iPhones much more likely to be stolen, less likely to be broken or need replacement

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,064member

    No, it's iPhone loss.  Financial loss is part of it, but I didn't say it was the only thing, which seems to be what you're implying I said.

  • Reply 43 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,284member
    milkmusic wrote: »
    Yada yada. . .

    That poster might be a real example of a paid shill and not one of the imaginary ones. Not claiming he factually is tho. :\
  • Reply 44 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,064member

    Not a particularly good one; why'd he post that in here?

     

    Possibly a robot.

  • Reply 45 of 66
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Less likely to REPORT broken phones. That phrasing is key.

    Until we stop shaming phone-breakers, these incidents will continue to go unreported.
  • Reply 46 of 66
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    nagromme wrote: »
    Less likely to REPORT broken phones. That phrasing is key.

    Until we stop shaming phone-breakers, these incidents will continue to go unreported.

    The reports would go way up if they added 'Angry Girlfriend/Wife' to the causes list. :lol:
  • Reply 47 of 66
    ipenipen Posts: 410member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post





    Please demonstrate how to bypass Activation Lock.

     

     

    I  don't think it's appropriate here on AI.

    Just type "bypass Activation Lock" in your browser search box and you'll see many "how to".

  • Reply 48 of 66
    macbook promacbook pro Posts: 1,605member
    ipen wrote: »

    I  don't think it's appropriate here on AI.
    Just type "bypass Activation Lock" in your browser search box and you'll see many "how to".

    I can't find a single method that actually bypasses the Activation Lock on iPhone 5S.
  • Reply 49 of 66

    The device cannot be powered back on without your passlock. If you took the time to learn how to enable restrictions (particularly the one that restricts the part about not being able to disable find my iphone) your thief would not have been able to disable it!

  • Reply 50 of 66
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    brunzilla wrote: »
    The device cannot be powered back on without your passlock. If you took the time to learn how to enable restrictions (particularly the one that restricts the part about not being able to disable find my iphone) your thief would not have been able to disable it!

    So how do you enter your passlock if the device doesn't power on?
  • Reply 51 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,064member

    I assume he means it can't be unlocked without a passcode, even after a restart, power cycle or attempted wipe (which needs your iCloud account if Activation Lock is on) or anything else similar.

     

    Maybe the thief never did get access to the iPhone.  Maybe it was locked forever after, and the thief had nothing but a chunk of glass and aluminium for the efforts.

     

    Doesn't help the victim of theft, they're still an iPhone down.  iPhones are still getting stolen.

  • Reply 52 of 66

    Yes, they are down an iPhone. Hence, there is an insurance plan possibly, through your service provider. But unless you do not elect that option, then there isn't much you can do if you haven't taken all the proper procedures to track your phone.

    Hint: There are apps that take a picture each time there is a failed attempt to unlock the phone, and it emails and uploads the photo to your iCloud account.

  • Reply 53 of 66
    murrayscmurraysc Posts: 13member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Brunzilla View Post

     

    The device cannot be powered back on without your passlock. If you took the time to learn how to enable restrictions (particularly the one that restricts the part about not being able to disable find my iphone) your thief would not have been able to disable it!


     

    I assume this was directed at me...

     

    I guess I'm missing your point.  I just tried turning off Find My iPhone on the new phone which was restored from a backup of the first (so same "restrictions").  It required the passcode to unlock and asked for my iCloud password to disable Find My iPhone.

     

    I know you suggested that I take the time to learn, but perhaps you could save me that time by educating what additional "restrictions" are needed??

     

    I'm assuming that we or the cell company disabled Find My iPhone because the timing was about the same as far as I can tell.

  • Reply 54 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,064member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brunzilla View Post

     

    Hint: There are apps that take a picture each time there is a failed attempt to unlock the phone, and it emails and uploads the photo to your iCloud account.


     

    There are?  How can that possibly work without a jailbreak?

  • Reply 55 of 66

    Take a look on the web. Read some articles.

    I would suggest you restrict your email settings as well.

  • Reply 56 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,064member

    Can't find anything that doesn't require jailbreaking, as expected.

  • Reply 57 of 66

    Try Private Photo Vault.

    Big Brother.

    Hidden.

  • Reply 58 of 66
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    brunzilla wrote: »
    Try Private Photo Vault.
    Big Brother.
    Hidden.

    Which of those take a photo every time there is a failed unlocking of the device, not the 3rd-party app that also has an PIN pad.
  • Reply 59 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,064member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Brunzilla View Post

     

    Try Private Photo Vault.

    Big Brother.

    Hidden.


    No, none of these do what you claim.  They offer app level security, but nothing on the lock screen.  

     

    It is impossible for an app to take control of the lock screen and trigger actions on a failed unlock attempt on an iOS device that hasn't been jailbroken.

  • Reply 60 of 66
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    crowley wrote: »
    No, none of these do what you claim.  They offer app level security, but nothing on the lock screen.  

    I<span style="line-height:1.4em;">t is impossibl</span>
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">e for an app to take control of the lock screen and trigger actions on a failed unlock attempt on an iOS device that hasn't been jailbroken.</span>

    But that's not a bad reason for me to consider jailbreaking my phone again. My only reservation is trusting a developer that isn't Apple to not be recording my access. That said, even if I did trust a 3rd-party developer I doubt that any have access to TouchID, which is how I unlock my phone so it's a moot point but I'm still going to send on this message anyway because I have already typed it out.
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