyond memory) old Mac Pro Dual G5 sits mostly unused. Upgrading Mac Pros has always been dodgy at best so why try to lie that they are highly configurable like a PC box?

  • Reply 133 of 1320

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by v5v View Post


     


    Unless that PCI device happens to be a video card, in which case you're screwed. Adding anywhere from $400-1000 to the price of the card is no bargain either.


     


    Don't get me wrong, I think we've reached a point in computer evolution that it may be okay to build a machine with no slots. I'm just saying either get a machine that has slots or live without 'em, 'cause the enclosures aren't a very flexible or cost-effective solution.



    This thing will drive three 4K displays...! It's about time you let go of that old 19" CRT display anyway.  image

  • Reply 134 of 1320
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member


    It is a thing of beauty.  I never thought about getting a Mac Pro until today.  The Pros are going to have competition at the line for buying these.  Consumers like me want this as well.  image

  • Reply 135 of 1320
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,225member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike Fix View Post


    If ASUS can make a dual LGA 2011 board, why can't Apple?


     


    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131817


     


    And this is why you'd want a dual socket motherboard...


     


    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Intel-Xeon-Ivy-Bridge-EP-Server,21972.html


     


    I think we'd all prefer 24 cores over 12....



    Did you read the reviews? I hope Apple does better than this board.

  • Reply 136 of 1320
    nchianchia Posts: 124member
    Is this the "My Ass" model?

    Would've loved to hear it from Jony.

    Wonder if Thunderbolt 2 is delaying it.
  • Reply 137 of 1320

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post


    "Doubling" down on your error of omission? :)


     


    I don't see anyone (except you) specifying Xeons.



     


    Nope. You were talking about what Apple "could have done" with Mac Pro, and Mac Pros use Xeons.

  • Reply 138 of 1320
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


    Says the commenter who cannot possibly have any idea how quiet, or how cheap, the new Mac Pro is, or is not …  


     


    … since the price hasn't been announced yet and no one has even seen one running yet. 



     


    ...and can't possibly be working a mini very hard, because that box is only quiet until you put it to work. Then it's a jet.

  • Reply 139 of 1320
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post


    BUT, since Pro Tools came out with their native version of Pro Tools, this system may bypass the need to buy the more expensive Pro Tools cards, and just run the Native software which makes it far more attractive price wise if the new system performs equally or better than a comparable tower using the Pro Tools cards, which are VERY expensive.



     


    Unless you work in surround like I do, in which case Pro Tools 11 takes us a step backwards and forces us to use a Pro Tools card, either Native or HDX. There's no host-based surround environment anymore since the Complete Production Toolkit has been discontinued.


     


    The minimum price of entry for surround with Pro Tools is now $6000. Ludicrous.


     


    Maybe I'll use my new Mac Pro to run Audition instead....

  • Reply 140 of 1320
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    This proves that Apple has done 100% the right thing.


     




    I don't think it actually proves anything. They managed to make all of us speculate, but it doesn't show any of us what it offers in the end. They changed directions on several things, so I want to see what happens in terms of developer support and Apple's own framework updates. A preview isn't enough information for me to form a concrete opinion. I can spot things I like or dislike. As for things like PCI, consider the place of thunderbolt in a notebook. The notebook has to be mobile, so some things will not fit. Here we have a case of where that's being leveraged back into the older solution. If you can fit all necessary non-backup storage internally, you have no need for a bunch of little boxes. It's just a derivative effect of the prevalence of notebooks as desktop replacements.


     



    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I agree.


     


     


    Interesting design. I probably won't buy one though. I was really looking forward to a new Mac Pro, just this isn't what I wanted. Personally I like the large case of the current design. With this new model, I can see a bunch of non-matching external chassis for hard disks, capture cards, optical media burners, etc, scattered around the desk connected by cables, all of which used to be neatly contained inside the tower.


     


    Pros:


    Faster


     


    Cons:


    Not expandable, ugly external accessories required



    I hate cables. As I said they're really leveraging peripherals designed with notebooks in mind. They're external for notebooks due to lack of space and access. Otherwise computing typically goes the direction of tighter integration. This goes against the flow to leverage things designed for what has become popular.


     


    Quote:


     I don't like the inlet vent on the bottom either. Too easy for it to be obstructed by cables, papers, etc.




     


    I missed that.


     


    Quote:




     


    Oh, and BTW the HTML5 animations on the Apple site promoting the Mac Pro are a perfect example of why HTML5 cannot come close to replacing Flash at least not for quality animation. All kinds of glitches, timing issues and jerky non-buffered animation. If that is the best they can do, it says a lot about the lack of capabilities of the HTML5 platform.




    I would agree about HTML5 and extend it to anything that employs javascript in general.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    There has never been a better time for Adobe to release Creative Suite for Linux. Personally I like big cases and motherboards that I can build to suit my needs. Hackintosh is probably not an option going forward, but neither is this new Mac Pro in my opinion. 4K video and thunderbolt are not exclusive to Apple. Premier is already 4K capable. TB2 will also be available on other boards around the same time.



    I've wanted a Linux Creative Suite for years. According to threads on Adobe's forum it will never happen, as their research suggests lack of suitable demand. My desire to run Linux is really just a desire for powerful hardware and a lean OS. As for 4K, it can be offered on Displayport 1.2. That has been out since 2010. Desktop display hardware tends to move slowly compared to smaller formats.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nht View Post


     


    The problem with the RAM is it dropped from 8 slots to 4 slots.


     


    The SSD probably isn't a standard format as the industry hasn't really settled on one.  Even within Apple machines there are SSB blade differences.



    16GB dimms may become cheap enough to be tolerable. That would at least get you to 64GB. They can't go sodimm to save space with ECC memory. I'm not sure whether it's a proprietary SSD format.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Ha Ha! There are many things that belong to past eras that are never appreciated by the new generation.


     


    Pros ask for a one ton 4x4 diesel truck and Apple delivers a solar powered hovercraft.  This Mac Pro was designed for modern hipsters, wanna be "Pros".



    I almost want to steal that line for a sig. It's great. I'm going to remain undecided until the machine is out for some time, and I know the exact cost of configuration and accompanying performance.

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