Apple Stores begin on-site iPhone 5s screen replacements

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 2014
As of Monday, Apple Stores are conducting on-site iPhone 5s screen replacements, allowing customers to have their damaged displays assessed and repaired in as little as one hour.

MachineThe machine used by Apple's Geniuses to precisely align replacement displays.


According to multiple reports, users with damaged iPhone 5s screens were able to visit an Apple Store and -- in most cases -- have the broken component swapped out for a new part within an hour. Previously, customers had to ship their 5s to Apple for servicing and replacement, a process that could take up to five days

AppleInsider was able to verify that the new service is indeed rolling out to Apple Stores across the U.S., though one representative noted availability is not yet guaranteed at all locations.

The iPhone 5s screen replacement program is identical to Apple's existing on-site display repair options in that customers need to bring the handset in for evaluation before being furnished with turnover time and price estimates. Depending on how the screen was broken, and whether the hardware is protected by AppleCare+, owners are likely to pay $149 per repair, which is much less than the $269 fee quoted for off-site replacements. Accidental breakage is not covered under Apple's free limited one-year warranty.

Once in the hands of Apple Store technicians, the phone is examined for water damage and other hardware failures that may necessitate comprehensive off-site repair or replacement. For its in-store process, Apple is thought to be using the same machine that handles iPhone 5 and 5c screen repairs to precisely align and install new iPhone 5s displays.

Apple most recently extended on-site iPhone screen repairs to the mid-tier iPhone 5c in January.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 669member

    Replace the glass on your iPhone for only 15 hours* worth of minimum wage labor! 

     

    *your state's results may vary. 

  • Reply 2 of 26
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,447member
    tyler82 wrote: »
    Replace the glass on your iPhone for only 15 hours* worth of minimum wage labor! 

    *your state's results may vary. 

    Before taxes. Don't seem right.
  • Reply 3 of 26
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 669member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post





    Before taxes. Don't seem right.

    Deduct 20% more for transportation to and from said job and paying for your own uniform. 

  • Reply 4 of 26
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    tyler82 wrote: »
    Replace the glass on your iPhone for only 15 hours* worth of minimum wage labor! 

    *your state's results may vary. 

    19 hours or half a weeks work in Arizona.
  • Reply 5 of 26
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    150 is more in line to what the shops around here charge to do it. Still expensive though, wouldn't it more advantages for Apple to fix the design problem. Perhaps use rubber corners, an all metal housing is attractive but reeks havoc on the glass, front and back when dropped.
  • Reply 6 of 26

    Those machines are used for calibration, not to put the displays on or align them, that is all done by the technician by hand. 5s's are unique cause the touch ID sensor only works properly with the phone it shipped with, meaning the machine calibrates new touch ID to the device as well.

  • Reply 7 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post



    150 is more in line to what the shops around here charge to do it. Still expensive though, wouldn't it more advantages for Apple to fix the design problem. Perhaps use rubber corners, an all metal housing is attractive but reeks havoc on the glass, front and back when dropped.

    design problem? Here we go again. Why don't you again tell us how all windows and android phones are all designed and work so much better than iPhones. otherwise stfu

  • Reply 8 of 26
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,320member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ApplePieGuy View Post

     

    design problem? Here we go again. Why don't you again tell us how all windows and android phones are all designed and work so much better than iPhones. otherwise stfu


    Huh?  In terms of hardware durability there are a number of phones that are competitive with and even exceed the iPhone.  A plastic body that flexes and rebounds will be kinder to the screen than the metal iPhone if dropped on a corner.

  • Reply 9 of 26
    aderutteraderutter Posts: 224member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post



    wouldn't it more advantages for Apple to fix the design problem. Perhaps use rubber corners, an all metal housing is attractive but reeks havoc on the glass, front and back when dropped.

     

    I'd rather Apple continue to design good looking products primarily for users who take care of their products.

     

    Me and my extended family have had iPhones for quite a few years now and have never had a problem with any of them! Even the 3g and 3gs are still in daily use with no problems, no cracked glass or anything.

     

    There is no design problem.

    There are idiotic people out there though and they own devices made by all kinds of manufacturers and don't look after them. The difference is Apple devices are quality items worthy of being repaired if an accident happens. A friend of mine sat on and broke his big-assed Samsung phone, but he didn't get it fixed he just put it in the bin and bought a new (not Samsung) phone.

  • Reply 10 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Huh?  In terms of hardware durability there are a number of phones that are competitive with and even exceed the iPhone.  A plastic body that flexes and rebounds will be kinder to the screen than the metal iPhone if dropped on a corner.


     

    I've lost count of the number of Galaxy S4s I've spotted (at work) with cracks spidering out from the corners.

     

    If you have a better practical example, by all means cite it.

  • Reply 11 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Huh?  In terms of hardware durability there are a number of phones that are competitive with and even exceed the iPhone.  A plastic body that flexes and rebounds will be kinder to the screen than the metal iPhone if dropped on a corner.




    Actually, when the phone is dropped from shoulder height (quite high) on a corner, it heavily dents the phone but will not smash the screen.

     

    For the screen to smash, it has to have direct impact, and therefore land facing downwards.

     

    It is not a design fault, as aderutter mentioned, it is carelessness. I have had 5 iPhones over the years, two iPads and a Mac, and have never broke any of their screens.

     

    The same argument could apply to many products. Such as cars. I drive and scrape my car down the side of a wall, and when I caused the issue, is it the manufacturers fault that the paint came off, or the windows smashed?

     

    There is a point when the fault lies with the customer, by purchasing a device you are accepting responsibility for it's wellbeing, cosmetic damages outside the scope of manufacturers defects.

  • Reply 12 of 26
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,320member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MazeCookie View Post

     

    The same argument could apply to many products. Such as cars. I drive and scrape my car down the side of a wall, and when I caused the issue, is it the manufacturers fault that the paint came off, or the windows smashed?

     

    There is a point when the fault lies with the customer, by purchasing a device you are accepting responsibility for it's wellbeing, cosmetic damages outside the scope of manufacturers defects.


    I don't disagree with you if it's purely about cosmetics, but the functionality and utility of the iPhone (and Galaxy, Lumia, Nexus etc) is majorly impinged by the state of the screen.

     

    Yes people should be careful with their stuff, but we're talking about a mobile device, for use on the move, that is used frequently throughout the day - so lots of getting out of pockets, putting back into pockets - and one handed use, so not an especially stable environment.  Apple's adverts promote this kind of use case, so some amount of wear and tear and susceptibility to accident is to be expected as part of average, regular use.

     

    It should therefore be a necessary part of the product design to build in robustness and minimise points of weakness.  I think Apple accepts this, and does a good job here, their phones and their computers are all tough and take a lot of damage, and they give a pretty good service for accidental damages.  That doesn't mean they couldn't do more, and I think the biggest points of weakness remaining are the phone waterproofing (really wish Apple would do something about this, other manufacturers are ahead right now) and the vulnerability of the screen (sapphire will help a lot, but a pliable buffer between the screen and the rigid frame would also help).

     

    The car analogy doesn't really work, since car drivers can reasonably be expected to not drive their cars against walls and there are laws and tests and road markings and things in place to ensure that this doesn't happen.  Plus, if it just causes cosmetic damage, well that's the user's problem.  Only if it impacts on the key functionality should it be considered a consumer protection issue.

  • Reply 13 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MazeCookie View Post

     



    Actually, when the phone is dropped from shoulder height (quite high) on a corner, it heavily dents the phone but will not smash the screen.

     

    For the screen to smash, it has to have direct impact, and therefore land facing downwards.

     

    It is not a design fault, as aderutter mentioned, it is carelessness. I have had 5 iPhones over the years, two iPads and a Mac, and have never broke any of their screens.

     

    The same argument could apply to many products. Such as cars. I drive and scrape my car down the side of a wall, and when I caused the issue, is it the manufacturers fault that the paint came off, or the windows smashed?

     

    There is a point when the fault lies with the customer, by purchasing a device you are accepting responsibility for it's wellbeing, cosmetic damages outside the scope of manufacturers defects.


    Anecdotal evidence has very little statistical significance.  Do you have any citations to support these highly-specific claims (shoulder-height drops, etc.)?  Per your argument, the iPhone could be made of the most fragile substance in the world, and if it breaks, it's the users fault via carelessness.  I think it's more expected that someone will occasionally drop a phone than it is that they will occasionally ram their car into a wall.  While I believe the iPhone is overall well made, I also believe that the manufacturer has a responsibility to make a durable product.  

  • Reply 14 of 26
    hans01hans01 Posts: 12member
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

     

    Replace the glass on your iPhone for only 15 hours* worth of minimum wage labor! 

     

    *your state's results may vary. 




    So how many people on minimum wage do you think own the 5s?

  • Reply 15 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Brent McAnulty View Post

     

    Anecdotal evidence has very little statistical significance.  Do you have any citations to support these highly-specific claims (shoulder-height drops, etc.)?  Per your argument, the iPhone could be made of the most fragile substance in the world, and if it breaks, it's the users fault via carelessness.  I think it's more expected that someone will occasionally drop a phone than it is that they will occasionally ram their car into a wall.  While I believe the iPhone is overall well made, I also believe that the manufacturer has a responsibility to make a durable product.  




    I have no citations. They are very specific because of my own experience. I had worked in an Apple store for a very long time, and seen a huge amount of iPhone's with damaged displays. I have spoken to countless customers and their experience on how the phone was dropped.

     

    I have never seen an iPhone with a damaged display that has been dropped on it's corner from shoulder-height or lower. 

     

    And no, that is not per my argument. Please note, and I quote, "The same argument could apply to many products". Not every product, made out of any material.

    I also quote "There is a point when the fault lies with the customer". My argument clearly states that their is a subjective threshold where the customer needs to bear responsibility for it's fragility.

     

    I do not believe the iPhone is a poorly designed device. Nor do I believe most cars are poorly designed, yet they are still fragile. My argument is stating that the subjective threshold has been met, and an iPhone is durable enough to not shift blame to Apple.

  • Reply 16 of 26
    pdq2pdq2 Posts: 270member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Huh?  In terms of hardware durability there are a number of phones that are competitive with and even exceed the iPhone.  A plastic body that flexes and rebounds will be kinder to the screen than the metal iPhone if dropped on a corner.


     

    I'm not sure this is true. Glass doesn't "flex" very well, and if the surrounding body/frame flexes, I think you're more likely, not less, to crack the screen.

  • Reply 17 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brent McAnulty View Post

     

     While I believe the iPhone is overall well made, I also believe that the manufacturer has a responsibility to make a durable product.  



    ....and the consumer has the responsibility to not buy the product as it is offered, at the price and quality at which it is offered.

  • Reply 18 of 26
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,320member

    Sure, as long it is offered at or above the minimum acceptable offering, in line with reasonable consumer expectations.

     

    Consumers can't be expected to be omniscient about the quality of a product that they haven't bought.

  • Reply 19 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Sure, as long it is offered at or above the minimum acceptable offering, in line with reasonable consumer expectations.

     

    Consumers can't be expected to be omniscient about the quality of a product that they haven't bought.


    That makes absolutely no sense, given the general knowledge from consumer experience based on hundreds of millions that have been sold, the many hundreds of reviews on tech and consumer-reported websites, the numerous discussion boards (try searching for a phrase such as "iPhone screen break" and you'll get hundreds of millions of hits), and insurance that can be purchased to cover such a contingency.

     

    If a consumer can't be bothered to inform and protect himself/herself, it's his/her problem.

  • Reply 20 of 26
    There is no design flaw... there are people who treat their devices like they are worth the subsidized price they paid, and there are those like me who treat it as if it is worth $600-$700.
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