Editorial: What WWDC 2013 tells us about Apple

123468

Comments

  • Reply 101 of 142
    curtis hannahcurtis hannah Posts: 1,756member
    Yes macs cost a lot(with a lot of features with them for bonus) as for Mac OS is extremely powerful compared to windows, and IOS edges android for power
  • Reply 102 of 142
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member

    Quote:


    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

     


    The de-emphais on OS X version numbers may be a reflection of the fact that changes now occurring to OS X are not flashy, cyclical shifts designed to sell to a mass market audience (as they formerly have been in past releases)



    I don't think I've ever seen Prince so sweepingly critical of Apple before.   Is this a recent shift of opinion, or was he that critical at the time of those releases he now feels were just fluff?

  • Reply 103 of 142
    conrailconrail Posts: 489member

    Quote:


    Microsoft's "Vista" and Google's Android "Honeycomb" also seemed like odd names when they were first released, but nobody cares about them now



     


    I never thought Vista was a bad or odd name for an OS.  I actually kind of liked the name.  It was the OS that was garbage.


     


    Android release names, however, are amateurish and silly.  Will the one after Jellybean be Krispy Kreme or Kentucky Fried Chicken?

  • Reply 104 of 142
    conrailconrail Posts: 489member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


     


    You're probably right. I'm from the opposite coast, and to be honest, I'd never even heard of Mavericks before.





    Me either.  I imagine they will go with the less touristy sounding names. 

  • Reply 105 of 142
    correctionscorrections Posts: 1,345member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


    I don't think I've ever seen Prince so sweepingly critical of Apple before.   Is this a recent shift of opinion, or was he that critical at the time of those releases he now feels were just fluff?



     


    Alas, in your desperation to twist things you've failed to grasp the point.


     


    OS X has most certainly offered "flashy" features in "cyclical shifts designed to sell to a mass market audience," back when the Mac was Apple'e primary product. Things like Photo Booth, iChat AV/iChat Theater, Dashboard widgets and 3D Time Machine. There's nothing wrong with these things now or then, they were just evidence of Apple pushing regular new updates it once sold for $129. Apple was selling OS X as a product itself.


     


    Today, Apple is upgrading OS X, and does so at nominal cost. It's $29. And OS X Mavericks appears to be the most serious, streamlined release yet. There's very little flashy feature focus, and instead it's getting quite restrained and overtly functional apps. Maps, iBooks, streamlined new Finder and Safari. 


     


    The flash is (at least for now) being reserved for iOS, which is being targeted more toward the entry level consumer market.


     


    It's not a value judgement, it's an observation of what's happening. 

  • Reply 106 of 142
    totemstotems Posts: 17member
    Ask any real estate agent if they'd rather sell luxury houses to the affluent or cardboard boxes to homeless people.

    This is offensive to me. I'm homeless
  • Reply 107 of 142
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Corrections View Post



    It's not a value judgement, it's an observation of what's happening.


    Thanks, Prince, for sharing with us that you believe your opinions to be distinct from others' by being the only ones which somehow aren't opinions at all, the only words which can describe how the world is.   Bravo.  I know a few folks at Cupertino who feel a bit differently about their work, but hey, all they have is their opinion....

  • Reply 108 of 142
    droidftwdroidftw Posts: 1,009member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Conrail View Post


     


    I never thought Vista was a bad or odd name for an OS.  I actually kind of liked the name.  It was the OS that was garbage.


     


    Android release names, however, are amateurish and silly.  Will the one after Jellybean be Krispy Kreme or Kentucky Fried Chicken?



     


    Key Lime Pie.  (This isn't a joke post, that's really what they're calling it.)

  • Reply 109 of 142
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,576member
    I wholly disagree with the author on this one point at least. OS X and iOS will merge. I'd bet my life on it.

    ...

    In short, nothing is more certain than the merging of iOS and OSX.

    Without a timeframe (not even a, "within my lifetime.") it's a sucker bet, and an empty prediction.

    But, were you to say, "within the next 10 years," with an expectation that you'll live longer than that, I think you'd be a very unhappy man 10 years from now if you got anyone to take that bet.

    This claim essentially asserts that Apple will have s single OS that runs on, and behaves the same across, all their platforms and on which an app written for any platform will run on all of them. I wouldn't bet a plugged nickel that that will happen within the next 10 years.
  • Reply 110 of 142
    pendergastpendergast Posts: 1,358member
    totems wrote: »
    Ask any real estate agent if they'd rather sell luxury houses to the affluent or cardboard boxes to homeless people.

    This is offensive to me. I'm homeless

    You're offended? And yet the point stands.

    By the by, the point's focus was on the agent's preference, not a judgement of the potential customer. Just a fact.
  • Reply 111 of 142
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    What Apple has done in the past and is clear about is that OS X is designed for desktops and laptops, and iOS is for mobile devices. Sure, Apple will leverage both OS technologies to co-exist and work together and may eventually have similar attributes in design, but they are two different OSs from a hardware/device standpoint. I don't think there will be only one OS anytime in the near or even long term because they are completely different needs and uses.

    But I would expect that eventually OS X may look similar to iOS and still leverage features as time goes on, but they still are different enough to not warrant combining into one OS.

    I think the iPad is going to get significantly more powerful once Apple migrates from 32 bit to 64 bit processing in terms of what can be done from a software perspective, but still different markets than the desktop/laptop markets.
  • Reply 112 of 142
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


     


    I like that line. image


     


    Most Android phones are cardboard boxes. All netbooks are cardboard boxes. Macbook Air ripoffs are cardboard boxes. iMac ripoffs are cardboard boxes. Almost every tablet made besides an iPad is a cardboard box. And the people who buy those things represent the homeless people. 


     


    I've said this before, but I thought that this was one of Apple's best keynote's in a while.


     


    And if OS X is now going to be named after famous California locales, then do you think that we'll see Mac OS X Hollywood? What else? Mac OS X Beverly Hills or maybe just Mac OS X 90210? Mac OS X Brentwood (OJ murders)? Mac OS X South Central?


     


    Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing Mac OS X Humboldt County.image



    I think you might want to not relate Android as only for homeless people.  There are homeless people that actually use iOS devices.  The Android market are predominately people that don't have or don't spend much money on mobile devices, and they may not be able because of their income levels or the fact that Apple simply doesn't market with every carrier in every country.  A lot of China Mobile users can't use Apple yet.  Once Apple signs on China Mobile, then their sales will go up and market share will also increase.  But I do know people that have been homeless or don't have much money buy Apple products.


     


    Yes, I agree, it was one of Apple's best Keynotes in a while.  The new version of OS X and iOS are much more interesting, plus they had the new MacBookAirs, which was a product refresh using several new technologies as well as a sneak peak at the MacPro.  I'm still wondering if Apple shot themselves in the foot by not having PCI slots in the new MacPro and not having internal drive cages since a large number of Pros have the desire to have things internally and need PCI slots for various cards.  As cool as the box is, I'm wondering if they are going to lose some Pros in the process.  The external Thunderbolt PCI expansion chassis are very noisy and Apple can't address those products and the Pros that work in the audio and video production industry require quiet running equipment since they work in specially designed rooms where unwanted noise is a must.


     


    Yeah, I'm wondering what they are going to do with future locales?  Big Sir, Shasta, Tahoe, Napa, Northstar, Bear Mountain, Heavenly, Boreal, Sierra, Yosemite, Mammoth, Mendocino, Palm Beach, San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Palo Alto, Hollywood, Cupertino are some potential names they could use, but actually, just using the moniker of the version number might be the only thing they need.  I wonder if they are going to 10.10, or if they will do OS XI release 1.0.

  • Reply 113 of 142
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post


     


    Key Lime Pie.  (This isn't a joke post, that's really what they're calling it.)



    I heard their next release is 4.3.x and it's still called Jelly Bean.  Still.  Key Lime Pie is 5.x.x

  • Reply 114 of 142
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,240member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jessi View Post


    I think the new Mac Pro will come in a "mini" flavor.  That is to say, I think it's a reasonably economical platform.  So they can make the high end that they showed off, but by simply replacing the GPUs & CPU, they can make a cheaper version.  I wouldn't be surprised to see models as cheap as $1,299 (with more pedestrian CPUs and maybe a single GPU)



     


    Not immediately, but eventually, yes this formfactor has the potential to (and therefore will) filter down across lower and lower price points with each iteration.


     


    If the rumors of Apple 27-inch "retina" panels are to be believed displays are about to get extremely expensive. A 4K display purchased this year will likely exceed most users computing requirements for years to come. I'm sure the will also be prohibitively expensive to include them in the iMac lineup for now. Too many people would buy one retina iMac and hold onto it for years. Apple needs a way to decouple the display purchase from the computer purchase so the user doesn't have to shell out for the cost of a new display each time. A thunderbolt 2 driven "retina" display is a no-brainer. Traditional towers don't really fit Apple's business model in that consumers can buy cheaper individual components elsewhere instead of spending money on a new computer. Apple sort of managed this by making the previous Mac Pro bulky, heavy and (most of all) expensive. Basically as unappealing to non pro-consumers as it could be. The Mac Pro doesn't suffer from any of those problems. Sure it is upgradeable - There are 6 thunderbolt ports - but I sincerely doubt an external graphics card over the thunderbolt interface would be nearly as efficient as one soldered to the motherboard. With 4K the GPU is soon to become the system bottleneck all over again. Apple has that critical Achilles heel to prompt users to upgrade. All is well in the universe.

  • Reply 115 of 142
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    Here's Apple's cover flow for album art.

    <iframe width="640" height="385" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>



    Here's a video of WebOS app switching.

    <iframe width="640" height="385" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>



    Anything look familiar? The current item is more prominent while the other Apps (WebOS) or albums (cover flow) are off to the side and smaller. Albums (Apps) zoom in when they're in the middle ready for selection or actions. And cover flow was around long before anyone heard of WebOS.

    Now take a look at iOS 7 task switching.

    <iframe width="640" height="385" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>


    It's different from cover flow and WebOS. All the "cards" representing each App are the same size and simply scroll side-to-side with none of the zooming effects of cover flow or WebOS. The big difference is Apple has added icons below the cards. I'm not sure why Apple removed the "zooming" effect where the current App is more prominent.

    Regardless, it's pretty clear WebOS got their idea from cover flow. Now take cover flow and rotate it 90 degrees. What do you get? Gee, I don't know, kinda looks like Safari tabs maybe?



    Irrelevant. All the Android losers who post here don't have a clue and whenever they say "Android had this first" they're really pulling ideas from stock Android, Touchwiz, Sense or any other App they happened to see run on an Android device and attributing that feature to Android as a whole.

    $1 Million question: so where do you think CoverFlow was inspired from?
    A: HyperCard - designed be Bill Atkinson in 1987 for Apple.

    First CEO of Palm? Donna Dubinsky. Where did she work before Palm? Apple and Claris.

    Lead engineer and founder of Palm? Jeff Hawkins. Expertise? Handwriting recognition software for both Palm AND for Newton.

    Fact: almost every road in computer tech has passed through Cupertino and Apple at one time or another.... and UI/GUI design does NOT take place in a vacuum or white room with no influences from the past.

    Thanks to you and DED for pointing this out.

    I was going ballistic last week from every single outlet saying Apple lifted design references from MS or Google... when in fact MS and Google were/are scrambling about trying to copy Apple's successes.

    Not only with the devices, but the main interaction GUI... which let's never forget, was 'perfected' and brought to the masses by no other company than Apple.

    For pundits to think that Apple is so disorganized that they don't have probably the best research library on campus... OF THEIR OWN WORK with GUI's over the years, is to be just blind to what continues to make Apple the absolute top tech innovation company on the planet.

    Apple's internal Keynote's contain their OWN work and what to add or the best way to approach a design decision. They do NOT include a side-by-side comparison and footnotes, "we should be more like Android or Microsoft".

    As SJ said once upon a time about the birth of the iPhone and iOS: "we pulled it off our shelf and said, "hey... this would make a great phone these days with the chips and hardware at our disposal. Let's do something with this".

    He did not say, "we need to compete against Windows CE/Phone 5 or WebOS... and certainly not against Andy "Android" Rubin. (Apple Inc., manufacturing engineer, 1989 – 1992. General Magic, engineer, 1992 – 1995. An Apple spin-off where he participated in developing Magic Cap, an operating system and interface for hand-held mobile devices.) :p

    The above is just one of the main actors in the "Road-trip Movie" called "Mobile Computing: Who REALLY Did It First and Where Did They Get Their Ideas From?".
    Temporarily rated "R" due to the moderator's continued use of the F-Bomb pointing out how stupid, uneducated and lazy pundits are, that they can't even use search for background info. :no:

    <Edited to add> IDEA
    Hey DED: the above idea of writing a "Roadmap to Mobile" would be right up your alley! (Sorry for all of the puns! :smokey: )
  • Reply 116 of 142
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    @Dunks and @drblank;

    Re: MacPro

    So you've seen the WWDC video with Mari, running on a new MacPro with [B]3[/B] 4k monitors? You took note of the Mari developer's reactions, quote,

    "We have never seen Mari run this fast EVER!"

    So what are you guys doing anyway that would cause the new MacPro's to stutter and jump?

    The Pro's of today do not have ANYTHING at their disposal even half way similar to what the MacPro will offer. So... how the heck do they KNOW now what they need or want for the new MacPro in the Fall? How they KNOW that their won't be TB break-out boxes? How do the KNOW that there will be a bottle-neck... IF THEY HAVE NEVER seen, demoed, or used anything close to the MacPro with 6x 20gb Thunderbolt?

    And finally: where do you get the idea that you guys have more tech knowledge than the engineers at Apple... and specifically Bob Mansfield. Who BTW was bribed with an 8 figure "Please Stay and Finish This Project" salary? I guess TC should have contacted you instead, huh?

    :no: and :no: to both of you !
  • Reply 117 of 142
    thepixeldocthepixeldoc Posts: 2,257member
    One last post:

    I personally here on AI stated that this WWDC was going to be, my quote, "Jaw-dropping awesome and revolutionary".

    Trust me: I know these things! :D... and :smokey: for good measure.
  • Reply 118 of 142
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member
    I wholly disagree with the author on this one point at least. OS X and iOS will merge. I'd bet my life on it.

    Devices like the iPad will continue to become more powerful and the technologies embedded will continue to require additional capabilities in iOS. iDevices functionality will continue to make its way to MBA and vice versa, in particular. This means OS X will gain some of the functionalities in iDevices. The core of both OSes are Unix. Additional improvements in Unix will need to be made, like moving OS X core Unix closer to a real-time OS.

    In short, nothing is more certain than the merging of iOS and OSX.

    Nothing is more certain than, "You're an idiot!" You won't be missed any more than Windoze 8.
  • Reply 119 of 142
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,293member
    ireland wrote: »
    No. No. No. Rather than themes they need to seriously consider the strong negative feedback on iOS 7. In the words of Gordon Ramsay, "I only care about negative feedback".

    Most of the negative feedback is misinformed rants by designers who have skin in the game. The easier buttons are to design the fewer designers needed.

    We aren't seeing the final iOS 7 look here, no more than we have the final OS. Most of your criticisms are probably due to that fact. Except typography that's final (and adjustable, so I don't see the issue) and the use of text in back buttons. The text running into text is just a bug, border less text is here to stay. Personally I love it - apps which use the old format seem crude now - and there is another benefit - swiping left anywhere goes back one level. Once you learn that you get to love it.

    On depth - it's a mismatch. The switch button has a shadow and other buttons don't. I think there should be more shadows - between title bar content. Subtle - one pixel or two - hairline shadows.

    Mostly it's great.
  • Reply 120 of 142
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,293member
    danielsw wrote: »
    Nothing is more certain than, "You're an idiot!" You won't be missed any more than Windoze 8.

    He won't be missed because he thinks that iOS and OS X will merge? Where's he going?

    Post reported. Also this site has moved on from insulting trolls or anti-Apple posts to insulting people with different opinions. Often people with low posts attacking people with much higher posts, sometimes for bring "trolls". That has to stop.

    As for the argument - those of us who think iOS and OS X will merge really mean the APIs will merge not that you can install the Finder on an iPhone. And Apple is making many new frameworks immediately compatible with both OSes. You can write a game now for both OSes with game controller input which will work on either - just a recompile. If you need to handle touch on one and keyboard on the other then you need to worry about Appkit and UIKIT. But both are mostly the same framework, with NS renamed to UI, and non commonality in input and other minor areas.
Sign In or Register to comment.