Former Apple marketing exec talks Steve Jobs, Apple as product 'launch machine'

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 80
    perfect!
  • Reply 22 of 80
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    And Apple hasn't exaggerated some in its Siri commercials? They've been sued a few times over it. Fact is every company lies and manipulates some in their ads.

    Anyone can be sued for any reason at any time so that's not proof of Apple actually lying. It's possible they have been done something in an ad that was considered inaccurate — a UK ruling that caused ads to be taken off the air for being too fast comes to mind — but lying isn't common. However, trumping up positive aspects of a product whilst hidden negative aspects, as well as using clever language are common but those aren't lies. They may be deceptive and potentially unethical if taken too far but I don't recall Apple doing that.
  • Reply 23 of 80
    jbhoulejbhoule Posts: 20member
    Comparing Samsung's marketing to Apple's shows the difference between informing and selling.

    Samsung goes the hard sell route, from their advertising to the bounties/spiffs paid to retail sales people.

    Apple's advertising is soft and informative, sometimes humorous, sometimes emotional, sometimes rather serious or inspiring. It's the same at the retail level, where Apple Store employee's ask questions to understand the customer's needs, demonstrate and explain (show and tell), and answer questions. There is no arm twisting. It's product education, before and after a customer makes a purchase.
  • Reply 24 of 80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    Hrmmph... Lest anyone forget, Steve Jobs hated marketing people.

     

    Did you watch the video with Allison Johnson?  Do you think Steve Jobs hated Allison Johnson?

  • Reply 25 of 80
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Does no one know the answer to what I assumed was a well-worn joke?
  • Reply 26 of 80
    solipsismx wrote: »
    But how do you get to Carnegie Hall?

    First, you must be born as Andrew Carnegie...
    Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his very poor parents in 1848.

    Carnegie started as a telegrapher and by the 1860s had investments in railroads, railroad sleeping cars, bridges and oil derricks. He built further wealth as a bond salesman raising money for American enterprise in Europe. He built Pittsburgh's Carnegie Steel Company, which he sold to J.P. Morgan in 1901 for $480 million (the equivalent of approximately $13.6 billion in 2013), creating the U.S. Steel Corporation.

    Carnegie devoted the remainder of his life to large-scale philanthropy, with special emphasis on local libraries, world peace, education and scientific research. With the fortune he made from business, he built Carnegie Hall, and founded the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, Carnegie Hero Fund, Carnegie Mellon University and the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, among others. His life has often been

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Carnegie
  • Reply 27 of 80
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Does no one know the answer to what I assumed was a well-worn joke?

    Come on, go for the obvious: practice, practice, practice!

    If nothing else, I know old jokes!

    Question of the day: Is a Selfie a form of of masturbation?
  • Reply 28 of 80
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Anyone can be sued for any reason at any time so that's not proof of Apple actually lying. It's possible they have been done something in an ad that was considered inaccurate — a UK ruling that caused ads to be taken off the air for being too fast comes to mind — but lying isn't common. However, trumping up positive aspects of a product whilst hidden negative aspects, as well as using clever language are common but those aren't lies. They may be deceptive and potentially unethical if taken too far but I don't recall Apple doing that.

    The operative word was exaggerate.
  • Reply 29 of 80
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Does no one know the answer to what I assumed was a well-worn joke?

    The well worn answer was too easy.
  • Reply 30 of 80
    dsddsd Posts: 186member

    Practice, practice, practice. Then turn left at Greenland.

  • Reply 31 of 80
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Come on, go for the obvious: practice, practice, practice!

    I was starting to think it was one of those weird phenomenon where you assume something is common knowledge but you realize no one knows what you're talking about which leads to the internal question about your sanity.

    dasanman69 wrote: »
    The operative word was exaggerate.

    This where it's too abstract to be considered a lie. One could say that Apple's iconic 1984 ad was a lie because IBM/MS was in no way the Orwellian company that was portrayed. Or one could say that it's unethical to use humans to represents the Mac and PC or have a heartwarming ad about the iPhone or iPad about family members connecting in a touching way and never once represent the bathroom use that these devices commonly get.
  • Reply 32 of 80
    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
    dsd wrote: »
    Practice, practice, practice. Then turn left at Greenland.

    Greenland? Greenland?… That's where you mass your armies to win at Risk!
    isk!
  • Reply 33 of 80
    irelandireland Posts: 17,799member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by deepkid View Post

     

    Disagree. You can educate and be persuasive without directly asking for a purchase.


     

    Yeah, totally not selling anything here, move along. Haha.

  • Reply 34 of 80
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    dsd wrote: »
    Practice, practice, practice. Then turn left at Greenland.

    Ugh I took the left at Pismo Beach and ended up in Hoboken. That's close enough to Carnegie Hall, no? :lol:
  • Reply 35 of 80
    irelandireland Posts: 17,799member

    Guys, you're all mixing words. It's selling. You want to see. The only thing about Apple is the reason it doesn't seem desperate is you're selling a great product. And most products just plain suck. Most whole companies suck.

  • Reply 36 of 80
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Come on, go for the obvious: practice, practice, practice!

    I was starting to think it was one of those weird phenomenon where you assume something is common knowledge but you realize no one knows what you're talking about which leads to the internal question about your sanity.

    Something about thee and me…
  • Reply 37 of 80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    Does no one know the answer to what I assumed was a well-worn joke?

    I know the answer, but it was so obvious that I didn't think it needed answering: "Practice, practice, practice... But then it would have helped if you had included the name of the violin player as part of the joke... I liked it anyway. :)

  • Reply 38 of 80
    swissmac2 wrote: »
    The interview from Behance's 99U conference, first spotted by Cult of Mac, Johnson described her time at Apple...
    Comparing about the two techniques...
    It was a really interesting an important technique.
    His core leadership team, product and marketing leadership team was sitting around the table,
    This is not the company I want to be.
    Did he deeply care about that company and was it one in the same as him?

    Every one of these sentences from the article contains grammatical errors; not spelling errors, which anyone can make, but serious mistakes about how the English language is written! The words that should have been there are:
    In, ____, and, were, Apple, and.

    How can anyone take you seriously if you make such stupid errors?

    Content trumps grammar... As it should!
  • Reply 39 of 80
    ireland wrote: »
    Guys, you're all mixing words. It's selling. You want to see. The only thing about Apple is the reason it doesn't seem desperate is you're selling a great product. And most products just plain suck. Most whole companies suck.

    With due respect, what you are missing is the motivation/investment/risk to determine what people need, want and will buy -- in spite of what these people think they need, want and will buy!
  • Reply 40 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

     

    Guys, you're all mixing words. It's selling. You want to see. The only thing about Apple is the reason it doesn't seem desperate is you're selling a great product. And most products just plain suck. Most whole companies suck.


    Steve Jobs was the same age as me.  I remember growing up here in California, and one of my rock music heroes (Frank Zappa) lectured us and said advertising was fundamentally evil.  He said they were tricking us into buying shit we absolutely did not need and would not make our lives better.  I don't know if Jobs was a Zappa fan, but I'm convinced Jobs sincerely believed his products would make people's lives better.  

     


    Ireland is right, they're all selling.  And I think he's right that the difference between selling a great product and a shitty product is important.  I ask, is the seller telling the truth and does he sincerely believe his product will be good for us?  Or is the seller trying to deceive us so that he can separate us from our money?   I think this is the distinction Steve Jobs made.
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