Consumer Reports test shows iPhone 6 Plus less 'bendy' than iPhone 6, suggests 'Bendgate' may be ove

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  • Reply 101 of 254
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member

    Both are still substantially weaker than an iPhone 5 /5s which is  still unacceptable.

    The 6S and 6PLUS S will be improved- mark me. This is not over yet.

  • Reply 102 of 254
    Hello everyone. I'd like to announce that the contest for winning an iPhone is now open at: http://winaniphone6.weebly.com
    Good luck!
  • Reply 103 of 254

    If your iPhone 6 Plus is bent for whatever reason, Apple will replace it. The iPhone 6 Plus does not bend, the Youtube guy used a hairdryer to heat up the phone before he bent it. Apple will replace it even if it only has a small bend. Suck on that Galaxy Note 3 users (that obviously includes myself).

  • Reply 104 of 254
    pazuzu wrote: »
    Isn't this rich- everyone at AI LOVES Consumer Reports now.

    You really should practice your reading comprehension.

    1. "This test by CR doesn't prove anything"

    2. "So… is CR and a bunch of douche-nozzles on YouTube going to buy the Galaxy Note Edge to see how it holds to being bent? […] Clearly people look to use any negative press against Apple to create buzz for themselves so this makes one very suspicious."

    3. "But note that [CR] only test the center of the device […] it really doesn't give you a complete picture."

    4. "The only pat on the back I give CR in this case is testing more devices than I would have expected them to test and for going to the extreme to see when they split apart completely. In the end this is just a silly publicity stunt."

    5. "The bottom line comes down to, "Is the device going to bend in your pocket or under any other normal wear and tear? If the answer is no, then there is nothing else to consider."

    the antenna was re-designed when the 4S arrived

    Again, nope. Same antenna design required for CDMA iPhone 4.


    PS: It's about time Teckstud got another username banned.
  • Reply 105 of 254
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    The proof is in the pudding. How many people are returning bent phones to Apple stores or calling AppleCare to get a bent phone replaced? We've seen photos of bent 5's but obviously it wasn't a widespread issue. And when the 5 first came out there were manufacturing issues that Apple had to resolve. Is it possible we have a similar situation here and maybe some defective phones are coming off assembly line?

    And to those saying the next version of this phone will be better....well no shit Sherlock. The HTC One (M7) had issues with gaps between the aluminum frame and plastic band. The One (M8) has a slightly different design and no longer uses the plastic middle band.

    6rhugy.jpg

    What I find amusing is in the CR test the HTC One fared worse than either iPhone 6 but yet basically everyone in the tech world has declared it the best designed smartphone ever.
  • Reply 106 of 254
    cnocbui wrote: »

    Oh you mean try and bend something like a LG G3 or a Samsung Note 3?  They did and both did commendably.

    Guess what, my I just did a bend test on a gold ring and a mild steel washer. The gold ring bent much easier than the mild steel washer. Guess that means the mild steel washer is the more valuable, desirable product.
  • Reply 107 of 254
    red oakred oak Posts: 1,099member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    So you're implying that the iPhone 5 was the minimal "structural integrity" that a smartphone should have? Does this "40% less structural integrity" affect usability? I don't think 00,000,009 documented cases out of an estimated 20,000,000 units sold counts as a design flaw. It's literally less than 1 in a million.

    No, that is not what I said

    The fact is the 6 is 46% less strong than the 5 based on this CR test. I think this is an enormous gamble by Apple and it will take several months to quantify. It could all mean nothing but has added risk

    As heavy user of Apple products and stockholder, I am very disppointed and concerned how the most expensive phone in the market holds up compared to others. I expect more from Apple
  • Reply 108 of 254
    pazuzu wrote: »
    Both are still substantially weaker than an iPhone 5 /5s which is  still unacceptable.
    The 6S and 6PLUS S will be improved- mark me. This is not over yet.

    Indeed.

    If Apple bring out a larger iPad, there is a good chance I will buy the iPhone 5s instead. I've been reading more reports elsewhere of guys saying even the 6 is too large for front pockets.
  • Reply 109 of 254
    relic wrote: »
    The S5 and Note 3 were both put through the same test and survived without any incident, Consumer Reports even said in their report that the Note 3 took the most weight out of all the phones tested until it broke, 150lbs. I'm sure the Note 4 and Note 4 Curve will fair the same. Their plastic phones so they have some elasticity in them, they'll bend but won't break unless a very large amount of force is applied.

    Maybe in the bed test, but in the other destructive tests, the Apple devices came out on top.

    By the way, glad to hear from you again, haven't seen any posts from you in a while. Hope your OK.
  • Reply 110 of 254
    pazuzu wrote: »
    The 6S and 6PLUS S will be improved- mark me.
    Indeed.

    Really? You think next year's iPhone will have some advancements? Golly gee, are you sure you two want to go out on a limb like that? :rolleyes:

    red oak wrote: »
    I am very […] concerned how the most expensive phone in the market holds up compared to others.

    Very well: https://www.gazelle.com
  • Reply 111 of 254
    relic wrote: »
    The S5 and Note 3 were both put through the same test and survived without any incident, Consumer Reports even said in their report that the Note 3 took the most weight out of all the phones tested until it broke, 150lbs.

    So not without incident despite what you claim in your first sentence. All phones broke. How much force is present under normal wear and tear? What about forces applied to areas that aren't specifically with edge force with a single point at the center of the screen side? What real world example would this occur under?
    I'm sure the Note 4 and Note 4 Curve will fair the same.

    Well, if you're sure then there is no need to do any testing. :rolleyes:
    Their plastic phones so they have some elasticity in them, they'll bend but won't break unless a very large amount of force is applied.

    And how does the plastic wear compared to an aluminium alloy over prolonged use? Do you not remember the stickers Verizon gave out to "fix" some cheap Droid device whose battery covering kept popping off?
  • Reply 112 of 254

    The Note 4 and S6 will have metal frames. I wonder how well they would fare in these tests.

  • Reply 113 of 254
    BUTT whose butts could create pressure points like these test devices? I doubt anyone has butts as thin as these test devices.
  • Reply 114 of 254

    I don't think Apple should have stuck with the same big top and bottom bezel design as their smaller phones. The 6 Plus is quite a bit taller than the Note 3 even though it has a slightly smaller screen. It is right past the sweet spot of how tall even a "phablet" should be if you expect to keep it in your front pocket comfortably as your daily phone. I've owned the Note 2, Note 3, 6 Plus, Galaxy Mega, and ridiculously large Xperia Z Ultra. 



    The Note 2 and 3 didn't feel uncomfortable in my front pocket or feel subjected to a lot of pressure whenever I sat, while the other phones, which are all taller, were clearly not as comfortable and felt as if they were put under a lot more pressure whenever I sat down. The Z Ultra was so large, it was pretty much completely unusable as a daily phone.

  • Reply 115 of 254
    red oakred oak Posts: 1,099member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Really? You think next year's iPhone will have some advancements? Golly gee, are you sure you two want to go out on a limb like that? image

    Very well: https://www.gazelle.com

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    Really? You think next year's iPhone will have some advancements? Golly gee, are you sure you two want to go out on a limb like that? image

    Very well: https://www.gazelle.com

     

    You are an running amok on these message boards.  Is there anyone monitoring here at AI.com? 

  • Reply 116 of 254
    I don't think Apple should have stuck with the same big top and bottom bezel design as their smaller phones.

    I half-agree to (potentially) fully agree. I don't think it's a practical issue in hand, but it doesn't look as slick as the HTC phones. I half-agree because the "forehead" doesn't need to be so large but the chin may have to be for the Home Button with Touch ID. Now if they could make it look more like Samsung's wide and short Home Button but still be as effective or better than it is now for both functions I'd be more than happy to have the chin reduced.
  • Reply 117 of 254
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I'm not bridgineer but if you take the same design of the iPhone 5 and keep the thickness of it the same but made it's length that of the iPhone 6/6+ wouldn't it not bend with less force due to the longer suspension?

    Yup, or the bending moment would be greater on a 6+ for the same force, but longer moment arm. The 5s probably has a different cross section/ reinforcements etc that affects the bending also 5s. Which leads to did CR adjust the fulcrum length for the longer 6+. But the question still stands-does matter in real world use? After we all, we could drive m1 tanks to be safer too. What is the standard bending resistance ability that one should design for?
  • Reply 118 of 254
    boeyc15 wrote: »
    Yup, or the bending moment would be greater on a 6+ for the same force, but longer moment arm. The 5s probably has a different cross section/ reinforcements etc that affects the bending also 5s. Which leads to did CR adjust the fulcrum length for the longer 6+. But the question still stands-does matter in real world use? After we all, we could drive m1 tanks to be safer too. What is the standard bending resistance ability that one should design for?

    What I'm worried about is future iPhones having to waist internal space that be used for the battery or other HW because they expect a yearly check on the bending despite no real world value to how this affects the device because it would be perceived as frail if bends under a slightly lower force.

    Where are the tests for premium watches to see how strong their bands can be pulled before they snap? Is the value of a watch determined on such a parameter if it's otherwise well within the range of normal use?
  • Reply 119 of 254
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,331member
    boeyc15 wrote: »
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I'm not bridgineer but if you take the same design of the iPhone 5 and keep the thickness of it the same but made it's length that of the iPhone 6/6+ wouldn't it not bend with less force due to the longer suspension?

    Yup, or the bending moment would be greater on a 6+ for the same force, but longer moment arm. The 5s probably has a different cross section/ reinforcements etc that affects the bending also 5s. Which leads to did CR adjust the fulcrum length for the longer 6+. But the question still stands-does matter in real world use? After we all, we could drive m1 tanks to be safer too. What is the standard bending resistance ability that one should design for?

    I doubt that they adjusted, because the increased moment due to the length is real - in terms of how it affects load to failure. The reduced load to failure, relative to the 5, is not entirely explained by the increased length though- the remainder is probably just the design change in device thickness, material thickness etc.. The 6+ having higher load to failure than the 6 is curious in that context.
  • Reply 120 of 254
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    You really should practice your reading comprehension.



    "This test by CR doesn't prove anything"

    "So… is CR and a bunch of douche-nozzles on YouTube going to buy the Galaxy Note Edge to see how it holds to being bent? […] Clearly people look to use any negative press against Apple to create buzz for themselves so this makes one very suspicious."

    "But note that [CR] only test the center of the device […] it really doesn't give you a complete picture."

    "The only pat on the back I give CR in this case is testing more devices than I would have expected them to test and for going to the extreme to see when they split apart completely. In the end this is just a silly publicity stunt."

    "The bottom line comes down to, "Is the device going to bend in your pocket or under any other normal wear and tear? If the answer is no, then there is nothing else to consider."

    Again, nope. Same antenna design required for CDMA iPhone 4.





    PS: It's about time Teckstud get another username banned.

     

    S IS FOR SIGNAL.

    And again you got it ?WRONG. Even AI reported it as so:

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/11/10/13/inside_apples_iphone_4s_and_its_improved_antenna_s_is_for_signal

     

    PS:  I have no idea who's name you keep trolling but nothing you say makes sense anyways so not surprised.

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