Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 8, OS X 10.10 remains steady ahead of WWDC 2014

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 2014
Testing of Apple's anticipated next-generation operating systems -- iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 -- continues along at a steady clip, new traffic data shows, ahead of the upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference, where both products are expected to be unveiled.




AppleInsider has been tracking traffic it sees from the next major versions of iOS and OS X, keeping an eye on trends as WWDC approaches its June 2 kickoff. While traffic from both Apple's mobile and desktop-class operating systems was steadily growing through late 2013, it's largely flattened out over the last month, traffic logs show.

In a somewhat interesting pattern, traffic from devices running iOS 8 was largely steady regardless of the day of the week, with only small drop-offs on weekends. Macs running OS X 10.10, however, saw a significant decline in visits on weekends, reflecting the fact that those machines are probably used mostly at work.

Traffic from Macs running OS X 10.10 was also higher than iOS 8 on peak days.




The data suggests that Apple is hard at work testing out the next-generation versions of its iOS and OS X platforms, both of which are expected to be announced at an anticipated June 2 WWDC keynote. Apple took the same stage in San Francisco last year to officially unveil iOS 7 and OS X 10.9 Mavericks to its developer community and the public at large.

In its WWDC 2014 announcement, Apple did reveal that the company plans to show off its "latest advances in iOS and OS X," stopping short of admitting that full-fledged point-zero releases will be shown off.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    Always fun to see what is next.
  • Reply 2 of 64
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,167member
    @ tookieman2013

    I agree, we should tell all the Windows XP users that! :D
  • Reply 3 of 64
    macapfelmacapfel Posts: 503member
    Mavericks was quite an incremental update, except you count the addition of two apps (maps & iBooks) as real OS extensions. Some further OS expansion would in my opinion be tighter cloud integration. Another possibility is a more extensive UI overhaul and more similarities to iOS. I personally find it confusing that Contacts, Mail, Safari, etc. icons are different on OS X and iOS.
  • Reply 4 of 64
    froodfrood Posts: 771member

    Hopefully they'll have some sort of variation or improvement on widgets or continuously letting apps run on a portion of the screen in iOS8.  Assuming they are releasing a bigger screen phone they need to take advantage of what you can actually do with more screen real estate.  Simply being able to cram 50 icons on the screen instead of 20 would just make for clutter.

  • Reply 5 of 64
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,756member
    [QUOTE] In a somewhat interesting pattern, traffic from devices running iOS 8 was largely steady regardless of the day of the week, with only small drop-offs on weekends. Macs running OS X 10.10, however, saw a significant decline in visits on weekends, reflecting the fact that those machines are probably used mostly at work. [/QUOTE]

    Or one could say that the Mac OS guys have their OS fairly well debugged and the iOS guys are on a crash program to get the bugs out. I find it highly unlikely that they have that many iOS devices out in the wild right now.
  • Reply 6 of 64
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    macapfel wrote: »
    Mavericks was quite an incremental update, except you count the addition of two apps (maps & iBooks) as real OS extensions. Some further OS expansion would in my opinion be tighter cloud integration. Another possibility is a more extensive UI overhaul and more similarities to iOS. I personally find it confusing that Contacts, Mail, Safari, etc. icons are different on OS X and iOS.
    Well if 9to5Mac is correct, the big feature of OSX this year will be the UI redesign. I don't expect OSX to look exactly like iOS but I won't be surprised to see icons looking more like their iOS counterparts and any last vestiges of faux leather, felt, etc. removed. Peter Cohen made a good observation on the last iMore podcast. He works for an Apple reseller and said a lot of people that are new to the Mac are coming from iOS, so making elements of the UI more similar just makes sense.
  • Reply 7 of 64
    macapfelmacapfel Posts: 503member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Well if 9to5Mac is correct, the big feature of OSX this year will be the UI redesign. I don't expect OSX to look exactly like iOS but I won't be surprised to see icons looking more like their iOS counterparts and any last vestiges of faux leather, felt, etc. removed. Peter Cohen made a good observation on the last iMore podcast. He works for an Apple reseller and said a lot of people that are new to the Mac are coming from iOS, so making elements of the UI more similar just makes sense.

    I also don't expect OS X to look like iOS. Although, in principal it is almost possible with Launchpad and full screen apps. At the moment it would feel forced to unify OS X and iOS. If there is a point in the future, when a separation of OS X and iOS feels forced, a unification will come. But this day still appears quite far away.

  • Reply 8 of 64
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,756member
    macapfel wrote: »
    Mavericks was quite an incremental update,
    What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?

    except you count the addition of two apps (maps & iBooks) as real OS extensions.
    Apps are not the operating system. The operating system was enhanced significantly, spend sometime with the developer tools and actually develop an understanding of what has happened with Mac OS over the years.
    Some further OS expansion would in my opinion be tighter cloud integration.
    For the most part the could is a joke and anti user. I don't see excessive could integration as being a big help for most users. ICloud especially gets far to many things wrong, as such I don't see it ever being a huge success unless Apple can significantly overhaul the facility to make it more useful. In a more general sense there might be a few could based features worth adding but Mac OS needs a different approach than what is seen in some of the iOS solutions. The perfect example here is Siri which could be useful on the Mac if the IA was actually running on the Mac so that traffic to the web is minimized. However such a Mac Siri would not be seen as a could services so much as a Mac service that can intelligently talk to the cloud.
    Another possibility is a more extensive UI overhaul and more similarities to iOS. I personally find it confusing that Contacts, Mail, Safari, etc. icons are different on OS X and iOS.

    I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.
  • Reply 9 of 64
    "The data suggest"
  • Reply 10 of 64
    macapfelmacapfel Posts: 503member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post





    What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?



    I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.

     

    You might be right from a developer perspective. So no argument here. I was talking from a user perspective. There I can't see a big difference to 10.8. It's not a complaint, more an observation. As such more UI consistency between iOS and OS X is desirable, e.g. icons.

  • Reply 11 of 64
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,756member
    frood wrote: »
    Hopefully they'll have some sort of variation or improvement on widgets or continuously letting apps run on a portion of the screen in iOS8.  
    I don't think Widgets are needed. I'd rather see something like picture in picture, where I could bounce between two apps relatively efficiently and at the very least get a summary display in the shrunken app. However you have a real problem with screen real estate and frankly I prefer the current app switching most of the time. Even on my iPad there really isn't enough room to have two apps on screen. This especially when the keyboard pops up.
    Assuming they are releasing a bigger screen phone they need to take advantage of what you can actually do with more screen real estate.  Simply being able to cram 50 icons on the screen instead of 20 would just make for clutter.
    I think that is a matter of opinion. One thing that I'd like to see though is an always there search bar. I'd also want to see a more substantial status bar or at least give us the option. For the status bar I'm primarily interested in larger text for the clock and more display options for that clock. I wouldn't be surprised to see more icons but I think Apple can make better use of the display, probably in ways we haven't thought about yet.
  • Reply 12 of 64
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    I don't mind if OS X gets a flat look, the original Mac OS was flat. It's the transparency I don't like, they think it puts content first, but it just makes things hard to read and cluttered looking.

  • Reply 13 of 64
    macapfelmacapfel Posts: 503member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ascii View Post

     

    I don't mind if OS X gets a flat look, the original Mac OS was flat. It's the transparency I don't like, they think it puts content first, but it just makes things hard to read and cluttered looking.


    I couldn't agree more: transparency, especially on iOS, is nothing but a distraction. Windows had transparency in Vista and I thought that was one of the worst UI decisions.

  • Reply 14 of 64
    tastowetastowe Posts: 108member
    @ tookieman2013

    I agree, we should tell all the Windows XP users that! :D
    The windows XP are outdated idiot dude.
  • Reply 15 of 64
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,375member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



    Or one could say that the Mac OS guys have their OS fairly well debugged and the iOS guys are on a crash program to get the bugs out. I find it highly unlikely that they have that many iOS devices out in the wild right now.

    With less than a month and a half until WWDC, it is rather likely that there are many devices running iOS 8 in the wild. Naturally, most (if not all) of the devices would be existing hardware (iPhone 5s, iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, iPad Air, iPad mini Retina, etc.) right now rather than beta hardware since we're presumably still about five months away from a new handset release.

     

    A casual passerby would not be able to tell that the Apple employee was running beta software on their device. If the Apple employee went to his/her kid's soccer game and shot some video with an iPhone or took a picture of their cappuccino, how would someone be able to tell?

     

    Do you look over people's shoulders to see what OS their phone is running? I don't. The only time I can tell is if I'm standing next to someone at a bar or on public transit.

  • Reply 16 of 64
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post





    What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?

    Apps are not the operating system. The operating system was enhanced significantly, spend sometime with the developer tools and actually develop an understanding of what has happened with Mac OS over the years.

    For the most part the could is a joke and anti user. I don't see excessive could integration as being a big help for most users. ICloud especially gets far to many things wrong, as such I don't see it ever being a huge success unless Apple can significantly overhaul the facility to make it more useful. In a more general sense there might be a few could based features worth adding but Mac OS needs a different approach than what is seen in some of the iOS solutions. The perfect example here is Siri which could be useful on the Mac if the IA was actually running on the Mac so that traffic to the web is minimized. However such a Mac Siri would not be seen as a could services so much as a Mac service that can intelligently talk to the cloud.

    I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.

     

    I agree with the first 1/2 of what you said. People forget about compressed memory, App Nap, coallesced timers,  adding a whole new mode of working with multiple monitors, tags, etc. 

     

    iCloud already is a huge success. Bookmark and keychain sharing between Macs and iOS devices is awesome. The same is true for document sharing between devices. Granted, core data syncing was rough when first released, but it has improved dramatically since then. Apple still has some work left ahead of them. Their current implementation of file management iOS-style feels incomplete. In addition, they don't have a good handle on generic file types such as images. I don't think iCloud syncing is going anywhere anytime soon.

  • Reply 17 of 64
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    macapfel wrote: »
    You might be right from a developer perspective. So no argument here. I was talking from a user perspective. There I can't see a big difference to 10.8. It's not a complaint, more an observation. As such more UI consistency between iOS and OS X is desirable, e.g. icons.

    Remember these are yearly and now free updates. Getting changes isn't like changes in Windows where they take a couple years to do a point update.

    They might be doing a tick/tock method where one year they concentrate more on the sub-system and the next on the UI. That gives each a couple years to be ironed out before the next set of big changes.
  • Reply 18 of 64
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,756member
    macapfel wrote: »
    You might be right from a developer perspective. So no argument here.
    I really like Mavericks so maybe I come off as a promoter but it go a lot of things right and has allowed me to keep an old MBP running another year.
    I was talking from a user perspective. There I can't see a big difference to 10.8. It's not a complaint, more an observation.
    I think that is the whole point you aren't suppose to see a big difference. Significant parts of the operating system where upgraded or improved yet there was little app breakage, performance improved and so did stability.

    Apps are a different story and a few new ones came with Mavericks, but Apps aren't really the operating system. Sure Apple ships Safari, Mail and a bunch of others but you aren't stuck with them and their particular gloss.

    More importantly to me, I'd rather see Apple keep thing consistent across operating system releases rather than to suffer through a botched attempt to improve things like Windows 8 tried to do.
    As such more UI consistency between iOS and OS X is desirable, e.g. icons.
    I don't consider iCons to be part of the OS either, they are part of the app as such Apple can do whatever it wants with app icons anytime it chooses. However they need to be careful here because I've had installed user apps upgrade their app icon during a modest don't release and frankly it sucks if the change is dramatic. The problem is once you get use to an icon it becomes muscle memory when accessing it. If I have to retrain myself to use common features of Mac OS then I have to ask is it worth it. Especially when some of Apples icons are damn near classics.

    Some designs are classics, take for example the Hobart/Kitchen Aid mixers that have had the same basic mechanical design for years. Sometimes it just makes more sense to keep a familiar and reliable design around instead of screwing with it. This is how I feel about much of the Mac OS interface, nothing substantially better has come around so why screw with it. Sure tweak it here and there but let's not screw it up like MS did with Windows. The time to drop familiarity is when there is a substantial advancement to be had, I see this happening when Mac OS can be extended with AI technology.
  • Reply 19 of 64
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,756member
    I agree with the first 1/2 of what you said. People forget about compressed memory, App Nap, coallesced timers,  adding a whole new mode of working with multiple monitors, tags, etc. 
    Yes a very significant update of what an OS is all about. The surprising thing to me is that they pulled all this off with little breakage.
    iCloud already is a huge success. Bookmark and keychain sharing between Macs and iOS devices is awesome. The same is true for document sharing between devices.
    Book marks and Keychain works well but I really have a significant hate for the way document sharing or handling works with iCloud. In fact considering Apples uniquely skilled engineers I have to wonder how they managed to screw up documents so much, especially on the iOS side of things.
    Granted, core data syncing was rough when first released, but it has improved dramatically since then. Apple still has some work left ahead of them. Their current implementation of file management iOS-style feels incomplete.
    In my mind it is completely broken. There is no file browser app, no common store for sharing data across apps, no standard file navigator for apps to call upon and I have no idea which files are significant storage users. It is in effect so incomplete that at times I just avoid using iOS apps. Hell I can't even save an MP3 file from Safari.
    In addition, they don't have a good handle on generic file types such as images.
    Exactly! It truly sucks the way iOS works with what are common file types. Some things really boggle the mind, like the inability to save a spreadsheet from Safari.
    I don't think iCloud syncing is going anywhere anytime soon.

    No it won't because that is about the only thing that works well in IOS and Mac OS. Beyond syncing though iOS is extremely frustrating to work with.
  • Reply 20 of 64
    bdkennedy1bdkennedy1 Posts: 1,459member

    I hope that 3D dock will be GONE.

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