Editorial: What WWDC 2013 tells us about Apple

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  • Reply 81 of 142


    It would be nice if DED's byline appeared with the article when it is viewed from the FORUMS.  As it is now, when in forum view the only attribution is to "administrator".  One needs to view the article on the main AI pages to see who wrote it.  If this metadata is being kept separate from the text of the article, in 20 years, poor ol' DED might not get any credit at all for his archived writing!

  • Reply 82 of 142

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CustomTB View Post





    Wouldn't they both have to run on the same chip?


    No. Much has been made of LLVM technology that allows retargeting of code. The c programming language and Unix are good examples where different targets run functionally equivalent software ("equivalent" not "equal" -- in the mathematical sense). Oracle RDBMS, Java, Scheme, Haskell run functionally "equivalent" software on different chipsets. 

  • Reply 83 of 142
    19831983 Posts: 1,173member
    The best AI editorial I've read so far - so this site can write good'uns after-all!
  • Reply 84 of 142
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    ireland wrote: »
    No. No. No. Rather than themes they need to seriously consider the strong negative feedback on iOS 7. In the words of Gordon Ramsay, "I only care about negative feedback".
    Usually those the most negative speak the loudest. I'd be curious to know how much negative feedback Apple is really getting.
  • Reply 85 of 142

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Usually those the most negative speak the loudest. I'd be curious to know how much negative feedback Apple is really getting.


     


    Quantity is less important than understanding who, why, and what the negative feedback is.


     


    Apple listens to negative feedback (iPod Shuffle redesign backpedal, anyone?), but it has to reflect the needs of the broader population, not a particular (vocal) subset. And yes, the tech pundits and power users think they speak for everyone, but not always. I am not implying Apple dismisses any negative feedback just because it happens to be vocalized by a particular subset of users--not without understanding whether it is also shared by the broader population base.

  • Reply 86 of 142
    geojohngeojohn Posts: 11member


    The editorial is pure fluff, all about look, feel, marketing, branding, with a fawning tone.


     


    Where is the critical analysis? Were is Apple going? There is no substantial clue in the article.


     


    Where is analysis of the graphic design- color, typography, usability?


     


    Where is a critical analysis of functionality? After all, why buy a computer if not to use?


     


    I was looking for basic improvements in Mac OS and a few have indeed come, notably screen sharing (previously inept), how long has it taken?? Also a better Safari. 


     


    The progressive loss of functionality is disturbing, for example deprecation of the mouse to the trackpad which is near useless for graphic precision. The rise of the obnoxious in-your-face notification center with no easy way to turn it off so I can get on with the days work.  All this with removal of previous options such as unread mail numbers in the dock icon. Why not leave the original functionality and just add the new options?


     


    And no update to iWork since 2009, 5 years!!! And no hint that there will be any improvement to this software, though we get iCloud and iOS integration which is useless for any serious business use. One of the main failures of Apple is software which is patchy at best. Aperture, the Final Cut Pro debacle.


     


    And success or otherwise of the new Mac Pro will depend on professional take-up, not geeky admirers of the shape and shine. Difficulty of upgrade and customisation will strangle it, i.e. poor functionality, again.

  • Reply 87 of 142
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Quantity is less important than understanding who, why, and what the negative feedback is.

    Apple listens to negative feedback (iPod Shuffle redesign backpedal, anyone?), but it has to reflect the needs of the broader population, not a particular (vocal) subset. And yes, the tech pundits and power users think they speak for everyone, but not always. I am not implying Apple dismisses any negative feedback just because it happens to be vocalized by a particular subset of users--not without understanding whether it is also shared by the broader population base.
    Yep. Thing is developers are under NDA so it's hard to get an accurate picture of what people who are using it the most think. Rene Ritchie over at iMore seems to be excited, though he must be under NDA because he isn't saying a lot, just hinting.

    Apple has to be saving something for the iPhone/iPad launch later this year. Is that finger print sensor technology or maybe a game controller? In the developer sessions there seemed to be a big focus on UIDynamics and this whole physics engine. Will be interesting to see what 3rd parties do with this new OS and new API's.
  • Reply 88 of 142
    gwmacgwmac Posts: 1,797member


    I enjoyed this article. The only thing it lacked is some videos since you need that to really appreciate just what a punch iOS 7 packs.


     


    image


     


    image

  • Reply 89 of 142
    gctwnlgctwnl Posts: 277member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kicsike View Post



    I would like to comment on the following statement:

    "Macs aren't really priced significantly higher than generic PC's of similar built qualities and specs."

    It is not quite true, but in a different direction that one may think about.

    About four years ago when I switched from Windows PC to a Mac, a move I regret only for not doing it years earlier, I went on Dell's website and built a similar quality PC compared with the Mac Pro I had purchased. The Mac Pro was $100 more expensive, which compared to the $3000 something price is only 3%. This difference was a result of not being able to choose the 8GB DDR3 RAM memory for the Dell machine, only DDR2, since DDR3 was not available in the spring of 2009 for Dell.

    If I would have been able to choose DDR3 RAM memory for the Dell PC the price difference would have been probably nil.

    Half a year later I purchased an additional Apple computer, a 17 inch MacBook Pro.

    I did the same "exercise" as for the Mac Pro and my Apple laptop came out $100 cheaper than the comparably configured Dell laptop.

    So, my conclusion is: there is no price difference at all between Machines running the Apple OSX operating system compared tp machines running the Windows operating system.

    Or, if still there is, it's non significant.


     


    When I bought my iMac 27in in 2010 I also configured the same setup at Dell. To my surprise, the Dell came out way, way more expensive. It turned out after some research that Dell had a few sharply priced items with very limited specs, but as soon as you went to decent specs they became at least as expensive as Apple and in my case a lot more expensive. 

  • Reply 90 of 142

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by geojohn View Post


    The editorial is pure fluff, all about look, feel, marketing, branding, with a fawning tone.


     


    Where is the critical analysis? Were is Apple going? There is no substantial clue in the article.


     


    Where is analysis of the graphic design- color, typography, usability?


     


    Where is a critical analysis of functionality? After all, why buy a computer if not to use?


     


    I was looking for basic improvements in Mac OS and a few have indeed come, notably screen sharing (previously inept), how long has it taken?? Also a better Safari. 


     


    The progressive loss of functionality is disturbing, for example deprecation of the mouse to the trackpad which is near useless for graphic precision. The rise of the obnoxious in-your-face notification center with no easy way to turn it off so I can get on with the days work.  All this with removal of previous options such as unread mail numbers in the dock icon. Why not leave the original functionality and just add the new options?


     


    And no update to iWork since 2009, 5 years!!! And no hint that there will be any improvement to this software, though we get iCloud and iOS integration which is useless for any serious business use. One of the main failures of Apple is software which is patchy at best. Aperture, the Final Cut Pro debacle.


     


    And success or otherwise of the new Mac Pro will depend on professional take-up, not geeky admirers of the shape and shine. Difficulty of upgrade and customisation will strangle it, i.e. poor functionality, again.



     


    "deprecation of the mouse to the trackpad which is near useless for graphic precision" How is making the best trackpad in the world deprecating the mouse? Plug in a USB wireless mouse or bluetooth mouse and go!!


     


    "The rise of the obnoxious in-your-face notification center with no easy way to turn it off so I can get on with the days work." Go to settings, go to notification center (2 clicks total). Now spend 3 minutes and fine tune the apps you want showing up in notification centre or remove them all if you want. 3 freakin minutes!!!


     


    "All this with removal of previous options such as unread mail numbers in the dock icon" Are you making this up? The mail app shows unread mail in the dock icon. It never went away.


     


    "Difficulty of upgrade and customisation will strangle it, i.e. poor functionality, again." Welcome to 2013 where Pros can add remotely the devices they want via Thunderbolt 2 instead of having a giant box with many bays that half the pros will never use.

  • Reply 91 of 142

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Yep. Thing is developers are under NDA so it's hard to get an accurate picture of what people who are using it the most think. Rene Ritchie over at iMore seems to be excited, though he must be under NDA because he isn't saying a lot, just hinting.



    Apple has to be saving something for the iPhone/iPad launch later this year. Is that finger print sensor technology or maybe a game controller? In the developer sessions there seemed to be a big focus on UIDynamics and this whole physics engine. Will be interesting to see what 3rd parties do with this new OS and new API's.


     


    The game controller SDK is huge. Not sure what it portends, but it's a sign that Apple is getting serious about iOS as a mainstream game platform. The iPod Touch/iPhone embedded in a controller sleeve together with Dual Screen gaming via $99 Apple TV should give Sony pause. Nintendo too. While the Vita has impressive mobile hardware, it's a sitting target for the rest of its existence, while Apple will keep pushing more power into the A-series chips each year. MFi controller support would open up iOS devices to much more mainstream type of games, not just games adapted to touch screen controls.

  • Reply 92 of 142

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoshMcCullough View Post



    I thought this article was annoying and biased so I stopped reading. Then I realized it was from AppleInsider and now it all makes sense!


    You were a standout in the slow class, weren't you?

  • Reply 93 of 142

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


    And if OS X is now going to be named after famous California locales, then do you think that we'll see Mac OS X Hollywood? What else? Mac OS X Beverly Hills or maybe just Mac OS X 90210? Mac OS X Brentwood (OJ murders)? Mac OS X South Central?


     


    Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing Mac OS X Humboldt County.image



     


    No, I expect Apple to stick the California surf spot theme, my bet is on OS X Rincon, OS X Santa Cruz, OS X Malibu, etc.

  • Reply 94 of 142
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    rayz wrote: »
    A well-researched, well-written, well-presented article. What the hell's it doing here?

    I was pointing out to someone that the IOS app switcher was lifted from WebOS. They disagreed, saying that the IOS task switcher was simply the IOS Safari page switcher repurposed. His argument was that Palm simply used the Safari page switcher for something else. Not sure if I agree, but I can see his point.

    Look up Apple HyperCard. It is very similar to WebOs' application switcher. Apple abandoned it years ago, and the patents likely have expired.
  • Reply 95 of 142
    applesauce007applesauce007 Posts: 1,607member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post


    Actually, Solaris is also BSD based and SUN was co-founded in 1982 by the main programmer behind Berkley Software Distribution, Bill Joy. NeXTSTEP didn't come into the picture till 1987, with a commercial ready product in 1989, NeXT Computer, i.e. The Cube.



     


    Well Sun OS was 100% BSD derived but Solaris was based on SVR4. (System 5 Release 4)


    SVR4 is a combination of System V, BSD and Xenix put together by AT&T and Sun Microsystems. 

  • Reply 96 of 142
    richard getzrichard getz Posts: 1,142member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post



    My wife and I own an iPad and an Ipad Mini.

    We refer to them as the Maxi Pad and the Tampon.


     


    So stupid! image

  • Reply 97 of 142
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kicsike View Post



    So, my conclusion is: there is no price difference at all between Machines running the Apple OSX operating system compared tp machines running the Windows operating system.

    Or, if still there is, it's non significant.


     


    Apple dropping the 17" MBP and dragging their heels on incorporating USB3 pissed me off (I sat on a USB3 I/O device for over a year before I could finally use it with a Mac) so I went looking for alternatives. I found that a similarly equipped Asus was actually a few hundred bucks cheaper, while offering USB3 instead of USB2 and a Blu-Ray burner instead of DVD.


     


    My take-away was that price was similar enough to not matter, but that Asus did a better job of keeping up with technology while Apple seemed more interested in telling me what I do and do not need to do my job -- "No one uses optical anymore" and "Blu-Ray is a world of hurt" (SO?! If that's what my clients want, let ME decide whether it's worth the pain or not!) and "Why do you need USB3 when you have Thunderbolt?"


     


    But I digress...


     


    I agree that prices for "pro" hardware are similar across brands, but there are differences. Other brands are better than Apple when it comes to zeroing in on customization preferences. Apple has the advantage of OS X. For me, the latter matters.


     


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post



    [...] The MP lasts way longer, and parts can be upgraded, which also makes it the cheapest Mac Apple has to offer.


     


    Which parts can be upgraded? The only one I can identify is the power cord! image Oh, and the RAM sticks.


     


    As for longevity, there's really no way to know yet since it hasn't yet been released. Because it employs a completely new approach to cooling, it would seem prudent to wait and see. (Note: I really LIKE the new cooling scheme and suspect it will probably be a huge improvement, but you never know FOR SURE until it spends some time in the wild.)

  • Reply 98 of 142
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,657member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Noway Bro View Post


     


    No, I expect Apple to stick the California surf spot theme, my bet is on OS X Rincon, OS X Santa Cruz, OS X Malibu, etc.



     


    You're probably right. I'm from the opposite coast, and to be honest, I'd never even heard of Mavericks before.

  • Reply 99 of 142
    bigdaddypbigdaddyp Posts: 811member
    kicsike wrote: »
    I would like to comment on the following statement:
    "Macs aren't really priced significantly higher than generic PC's of similar built qualities and specs."
    It is not quite true, but in a different direction that one may think about.
    About four years ago when I switched from Windows PC to a Mac, a move I regret only for not doing it years earlier, I went on Dell's website and built a similar quality PC compared with the Mac Pro I had purchased. The Mac Pro was $100 more expensive, which compared to the $3000 something price is only 3%. This difference was a result of not being able to choose the 8GB DDR3 RAM memory for the Dell machine, only DDR2, since DDR3 was not available in the spring of 2009 for Dell.
    If I would have been able to choose DDR3 RAM memory for the Dell PC the price difference would have been probably nil.
    Half a year later I purchased an additional Apple computer, a 17 inch MacBook Pro.
    I did the same "exercise" as for the Mac Pro and my Apple laptop came out $100 cheaper than the comparably configured Dell laptop.
    So, my conclusion is: there is no price difference at all between Machines running the Apple OSX operating system compared tp machines running the Windows operating system.
    Or, if still there is, it's non significant.

    I had a similar experience back in 06 comparing my iMac to the other all in ones. At that time, not only was the iMac cost competitive, but actually had better hardware for the money. I think where you you are a bit off on the pricing though, is when a Mac is nearing a refresh. Sine Apple doesn't usually change prices between refreshes, at the end of a models run, Apples prices can be higher than their competitors. I know, small nits that I am picking.
  • Reply 100 of 142
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,164member
    davebarnes wrote: »
    My wife and I own an iPad and an Ipad Mini.
    We refer to them as the Maxi Pad and the Tampon.

    Well, whatever turns you both on. Please spare us your family scatology.
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