Alleged 'iPhone 6' logic board claimed to include 802.11ac Wi-Fi, NFC chip

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 2014
A series of new photos out of China claims to show the logic board for Apple's anticipated "iPhone 6," with information accompanying the pictures alleging that the board includes support for ultra-fast 802.11ac Wi-Fi, as well as near-field communications for potential e-wallet functions.


Photos via Nowhereelse.fr.


The alleged "iPhone 6" logic board was shown on Saturday by French site Nowhereelse.fr, which said the source from China who sent the pictures is "particularly reliable." That person claimed that the "iPhone 6" motherboard will feature an NFC chip, as well as a wireless 802.11ac Wi-Fi module, both of which would be firsts for wireless connectivity in Apple's iPhone lineup.

The person also claimed that the reference number for the next iPhone is "N61." The mounting brackets on the pictured board also seem to match up with leaked parts claiming to be from a 4.7-inch "iPhone 6."

The part shown in the picture lacks any included chips, and is just the logic board itself. That means key components, like an anticipated "A8" processor, flash storage, and even the rumored Wi-Fi chip are not actually pictured.

The inclusion of 802.11ac Wi-Fi would bring the next iPhone up to speed with Apple's current Mac lineup, most of which support the next-generation wireless connectivity. Apple began offering support for 802.11ac in June of 2013 when it launched compatible MacBook Air models and a redesigned AirPort Extreme.




As for near-field communications, Apple has been rumored to adopt NFC support for e-wallet functions for years, but until now the company has instead relied on a combination of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi for short-range functions like iBeacons and AirDrop. This claim is more suspect than 802.11ac Wi-Fi, because of Apple's lack of interest in NFC thus far.

The alleged parts leak joins pictures of flex cables claimed to be for a 5.5-inch version of the "iPhone 6" which leaked online Thursday. Those parts featured control for volume and wake/sleep control, and were also accompanied by a series of SIM trays.

And last week, photos of a "leaked" flex cable containing a Lightning connector, microphone and headphone jack also surfaced online. The overall design of that flex cable was largely similar to that of Apple's most recent iPhones, but had a few key differences including additional grounding plates and circuitry, and an unusually large headphone jack.

Apple's next-generation iPhone is expected to be announced at a media event in September. The company is widely believed to be planning a major redesign of its best-selling handset, and is rumored to offer the device in screen sizes of 4.7 inches and 5.5 inches.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 130
    Is it from the 5.5 inch? Because, that would make better headlines.
  • Reply 2 of 130
    Ah, I was hoping that iPhone 5s users would be able to use their phones for mobile payments. I guess that's not going to happen now :\
  • Reply 3 of 130
    Totally missing from the article is any mention of the RDF, otherwise known as the Jobsian field) chip.
  • Reply 4 of 130
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,517member
    acatomic wrote: »
    Ah, I was hoping that iPhone 5s users would be able to use their phones for mobile payments. I guess that's not going to happen now :\
    Not necessarily. Apple may offer multi-modal mobile payment options as a part of iOS 8. OS could default to whatever means of NFC the device supports.
  • Reply 5 of 130
    gigatelgigatel Posts: 12member

    Except Apple isn't going to use NFC at all. The focus is clearly on LE Bluetooth.

  • Reply 6 of 130

    Yep, Apple leading the way....again! :)

     

    Best.

  • Reply 7 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    gigatel wrote: »
    Except Apple isn't going to use NFC at all. The focus is clearly on LE Bluetooth.

    Then why all the NFC patents? Why spend R&D dollars on a technology that they're not going to use at all?
  • Reply 8 of 130
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,771member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gigatel View Post

     

    Except Apple isn't going to use NFC at all. The focus is clearly on LE Bluetooth.


     

    All the buzz so far would suggest you're right, but making the iP6 unique in its ability to support a NFC payment system would sure be a good way to drive sales of the new device.

  • Reply 9 of 130
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Then why all the NFC patents? Why spend R&D dollars on a technology that they're not going to use at all?

     

    Companies patent things invented through R&D all the time. Not everything they work on in the lab gets into an actual device, but they still patent it. If you invented it, and spent money inventing it, then you need some protection even if you don't use it.

  • Reply 10 of 130
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,771member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    Then why all the NFC patents? Why spend R&D dollars on a technology that they're not going to use at all?

     

    Possible reasons:

     

    1. Defensive posturing. Prevent others from using methods that Apple has identified as being good.

     

    2. Due diligence of the technical variety. You can't really be sure which approach is best without trying them all. Maybe Apple researched the hell out of NFC and the result was that they think Bluetooth is a better bet.

  • Reply 11 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    Possible reasons:

    1. Defensive posturing. Prevent others from using methods that Apple has identified as being good.

    2. Due diligence of the technical variety. You can't really be sure which approach is best without trying them all. Maybe Apple researched the hell out of NFC and the result was that they think Bluetooth is a better bet.

    Or

    3. They do plan to use it.
  • Reply 12 of 130
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

    Then why all the NFC patents? Why spend R&D dollars on a technology that they're not going to use at all?



    Same reason they did it for the dozens of other features they never used.

  • Reply 13 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    Companies patent things invented through R&D all the time. Not everything they work on in the lab gets into an actual device, but they still patent it. If you invented it, and spent money inventing it, then you need some protection even if you don't use it.

    I can understand patenting it for licensing reasons, but protecting it so that no one else can use it is greedy, and the epitome of being a patent troll.
  • Reply 13 of 130
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member

    Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

     

    All the buzz so far would suggest you're right, but making the iP6 unique in its ability to support a NFC payment system would sure be a good way to drive sales of the new device.


     

    Any touchless payment system could be considered a killer feature if it were only available on iPhone "6" and later.

    Touch ID was a killer feature for the 5S last year.  Always has been painful tapping in those bizarre passwords I use.

    And it certainly seems like I need to type them more frequently lately.

     

    But Touch ID's real benefit is improved security, even for those who never used a passcode before.

    Likewise, a touchless mobile payment system in the "6" could be a convenience + security must-have.

    And both could use the (presumed) A8's Secure Enclave.

  • Reply 15 of 130
    In my opinion NFC is a necessity. It may not be so in the US but in Europe NFC is so common now that Apple cannot leave it out
  • Reply 16 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member

    Same reason they did it for the dozens of other features they never used.

    Faulty logic postulated on imperfect data collection. Everyone is just guessing, and passing it along as fact.
  • Reply 17 of 130
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    I can understand patenting it for licensing reasons, but protecting it so that no one else can use it is greedy, and the epitome of being a patent troll.

    Bull. You spend money inventing something you have every right to patent it and charge others to use it (or prevent others from using it).

    You don't have a clue what a patent troll is if you think it's the "epitome" of being a troll. Here's a hint: owning a patent and not using it doesn't make you a troll. Collecting money from patents you own (but don't use) does not make you a troll either. Even patent assertions entities that make nothing but license patents aren't trolls.

    The proposed changes to the patent system to deal with trolls make no mention of the above. They talk about things like threatening companies, being vague about what devices infringe (or exactly how they infringe) or filing frivolous lawsuits to scare companies to settle. These are the actions of a troll.
  • Reply 18 of 130
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,252member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

     

    But Touch ID's real benefit is improved security, even for those who never used a passcode before.


    I think that the current passcode override of TouchID somewhat defeats the purpose. I wonder if there could be a method that bypasses passcodes altogether.

  • Reply 19 of 130
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

     

    I think that the current passcode override of TouchID somewhat defeats the purpose. I wonder if there could be a method that bypasses passcodes altogether.


     

    Yes, it's possible that people could use 0000 or other easily-remembered passcodes out of ignorance and/or laziness.

    But for some reason the iPhone 5S requires you to tap in your passcode on reboots.  Not sure why.

    You'd think that the hardware could compare your thumbprint hash against that in the Secure Enclave as usual.

  • Reply 20 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    Bull. You spend money inventing something you have every right to patent it and charge others to use it (or prevent others from using it).

    You don't have a clue what a patent troll is if you think it's the "epitome" of being a troll. Here's a hint: owning a patent and not using it doesn't make you a troll. Collecting money from patents you own (but don't use) does not make you a troll either. Even patent assertions entities that make nothing but license patents aren't trolls.

    The proposed changes to the patent system to deal with trolls make no mention of the above. They talk about things like threatening companies, being vague about what devices infringe (or exactly how they infringe) or filing frivolous lawsuits to scare companies to settle. These are the actions of a troll.

    Here's the definition I found.
    Enforces patents against purported infringers without itself intending to manufacture the patented product or supply the patented service.
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