AAA says Apple's Siri causes potentially dangerous driver distractions

245

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 89
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,418member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Iphone 3gs View Post



    AAA says that looking out the window is a distraction apparently everything is dandrous soon we won't be able to eat food while driving which apparently is a distraction

    Eating?  I think that's been illegal for years at least in a lot of US states.

     

    On the other hand, I think you are encouraged to look out the window known as "the windshield"...

  • Reply 22 of 89
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member
    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

    the cognitive load to work abstract processes or workflows (such as composing Facebook posts or emails) w/ a non-human is higher than simply having a conversation w/ a real person on the phone

     

    Except you’re just having a conversation with Siri.

  • Reply 23 of 89
    I've seen some pretty bad charts, and that's one of them.
  • Reply 24 of 89
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post



    Dumb study is dumb. Where did they correlate the "distraction" with being dangerous?



    Being mentally distracted doesn't necessarily mean dangerous driving conditions. 

     

    uh, yes, it does. being distracted while driving is unequivocally dangerous. by nature. that you haven't had an incident thus far in no way disproves this.

  • Reply 25 of 89
    This report is by idiots, of idiots, for idiots.
  • Reply 26 of 89
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

     

    Yes, using Siri can distract, about as much as talking on the phone while driving. But I can't for the life of me understand why it would be MORE distracting than doing shit tat takes your eyes off the road. 


     

    no -- using a computer-driven voice assistant is MORE distracting than talking on the phone. because it takes more mental work to queue your commands, issue instructions, await feedback, parse result, and possibly re-query. all those things take cognitive work -- far more than having a conversation with a native speaking human. likewise, it's already been proven that having a phone conversation uses more brainpower than speaking to a real person. etc. basically the further you get from a (visual) face-to-face convo, the less efficient we become. old studies.

     

    and depending on the specific tasks of each, can be more work than taking your eyes off the road to do something. 

     

    but yeah -- a good follow up study would be comparing Siri to other brands.

  • Reply 27 of 89
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    Except you’re just having a conversation with Siri.




    nope. as i mentioned, you're not. you're searching for appropriate keywords, chaining them into system-accepted commands, awaiting possible syntax errors, parsing response, and re-issuing commands. it uses more brainpower than speaking in a native language to a real person. and speaking on the phone uses more brainpower than talking to a passenger.

     

    ever wonder why we instinctively turn down the radio when looking for an address? same thing -- the aural input is a cognitive distraction.

     

    look i love apple as much as the rest of you (read my troll-hunting comments), but this is established science that goes beyond anybody's favorite brand.

  • Reply 28 of 89
    "...hands-free systems employed by popular car manufacturers..."

    Yup AAA - always best to use Apple in your lede - get those clicks above anything else.

    Why not Google? People on their Androids not speaking into Google Search app? Goggle Maps app?

    Or maybe AAA is losing customers so fast because people use their phones, it's best to try and smear them.
  • Reply 29 of 89
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member
    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

    nope. as i mentioned, you're not. you're searching for appropriate keywords, chaining them into system-accepted commands, awaiting possible syntax errors, parsing response, and re-issuing commands. 

     

    Which is exactly the same as holding a conversation.

     


    ever wonder why we instinctively turn down the radio when looking for an address? same thing -- the aural input is a cognitive distraction.


     

    So just slow down as you talk to Siri or the person sitting next to you.

  • Reply 30 of 89
    Okay. I'll give this idea away for free. All we need is a Siri blow up doll to put in the passenger seat. It will be just like talking to a real human. Maybe even better.
  • Reply 31 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    Except you’re just having a conversation with Siri.


    Actually, the study (which took the time to quantify real observations) says the opposite.

     

    You're not having a conversation (philosophically speaking), and Siri messes up all the time—you're feeding words into a pretty picky computer, and trying to get it to respond the way you want it to (Have you ever tried to make an appointment with a number or date in it using Siri? Brain-numbing...). You tell me you're "just having a conversation" while merging into rush hour traffic, messing with the radio, listening to your favorite news, and screaming at your phone to wake up Siri.

     

    Not just a conversation.

     

    Also, for the love of God, could you please, for once, admit that others' views could be valid, even if they conflict with yours? I mean seriously....

  • Reply 32 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

    not sure why they did the study on "Siri" by name. did they compare it to other software agents for comparison? is Siri worse than those? possibly, who knows. worth studying tho.


     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

     

    What a crock of horse-shit. Where was this study on Microsoft Sync? Or Android Auto? Or the other 56,201 voice recognition systems built into many cars in the last few years? Oh yeah, those studies wouldn't have generated enough clicks. 

     


     

    This is more of a media headline problem than a study problem. The study clearly states:

     

    "There are other  voice-recognition systems (e.g., Google Now, Microsoft Cortana, etc.) that were not tested in the current evaluation. It is possible that these systems differ in cognitive workload, resulting in variability much the same as what we observed with in-vehicle car commands, but additional research will be required to verify this. Even so, it is unlikely that the ratings of these voice-recognition systems would drop below 3, the level we obtained with a perfect speech recognition system."

     

    The study's title is:

    "Measuring Cognitive Distraction in the Automobile II: Assessing In-Vehicle Voice-Based Interactive Technologies"

     

    I think the media (not just AI) is responsible for the Siri muckraking here.

  • Reply 33 of 89
    I drive a truck all day and use siri to find addresses the fact that there is no way to let siri or maps know that i am not allowed on parkways in my truck and the fact that siri in spite of clear address and citi instructions keeps finding me directions from long island to Nebraska or Mississippi can be distracting . i have a phone holder with a suction cup on my windshield but if maps has a wrong state it is not exactly smooth to select the wrong state type in the right one . half the time maps blanks out the whole field . struggling with this has caused me a few close calls . i have been routed into state park bike trails and walking paths most trouble being that you get a direction that says go north on route 79 and in the woods on a cloudy day north may not be so obvious . siri and maps need some work they are about 75% google has a preference to route me with out highways but i hate using anything google and they want me to have an account and a g mail to get the full package and I'm getting enough push junk as it is. i drive about 150 miles a day and i see a lot of handsets on the ear.
  • Reply 34 of 89

    Let me tell you a fact: while AAA is great for emergency roadside service, they are one of the most out-of-touch organizations in the US; their membership is dwindling every year and they still think people "love" their paper maps. (Printed TripTiks, yay!) 

     

    This is a desperate attempt to seem relevant; all they did was state the obvious: it's distracting to check your calendar, update your social network accounts, text, etc. while you're driving. Duh...

     

    Advice for AAA: stick to rating those chintzy motels and sponsoring drag racing events, then die a peaceful death.

  • Reply 35 of 89
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    Often when I ask Siri a question she simply shows a list of what she found on the web which is useless when driving. I'm not tempted to read it but I imagine some people are.


     

     

    I'm very happy to see a post from you.

  • Reply 36 of 89
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,385member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     



    nope. as i mentioned, you're not. you're searching for appropriate keywords, chaining them into system-accepted commands, awaiting possible syntax errors, parsing response, and re-issuing commands. it uses more brainpower than speaking in a native language to a real person. and speaking on the phone uses more brainpower than talking to a passenger.

     


     

    I'm sorry, but I think you're sensationalizing this just a tad. Not sure how most people use Siri, but these are my most common phrases:

     

    "Check what movies are playing tonight"

    Navigate to X

    Text X and tell him I'm on the way

    Play X song

    Whats the weather like today

     

    Dunno, most things are done with natural language. 

  • Reply 37 of 89
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

     

    What a crock of horse-shit. Where was this study on Microsoft Sync? Or Android Auto? Or the other 56,201 voice recognition systems built into many cars in the last few years? Oh yeah, those studies wouldn't have generated enough clicks. 

     

    Yes, using Siri can distract, about as much as talking on the phone while driving. But I can't for the life of me understand why it would be MORE distracting than doing shit tat takes your eyes off the road. 

     

    I also found this comment astute:

     

    Quote:

     “Evaluated sending/receiving texts, updating Facebook/Twitter and checking calendar by using voice commands while driving.”



    Seriously? THAT'S what you tested? The only thing on that list I would actually do in the car is send a text, which is extremely easy. "Tell Bob I'm on way." 



    Why not test map navigation, which is equally simple? "Take me to Panera Bread" or "Take me home"



    Why not test music? "Play my Driving playlist"



    You see, AAA wants Siri to fail, because it makes a great headline. If Siri turned out to be good, or even middle of the pack, Mac Rumors and everyone else wouldn't share this headline. It turns out if you attack the most successful company in the world, you get a lot of press. :rolleyes:



    And yeah, as someone else said, their recommendation is probably that you join AAA and use their paper Trip Tik maps, because those aren't at ALL distracting. :eek:


     

    Yeah, lets test the least common usage scenarios for Siri to push an agenda, instead of the stuff that people will actually use. 


     

     

    You and your vulgar crocks. Try and follow Shakespeare's example of varying your insults more; they'll be more entertaining to read.

     

    You love to always see the worse side of things in relation to Apple. It's evidently not occurred to you that the AAA are handing Apple a compliment in citing Siri, as it suggests that it is sufficiently popular to resonate with the general public.

     

    At any rate, your whining is unjustified. See NolaMacGuy's post for enlightenment. And you underestimate the stupidity of drivers if you think that they will only use Siri for simple tasks. There's a reason why there are thousands of people killed by drivers every day, most of which is attributable to human error, not vehicle breakdown.

  • Reply 38 of 89
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post



    This report is by idiots, of idiots, for idiots.

     

     

    Because none of the drivers who cause incalculable deaths and their accompanying misery and suffering are idiots...no, they were just in the wrong place at the wrong time.

  • Reply 39 of 89
    So to sum up what can actually be concluded by this study, they found that distraction increases with the complexity of the task. Brilliant. Who would have guessed? The really remarkable thing is that people got paid to "discover" this. Perhaps a better study would have compared the difference in distraction caused by using different methods of performing the SAME task.
  • Reply 40 of 89
    macinthe408macinthe408 Posts: 1,050member
    AAA: "Well, we do admit that we need the clickthroughs to our website, and nothing is better click bait than putting 'Apple' in an article. If we said Google Voice, no one would give a shit. But put in 'Siri' and the hits to our website increase tenfold!"
Sign In or Register to comment.