Gold 'Apple Watch Edition' could cost $1,200, industry insiders say

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  • Reply 141 of 163
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,778member
    iaeen wrote: »
    When you factor in servicing costs, a Rolex costs many times more than an Apple Watch, regardless of how much you are able to sell it for.

    Off Topic I guess but Rolex service costs are a bit OTT. $500 to look at it and clean, anything required to be done on top of that. It is a little excessive IMHO.
  • Reply 142 of 163
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    Really? We're comparing this Apple watch to a Rolex?
    Apple's venture into the jewelry business is beyond laughable. Who is going to jog wearing this- Nicki Minaj?
  • Reply 143 of 163
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post



    Really? We're comparing this Apple watch to a Rolex?

    Apple's venture into the jewelry business is beyond laughable. Who is going to jog wearing this- Nicki Minaj?

     

    Nicki Minaj would be the ideal person for the ?Watch. 

  • Reply 144 of 163
    Your proof of this is what?

    *sound of crickets*
    (As expected)
  • Reply 145 of 163
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    Your proof of this is what?


     

    Rolex would not have the drift in perceived functionality, because it is marketed  as a piece of jewelry. A gold Apple watch might count as a piece of jewelry, but it's also a tech item. After it is no longer supported, who would be interested in it? The gold version would be aimed at buyers who are not price sensitive, and I would expect them to buy the newest model. Buyers who are more cost constrained are probably better served by a newer model in a steel finish rather than a used one in gold. Apple has a vintage policy indicating the basic duration of hardware support. I don't see why they would deviate from it here. It's a different kind of product, but I think it will follow a similar cycle to the macs, meaning somewhere around a 3 year average repurchasing cycle.

  • Reply 146 of 163
    Your proof of this is what?

    Every other years old Apple device obviously.
  • Reply 147 of 163
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    Your proof of this is what?


     

    I think that this is probably fairly self-evident. That is, I'd be surprised if an Apple Watch retained its value like (say) a Rollex or other similar watch.

     

    The reason has nothing to do with brand, either. The reason is simple: Apple Watch runs applications, which no traditional watch does. It potentially needs OS updates. It is tied to another device (an iPhone), and that dependency naturally has a limited lifespan.

     

    So we're talking about moving from something purely mechanical (perhaps you need to add new batteries, or do some maintenance or whatever) to something entirely computerised with actual software. The shelf life is, by definition almost, not going to be anything like a "traditional" watch.

     

    In that context, questions of resale value become very different I would expect.

  • Reply 148 of 163
    marvfoxmarvfox Posts: 2,275member

    Rolex is an investment. Apple watches are a joke!

  • Reply 149 of 163
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

     

    Rolex is an investment. Apple watches are a joke!


     

    I don't think they are a joke...I just think they're different. Smart watches have never really existed before last year, in terms of being any kind of serious product category. So there are a lot of unknowns, I'd say.

  • Reply 150 of 163
    iaeeniaeen Posts: 588member
    marvfox wrote: »
    Rolex is an investment. Apple watches are a joke!

    The only joke here is that people actually think buying a consumer good is an investment. Don't get me wrong, I love automatic watches (not so much Rolex, though), but anyone who doesn't recognize that mechanical watches do depreciate and do incur servicing costs is delusional.

    Many automatic watches that cost nearly twice the starting price of the Apple Watch are considered disposable because servicing costs are nearly as much as the full retail price for a new one. That's admittantly not a Rolex problem, but that's more because Rolex retails for such a high amount rather than their being cheap to service.
  • Reply 151 of 163
    Being a day one Pebble owner I can say that a connected watch is a hugely useful device. I love custom displays powered with live data from the phone. I love having a media controller on my wrist as I sling podcasts to my Bluetooth headsets while outside.

    I love the polish of the Apple watch but need to use one first before judging its functionality for me.

    I will also say that although the iWatches are beautiful, no matter what, they will never be a Rolex class watch, Why? Because, by design they are simply not Timeless! You can't pass it down to your heirs, it's an electronic appliance, sealed in batteries etc. It will be great for two years at best, then tossed to the back of the drawer for a new model. Only the uber rich will be doing that with a gold iWatch.

    Without some form of refresh program, I would be inclined to get the cheapest model and toss it yearly like the appliance it is. I roll my ipads and iphones yearly and get top dollar trade-in on Amazon, this won't be happening with a worn iWatch as it would be hard to keep pristine.

    So Hat's off to Jony and his jeweler roots, whoever bought his gold earpods will love the gold iWatch to match...

    Give me a black, well made, plastic, iWatch and I'd be very happy as the aluminum one won't be pretty after a few months living out on a wrist.

    Regarding the Pebble, I have to say that the Pebble is waterproof, is always visible with the digital ink display, runs for days, and charges with a mag-safe type connection without the weight addition of inductive bits. For a tiny startup, these guys have given me one of the best experiences for my Kickstarter buck going on two years now. They have made the media player super easy and functional now, and I have to say that a few buttons on a watch are very useful to control things without looking, Play/Pause, Skip/Rewind, and Volume Up/Down have become my most loved features.

    The iWatch GUI looks stunning and I'm sure will be a joy to play with. Looking forward to where they can take this with all of their resources.
  • Reply 152 of 163
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    marvfox wrote: »
    Rolex is an investment. Apple watches are a joke!

    Some Rolex models are an investment, most of them, not so much. A Steve McQueen Daytona for example.
  • Reply 153 of 163
    marvfoxmarvfox Posts: 2,275member

    Now you are talking investment.The Daytona use to be a great watch years ago.

  • Reply 154 of 163

     



    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     


    Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

     

    Rolex keeps their value after years of use. Apple no!

     


     

    Your proof of this is what?


     

    We can look to the original iphone as an example.

    It originally sold for $600 then 2 months later dropped to $400 and then when the 3G came out it dropped even more. How much more, I don't remember.

     

    Today you can get one on ebay for a whopping $25!

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Original-Apple-iPhone-4GB-Black-Silver-Smartphone-A1203-/221548513571

     

    Or one with a cracked glass for $0.99

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/original-iphone-8gb-Apple-First-Generation-Smartphone-Ios/251644826017

     

    And that's for what Steve Jobs called a 'revolutionary and magical product'.

    https://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/01/09Apple-Reinvents-the-Phone-with-iPhone.html

     

    lol.

  • Reply 155 of 163
    marvfoxmarvfox Posts: 2,275member

    I had an old Rolex watch over 15 years and it sold for over $350.00 with scratches on the face of the watch to.

  • Reply 156 of 163
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Russell View Post

     

     

    We can look to the original iphone as an example.

    It originally sold for $600 then 2 months later dropped to $400 and then when the 3G came out it dropped even more. How much more, I don't remember.

     

    Today you can get one on ebay for a whopping $25!

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Original-Apple-iPhone-4GB-Black-Silver-Smartphone-A1203-/221548513571

     

    Or one with a cracked glass for $0.99

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/original-iphone-8gb-Apple-First-Generation-Smartphone-Ios/251644826017

     

    And that's for what Steve Jobs called a 'revolutionary and magical product'.

    https://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/01/09Apple-Reinvents-the-Phone-with-iPhone.html

     

    lol.


     

    http://www.computerworld.com/article/2496982/apple-mac/sold--antique-apple-1-brings-a-record--671k.html

     

    lol

     

    Although:-

     

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-11/rolex-daytona-sells-for-record-1-1-million-at-christie-s.html

     

    You would be extremely fortunate to come across either of these things.

  • Reply 157 of 163
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

     

     

     

    You would be extremely fortunate to come across either of these things.


     

    That computer would have depreciated heavily based on its value as a tool relative to current technology. It acquired value as a collector's item due to fascination, historical value, and increasing rarity. Twenty or thirty years from now an early serial number first generation iPhone in working condition may be worth a significant amount of money to collectors. That market won't be driven by people who want to use it as their day to day device. It's also not very important to people who wish to sell their first generation device to mitigate the cost of a second, third, or fourth generation replacement.

  • Reply 158 of 163
    iaeeniaeen Posts: 588member
    hmm wrote: »
    That computer would have depreciated heavily based on its value as a tool relative to current technology. It acquired value as a collector's item due to fascination, historical value, and increasing rarity. Twenty or thirty years from now an early serial number first generation iPhone in working condition may be worth a significant amount of money to collectors. That market won't be driven by people who want to use it as their day to day device. It's also not very important to people who wish to sell their first generation device to mitigate the cost of a second, third, or fourth generation replacement.

    Meanwhile, the automatic watch lost its value as a tool during the Quartz crisis. It's value today is nothing more than its value as a fashion piece or its collectable value. As price goes up it becomes less the former and more the latter.
  • Reply 159 of 163
    Quote:

     

    Over 6 million original iphones were manufactured on an assembly line. It hardly compares to a computer that was hand built and signed by Wozniak. Plus that particular one came with a signed letter from Jobs.

     

    Any one of us can "come across" (have an opportunity to purchase) either of these, in person or online. Does that make any of us extremely fortunate? 

  • Reply 160 of 163
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iaeen View Post





    Meanwhile, the automatic watch lost its value as a tool during the Quartz crisis. It's value today is nothing more than its value as a fashion piece or its collectable value. As price goes up it becomes less the former and more the latter.



    Watches are sold as jewelry today. I suspect Apple's version will be part-jewelry item, but they are known for technology and continuous product changes. If they become popular enough, they could make the "jewelry only" versions seem less desirable. In that regard we'll see what happens. It doesn't necessarily prop up the value of an Apple watch that is several generations old.

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