Former Apple marketing exec talks Steve Jobs, Apple as product 'launch machine'

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by delreyjones View Post

     

     

    Did you watch the video with Allison Johnson?  Do you think Steve Jobs hated Allison Johnson?


     

    I hate Allison Johnson and I don't even know her.

     

    The story goes like this, but keep in mind I heard it third-party. Allison worked for the marketing department, but her job was making sure there was plenty of coffee and juice in the room where ideas were pitched about products and promotions. One day while a heated meeting was going on, she was cleaning up the pile of crumbs around the bagel cutter - it was a mess!

     

    Someone shouted out that the unreleased MBA should have rounded edges like the MBP. During the quiet lull after that statement, Allison picked up the well-used bagel slicer and said, more to herself (albeit too loudly), "I think it needs sharper edges."

     

    And that, my friends, is how she moved up from being the marketing's coffee lady.

  • Reply 42 of 80
    swissmac2swissmac2 Posts: 216member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post





    Content trumps grammar... As it should!

     

    Except the content is pretty weak, and the mistakes made are those one learns not to make at age 8 or 9. But you carry on playing cards, one of the few pursuits where not being able to communicate is an advantage...

  • Reply 43 of 80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

     

     

    I hate Allison Johnson and I don't even know her.

     

    The story goes like this, but keep in mind I heard it third-party. Allison worked for the marketing department, but her job was making sure there was plenty of coffee and juice in the room where ideas were pitched about products and promotions. One day while a heated meeting was going on, she was cleaning up the pile of crumbs around the bagel cutter - it was a mess!

     

    Someone shouted out that the unreleased MBA should have rounded edges like the MBP. During the quiet lull after that statement, Allison picked up the well-used bagel slicer and said, more to herself (albeit too loudly), "I think it needs sharper edges."

     

    And that, my friends, is how she moved up from being the marketing's coffee lady.


    Heard it 3rd party, eh?  I'm thinking the creator of that story has quite an imagination, albeit an unattractive imagination.

  • Reply 44 of 80
    My first exposure to Steve Jobs:

    Early 1979: I was doing a demo in our Sunnyvale store, to about 30 people, about what [B]you could do[/B] with an Apple ][.

    Steve was in the crowd behind me and called out "that's all wrong!".

    Steve came up and gave the best demo of what the Apple ][ could [B][I]do for you…[/I][/B]

    I was selling, successfully… But Steve was marketing… Really successfully!
  • Reply 45 of 80
    Selling is [I]harvesting[/I] -- Marketing is [I]sowing[/I]!
  • Reply 46 of 80
    joncojonco Posts: 25member

    Tell the cabbie "881 7th Ave" and step on it .

  • Reply 47 of 80

    Selling is forgetting that people have wants and needs. For example a man walks into a hardware store and asks for a quarter-inch drill bit. A sales man will assume the customer needs a quarter-inch drill bit - after all, that's what he asked for.

     

    In fact, the customer doesn't need a quarter-inch drill bit; what he really needs is quarter-inch holes. He knows the hardware store doesn't sell quarter-inch holes, so he phrases his request in the form of a want, which, in his mind, is the way to get what he really needs. Proper questioning might reveal that the customer needs to put quarter-inch holes in sheet metal at the rate of 100 a minute; a quarter-inch drill bit is not what he wants, what he needs is a pneumatic punch.

     

    It may seem like semantics, but customers often phrase their wants in terms they can imagine and not reveal their needs. Jobs once said something to the effect, "Customers don't know what they need until they see it. Our job is to give them what they need but didn't know it until we show it to them." (or something to that effect).

     

    What made the iPhone so astounding is that no one that I knew of was asking for a phone without keys. Yet, when everyone (except Steve Ballmer) saw the iPhone, they said to themselves, "Well, of course!"

  • Reply 48 of 80
    Selling is forgetting that people have wants and needs. For example a man walks into a hardware store and asks for a quarter-inch drill bit. A sales man will assume the customer needs a quarter-inch drill bit - after all, that's what he asked for.

    In fact, the customer doesn't need a quarter-inch drill bit; what he really needs is quarter-inch holes. He knows the hardware store doesn't sell quarter-inch holes, so he phrases his request in the form of a want, which, in his mind, is the way to get what he really needs. Proper questioning might reveal that the customer needs to put quarter-inch holes in sheet metal at the rate of 100 a minute; a quarter-inch drill bit is not what he wants, what he needs is a pneumatic punch.

    It may seem like semantics, but customers often phrase their wants in terms they can imagine and not reveal their needs. Jobs once said something to the effect, "Customers don't know what they need until they see it. Our job is to give them what they need but didn't know it until we show it to them." (or something to that effect).

    What made the iPhone so astounding is that no one that I knew of was asking for a phone without keys. Yet, when everyone (except Steve Ballmer) saw the iPhone, they said to themselves, "Well, of course!"

    Well reasoned, and well said!
  • Reply 49 of 80

    Looks suspiciously like Robert Smith of The Cure.

  • Reply 50 of 80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post



    Steve came up and gave the best demo of what the Apple ][ could do for you…

     

     

    Make beeping sounds and display 6 colors (orange, blue, green, purple, black, white)?

  • Reply 51 of 80
    Looks suspiciously like Robert Smith of The Cure.

    LOL ... Have you no shame?
  • Reply 52 of 80
    Steve came up and gave the best demo of what the Apple ][ could do for you…

     

    Make beeping sounds and display 6 colors (orange, blue, green, purple, black, white)?

    Ahh.. Hires graphics.... no, that was Tog!
  • Reply 53 of 80
    ksecksec Posts: 1,569member

    That is why now many are calling Sales & Marketing, when you go out and close down the deal. You are a Sales, and if not, you are marketing it.

     

    But those are slightly different with Apple. And from a world's common understanding point of view with Sales and Marketing. Both are about pushing for sales. Which differences differentiated by its results. By when did you see Apple stuff "pushes" for sales? They dont. ( Or Generally dont ) By Rather they teaches you the experience, the value etc. You could Do what ever you want in Apple Store and walk away without being ever get pushed to buy one thing.

     

    Instead they pushes for experience and value, and the why and how behind everything they do. And that pulls in people and buying with more sales and loyal customers.

     

    And it is more like indirect sales and marketing.

  • Reply 54 of 80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JBHoule View Post



    Samsung goes the hard sell route, from their advertising to the bounties/spiffs paid to retail sales people.

     

    Don't forget their paid shills in online forums.

  • Reply 55 of 80
    ksec wrote: »
    That is why now many are calling Sales & Marketing, when you go out and close down the deal. You are a Sales, and if not, you are marketing it.

    But those are slightly different with Apple. And from a world's common understanding point of view with Sales and Marketing. Both are about pushing for sales. Which differences differentiated by its results. By when did you see Apple stuff "pushes" for sales? They dont. ( Or Generally dont ) By Rather they teaches you the experience, the value etc. You could Do what ever you want in Apple Store and walk away without being ever get pushed to buy one thing.

    Instead they pushes for experience and value, and the why and how behind everything they do. And that pulls in people and buying with more sales and loyal customers.

    And it is more like indirect sales and marketing.

    Now that's jazz!
  • Reply 56 of 80
    kibitzerkibitzer Posts: 1,114member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

     

    Selling is forgetting that people have wants and needs. For example a man walks into a hardware store and asks for a quarter-inch drill bit. A sales man will assume the customer needs a quarter-inch drill bit - after all, that's what he asked for.

     

    In fact, the customer doesn't need a quarter-inch drill bit; what he really needs is quarter-inch holes. He knows the hardware store doesn't sell quarter-inch holes, so he phrases his request in the form of a want, which, in his mind, is the way to get what he really needs. Proper questioning might reveal that the customer needs to put quarter-inch holes in sheet metal at the rate of 100 a minute; a quarter-inch drill bit is not what he wants, what he needs is a pneumatic punch.

     

    It may seem like semantics, but customers often phrase their wants in terms they can imagine and not reveal their needs. Jobs once said something to the effect, "Customers don't know what they need until they see it. Our job is to give them what they need but didn't know it until we show it to them." (or something to that effect).

     

    What made the iPhone so astounding is that no one that I knew of was asking for a phone without keys. Yet, when everyone (except Steve Ballmer) saw the iPhone, they said to themselves, "Well, of course!"


    One of the great and often-taught examples of what you're saying is the Polaroid camera. Before it came onto the market, people didn't realize that they really wanted near-instant photographs. Photographers (amateurs especially) accepted the reality at the time; that there was some waiting involved from when they took their photos until negatives were developed, then prints made and processed and finally the finished photos were put into their hands. Edwin Land showed them a solution for what have previously been an accepted limitation in photography. The Polaroid camera was a product that answered a previously unperceived need.

  • Reply 57 of 80
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Did you watch the video with Allison Johnson?  Do you think Steve Jobs hated Allison Johnson?

    He hated marketing. I've no idea how he felt about Allison Johnson.

    "People don’t know what they want until you show it to them. That’s why I never rely on market research."

    And a quote pulled from a recent story:

    "“There was just a total hush,” Farag recalls. “No one was going to fess up to being the moron in the room. Eventually I said, ‘Well, this was asked for by the marketing division. It’s a multi-button mouse. It’s been approved through Apple’s process channels, and so we’ve been working on it.”

    Jobs stared at him.

    “I’m Marketing,” he said. “It’s a marketing team of one. And we’re not doing that product.” With that, he turned and stalked off."
  • Reply 58 of 80
    Hrmmph... Lest anyone forget, Steve Jobs hated marketing people.

    Yeah, he much preferred marketing Macs.

    Sorry.
  • Reply 59 of 80
    ireland wrote: »
    I hate to be the one to state the obvious, but that is selling the product. You can word it anyway you want, but it's still s spade.

    Shades of grey, maybe, but significant shades.

    Do you want Microsoft's breakdancing Surfaces to educate you? Or Apple's recent 'Communicate' ad last Christmas?
  • Reply 60 of 80
    swissmac2 wrote: »
    The interview from Behance's 99U conference, first spotted by Cult of Mac, Johnson described her time at Apple...
    Comparing about the two techniques...
    It was a really interesting an important technique.
    His core leadership team, product and marketing leadership team was sitting around the table,
    This is not the company I want to be.
    Did he deeply care about that company and was it one in the same as him?

    Every one of these sentences from the article contains grammatical errors; not spelling errors, which anyone can make, but serious mistakes about how the English language is written! The words that should have been there are:
    In, ____, and, were, Apple, and.

    How can anyone take you seriously if you make such stupid errors?

    I just watched the video. Great interview.
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