iPhones much more likely to be stolen, less likely to be broken or need replacement

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 66
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,799member
    A failure with TouchID is probably still exposed to a developer of jail brake apps without giving them any access to the fingerprint or hash.

    I don't disagree, this would be great functionality to have, and increases the value of jail breaking.
  • Reply 62 of 66
    murrayscmurraysc Posts: 13member

    I just realized while unlocking our old ATT iPhones that Find My iPhone needs to be disabled to restore from backup and the email that I received from Apple regarding FMiP being disable probably applied to the new phone, not the stolen phone.

     

    I guess I can have some piece of mind 8-)

  • Reply 63 of 66
    emesemes Posts: 239member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Both Google's Android and Microsoft's Windows Phone lack any mechanism for similarly blocking reactivation of a stolen device by thieves

    Erm, it is possible to remotely lock Windows Phones

  • Reply 64 of 66
    bondm16bondm16 Posts: 141member

     iPhone users are 11% less likely to request repairs. That suggests that, despite a delicate appearance, iPhones either are less prone to damage or their users take better care of them (or a mix of both)

     

    I've seen a few people with iPhone's with broken screens. I wonder whether the you should consider the fact that some people cant be bothered to fix a broken screen and just make do. 

  • Reply 65 of 66
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    bondm16 wrote: »
     iPhone users are 11% less likely to request repairs. That suggests that, despite a delicate appearance, iPhones either are less prone to damage or their users take better care of them (or a mix of both)

    I've seen a few people with iPhone's with broken screens. I wonder whether the you should consider the fact that some people cant be bothered to fix a broken screen and just make do. 

    The statement is about the frequency of requesting repairs so those with broken devices shouldn't be considered. This goes for devices from all vendors. Anecdotally, I've seen a lot more busted Android-based (and Windows) devices that customers seem to be perfectly fine using with a poor experience. It's almost like Stockholm syndrome. The only time I really ever hear about people using a defective Apple device on internet forums and I usually say have Apple take a look at it.
  • Reply 66 of 66
    bondm16bondm16 Posts: 141member

    Ironically before I had my Galaxy S2 and my current phone, Galaxy S3, I had an iPhone 1 followed by an iPhone 3Gs. My two Android phones have not broken down, had any parts replaced or have any damage on them of any kind. Where as my iPhone 1 needed a repair to the power button and my 3GS developed a screen fault and ended up being replaced entirely when the fix attempt in store made it worse.

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