New video footage shows initial demolition at Apple's Campus 2 site

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2014
High quality video footage of the demolition currently underway at Apple's Campus 2 build site in Cupertino, Calif., was posted to the Web on Monday, with the short clip showing what appears to be the complete teardown process of an entire building.

Demolition
Source: YouTube user "Apple Internal"


The video, uploaded to YouTube by an unknown user posting under the name "Apple Internal," clearly shows the demolition of a building located along Ridgeview Ct., one of the main arteries running through the site.

Judging by the footage, the video was likely shot sometime last year when initial demolition of the old Hewlett-Packard campus began. Apple received final approval to go ahead with plans to demolish existing structures in November of 2013.

More recent aerial photos of the area published earlier in March show a barren construction site with almost every building razed to the ground. Also gone are the concrete roadways, trees and other installations, leaving a large dirt expanse in the far northeast corner of Cupertino.



Campus 2 was first unveiled by late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs in 2011, who is said to have played a major role in the planning and design of the new company headquarters.

The crown jewel of the build, a gigantic ring-shaped "spaceship" structure, will house some 12,000 employees, while ancillary facilities are to provide meeting and presentation space. Surrounding the main building will be roving footpaths, bike paths and indigenous foliage.

Construction of Apple's Campus 2 is expected to be completed by 2016.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,657member
    They couldn't salvage all that glass to be recycled?
  • Reply 2 of 26
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,331member
    I
    welshdog wrote: »
    They couldn't salvage all that glass to be recycled?

    I could be wrong but building glass is normally not recyclable because of what is in the glass (tinting, UV protection, lamination, tempering, etc. I could be wrong. Here's a URL to an article that backs up that assumption:
    http://1800recycling.com/2011/09/window-glass-recycling-difficult-not-impossible/
  • Reply 3 of 26
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jkichline View Post



    I

    I could be wrong but building glass is normally not recyclable because of what is in the glass (tinting, UV protection, lamination, tempering, etc. I could be wrong. Here's a URL to an article that backs up that assumption:

    http://1800recycling.com/2011/09/window-glass-recycling-difficult-not-impossible/

     

    Yeah, pretty sure you're right about that.

     

    Anyways, that video was suhweeeet.  For some reason, I always find building demolitions very cool, whether they are like this one with a teardown, or implosions.  I can watch that stuff all day! :)

     

    Oh, PS: The link to the March 16 story with the pics has an "%22" at the end which makes it lead to a 404 error.

  • Reply 4 of 26
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Is that another official Apple YouTube channel?
  • Reply 5 of 26
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    welshdog wrote: »
    They couldn't salvage all that glass to be recycled?

    Don't know about the glass specifically, but they do make use of all material according to the project plan:

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/apple-campus2-project/Project_Description_Submittal7.pdf
    The sloping site will be re-graded to provide a level ground floor for the Main Building...Apple will expand its current waste management program, which achieves a diversion rate of 78%. During construction of Apple Campus 2, the goal is to divert construction and demolition waste from landfills by finding multiple alternative uses, such as recycling, reuse on site or on other sites.
    Key elements of the waste management program during operations are the increase of material reuse, recycling from solid waste sources and composting.


    solipsismx wrote: »
    Is that another official Apple YouTube channel?

    Hard to say with just one post, but I don't think Apple will ever lower themselves to have 'their own YouTube channel'. It's a place filled with ill-....ah, Wiki tells it so much better than me:
    User comments
    See also: Criticism of Google#YouTube user comments
    Most videos enable users to leave comments, and these have attracted attention for the negative aspects of both their form and content. In 2006, Time praised Web 2.0 for enabling "community and collaboration on a scale never seen before", and added that YouTube "harnesses the stupidity of crowds as well as its wisdom. Some of the comments on YouTube make you weep for the future of humanity just for the spelling alone, never mind the obscenity and the naked hatred". The Guardian in 2009 described users' comments on YouTube as:
    “ Juvenile, aggressive, misspelled, sexist, homophobic, swinging from raging at the contents of a video to providing a pointlessly detailed description followed by a LOL, YouTube comments are a hotbed of infantile debate and unashamed ignorance – with the occasional burst of wit shining through.
  • Reply 6 of 26
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,752member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    Don't know about the glass specifically, but they do make use of all material according to the project plan:



    https://s3.amazonaws.com/apple-campus2-project/Project_Description_Submittal7.pdf



    Hard to say with just one post, but I don't think Apple will ever lower themselves to have 'their own YouTube channel'. It's a place filled with ill-....ah, Wiki tells it so much better than me:

    So, you might say that you've never seen a more wretched hive of scum and villany? 

  • Reply 7 of 26
    mac95mac95 Posts: 26member
    After seeing that, why use tanks for anything... on the other hand, why not use tanks to demolish buildings... whatever.
  • Reply 8 of 26
    darklitedarklite Posts: 229member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    Hard to say with just one post, but I don't think Apple will ever lower themselves to have 'their own YouTube channel'. It's a place filled with ill-....ah, Wiki tells it so much better than me:

    They could just turn comments off, though. It'd be a good avenue for them to disseminate news in video form.

  • Reply 9 of 26
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Hard to say with just one post, but I don't think Apple will ever lower themselves to have 'their own YouTube channel'. It's a place filled with ill-....ah, Wiki tells it so much better than me:

    I believe this is directly run by Apple.
  • Reply 10 of 26
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I believe this is directly run by Apple.

    Could be. Or a fan with too much time on his hands.

    You're up early; going swimming?
  • Reply 11 of 26
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Could be. Or a fan with too much time on his hands.

    You're up early; going swimming?

    1) I think the Apple channel is legit but Apple Internal isn't because of their use of the exclamation point in the About section and smily face emotion in the comments section.

    2) Just up early. Debating going back to bed. I have zero interest in exercising this morning. Did you run today?
  • Reply 12 of 26
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    solipsismx wrote: »

    1) I think the Apple channel is legit but Apple Internal isn't because of their use of the exclamation point in the About section and smily face emotion in the comments section.

    Good point. Still, I cannot comprehend why they would want their 'own YouTube channel'. They use their homepage for stuff like this. And anything that's old is, well, old, and they don't look back.
    2) Just up early. Debating going back to bed. I have zero interest in exercising this morning. Did you run today?

    Nope, sitting in from of the big screen reading last weeks articles and post on AI. Doesn't look I missed anything, except for some really great humour that's still going on, fortunately.

    Right, enough of this typing - I'm off running! (thanks Sol)
  • Reply 13 of 26
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,355member
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post



    They couldn't salvage all that glass to be recycled?

    jkichline & PhilBoogie are on the right track.

     

    The additives to glass carry on throughout the recycling process, including coloring. If you recycle a bunch of green glass bottles with clear ones, the recycled glass will end up with a slight green tinge. Note that introducing some types of glass (borosilicate or "Pyrex") is actually quite harmful to the mixture.

     

    The main issue is the commercial viability of window glass recycling. It's not like a building's windows are being recycled once a month; these demolished buildings were probably 30-40 years old.

     

    Consumer glass container recycling makes sense since it is really low hanging fruit. The high volume of recyclable material and the effort in separating various food-grade glass containers is relatively straightforward.

     

    Based on the link PhilBoogie offered, much of the demolished buildings' materials will be repurposed on site, probably in the form of aggregate (concrete, asphalt, glass, maybe gypsum wallboard).

     

    The metal (like steel rebar) is recyclable but would likely go to a nearby industrial metal recycling center. There's one in nearby Redwood City.

  • Reply 14 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    Is that another official Apple YouTube channel?

    humm....is this what your looking for?

    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXP8qPO6nv6QOD5zHNuQ1OQ

  • Reply 15 of 26
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    pte apple wrote: »
    humm....is this what your looking for?
    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXP8qPO6nv6QOD5zHNuQ1OQ

    Unffortunately that one is auto-created by YouTube.
  • Reply 16 of 26
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,509member
    Someone could use this footage to pretend that Apple has gone bankrupt and their own buildings are being demolished.
  • Reply 17 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,719member
    jkichline wrote: »
    I
    I could be wrong but building glass is normally not recyclable because of what is in the glass (tinting, UV protection, lamination, tempering, etc. I could be wrong. Here's a URL to an article that backs up that assumption:
    http://1800recycling.com/2011/09/window-glass-recycling-difficult-not-impossible/

    I think it is more a matter of what glass is made of. Sand isn't exactly a rare element. Many communities don't even try to recycle glass. The various materials mixed in don't help the process either as you note.

    Beyond that anything highly recyclable in the building will be recycled, you can be sure of that. Especially copper wire, steel and the like.
  • Reply 18 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,719member
    mpantone wrote: »
    jkichline & PhilBoogie are on the right track.

    The additives to glass carry on throughout the recycling process, including coloring. If you recycle a bunch of green glass bottles with clear ones, the recycled glass will end up with a slight green tinge. Note that introducing some types of glass (borosilicate or "Pyrex") is actually quite harmful to the mixture.
    This is very true, but even so the raw materials in glass are so cheap that the incentive simply isn't there.
    The main issue is the commercial viability of window glass recycling. It's not like a building's windows are being recycled once a month; these demolished buildings were probably 30-40 years old.

    Consumer glass container recycling makes sense since it is really low hanging fruit. The high volume of recyclable material and the effort in separating various food-grade glass containers is relatively straightforward.
    I think you will be surprised where much of that consumer glass ends up.
    Based on the link PhilBoogie offered, much of the demolished buildings' materials will be repurposed on site, probably in the form of aggregate (concrete, asphalt, glass, maybe gypsum wallboard).
    The big ugly here is the hazardous materials that might have been missed.
    The metal (like steel rebar) is recyclable but would likely go to a nearby industrial metal recycling center. There's one in nearby Redwood City.

    The problem with rebar is that it is embedded in concrete. Concrete waste Is often used for land fill, landscaping and the like because it is basically a rock.
  • Reply 19 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,719member
    One thing about this video, it has to be fun to be operating one of those machines tearing down these buildings. ????????.

    On the other hand those buildings are coming down awfully easy for being in an earthquake zone.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,355member

    I'm sure there will need to be some triage in terms of removing hazardous materials, but this is not the first time in this area that an old building has been torn down to make way for new construction.

     

    As for rebar, there's probably not a lot of it anyhow. The concrete will probably be crushed to make aggregate, some of the rebar would be recovered at this point. Anything that is still embedded in the concrete will probably end up as rocks with bits of metal.

     

    As to glass recycling, I know that SF Bay Area communities encourage glass container recycling. It's also part of the statewide California Redemption Value (5 cents per container less than 24 oz.) that consumers pay at the checkout stand. Anyone who lives in California is familiar with the early morning sound of people scavenging through recycling bins.

     

    The statewide redemption rate is 94%. Of the items turned in for recycling, the recycling rate is a little over 75%. Sure, a green glass wine bottle may not exist again as a green glass wine bottle, but there's actually a pretty good chance of it here in California.

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