Production of Apple's larger iPad reportedly delayed as suppliers focus on iPhone 6

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  • Reply 21 of 51
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    cali wrote: »
    More proof a 12.9" iPad is coming. Even a blind man can.....

    ...eat a hamburger?
  • Reply 22 of 51
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Does anyone know if the force sensitivity on the Apple Watch is working on binary (yes/no) or continuous level? If it measures force continuously they might apply this tech to the big iPad in order to have people use this as a drawing tablet alternative. so instead of carrying your MBA plus Wacom you just carry this iPad.

    Frankly, my interpretation of the different levels of force applied on the Apple Watch screen was that it was merely sensing more finger surface area contact (basically what happens when one pushes harder on a flat surface...the skin and muscle squishes and deforms, not the watch display).
  • Reply 23 of 51
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    Weren't there some people on this site who swore up and down that having multiple, larger iPhone screen sizes was a dumb idea? The same people who said having a smaller iPad was also a bad idea? Lol.

    You left out a 1.5" screen sized watch.
  • Reply 24 of 51
    Frankly, my interpretation of the different levels of force applied on the Apple Watch screen was that it was merely sensing more finger surface area contact (basically what happens when one pushes harder on a flat surface...the skin and muscle squishes and deforms, not the watch display).

    Ah. Makes sense. Thank you.
  • Reply 25 of 51
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,526member
    Different tech. iPhones use LTPS, whereas iPads use IGZO. IGZO is cheaper and easier to manufacture than LTPS, but LTPS has even lower power consumption, it makes more sense for an iPhone where battery size is limited.

    Which is why it's hard to take yet another supply chain story from the WSJ seriously. The quote from the mystery "source" implies that the same display maker is supplying what should be both LTPS and IGZO from the same fab lines. I find that hard to believe without some solid explanation.

    Maybe look for some real non paywall journalism here. I agree that the tech for the two sizes might well be different, and LTPS seems unlikely for larger panels than the iP 6+.
  • Reply 26 of 51
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post





    Frankly, my interpretation of the different levels of force applied on the Apple Watch screen was that it was merely sensing more finger surface area contact (basically what happens when one pushes harder on a flat surface...the skin and muscle squishes and deforms, not the watch display).



    It would be quite an advance in the iPad if they could more generally detect pressure differentials though. Should open up some new applications. Also the haptic feedback could one day make it to bigger devices.

  • Reply 27 of 51
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post

    It would be quite an advance in the iPad if they could more generally detect pressure differentials though. Should open up some new applications. Also the haptic feedback could one day make it to bigger devices.

     

    What about that one screen that simulates different textures being touched by changing the capacitance of whatever?

  • Reply 28 of 51
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    What about that one screen that simulates different textures being touched by changing the capacitance of whatever?




    That would be very cool! Write protected files could feel hard. Keys on the virtual keyboard could feel like real plastic. Keys on a swipe keyboard could feel like an ice rink.

  • Reply 29 of 51
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post

    That would be very cool! Write protected files could feel hard. Keys on the virtual keyboard could feel like real plastic. Keys on a swipe keyboard could feel like an ice rink.

     

    This isn’t the one I saw (it was on a tablet), but here’s another implementation of that idea.

     

    Seems that you’d want a virtual keyboard’s keys to have as much friction as possible with the gaps between them being slipperier. Or the other way around, with the gaps providing the friction to keep you from slipping to another key.

     

    EDIT: Found it, though I like Disney’s implementation better as it’s voltage rather than ultrasonics.

  • Reply 30 of 51
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    This isn’t the one I saw (it was on a tablet), but here’s another implementation of that idea.

     

    Seems that you’d want a virtual keyboard’s keys to have as much friction as possible with the gaps between them being slipperier. Or the other way around, with the gaps providing the friction to keep you from slipping to another key.

     

    EDIT: Found it, though I like Disney’s implementation better as it’s voltage rather than ultrasonics.




    It's surprising the resolution they can achieve, e.g. the strings on the Japanese Zither or the individual bumps on the crocodile's back. I'm sure Apple must be experimenting with this in their labs.

  • Reply 31 of 51
    What about that one screen that simulates different textures being touched by changing the capacitance of whatever?

    Wasn't there a patent from apple on this kind of idea?

    Edit: here it is: http://iphone.appleinsider.com/articles/12/05/03/apple_shows_continued_interest_in_haptic_touchscreen_fingertip_feedback
  • Reply 32 of 51
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post





    Wasn't there a patent from apple on this kind of idea?



    Patents are not issued for ideas, they are issued for implementations.

  • Reply 33 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    dugbug wrote: »
    If this is true it falls in the "good problem to have" category. Congrats on the iPhone 6 apple it's off the hook good. Now make me a new mini damn it

    That is a big "if". We don't even know if the screens are the same technology. I have a hard time imagining that large screens are produced on the same production lines as the smaller lines. Especially when you are talking cell phone screens where it would pay to have customized production lines.
  • Reply 34 of 51

    Patents are not issued for ideas, they are issued for implementations.

    Sure enough. Sloppy wording. Concept for implentation of idea. Better? ;)
  • Reply 35 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    rogifan wrote: »
    I'm really curious to know what this device might be like. Is it just the current iPad with a bigger screen? Is the software modified to take advantage of the bigger screen? Does it have pen support like the Surface does? Inquiring minds want to know.

    There are so many possibilities that it doesn't even pay to guess. As for taking advantage of the larger screen, of course software will have to be updated to do that, just like it has been for every other new iOS device. As for pen support I'm still not convinced that Apple would want to bother with that extra capability. The interested market is too small.
  • Reply 36 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    ascii wrote: »
    It's funny to think they can't hire enough people in China, with their massive population. I wonder if it's possible to design future iPhones and iPads to be less labour intensive to make? Or else open factories in India, another 1bn+ country.

    people are useless without the training to do the job and the capital inlace to allow them to do the job. If you manufacture a production line to make X number of items per year hiring more people will not allow that line to make more product. You have to build an entirely new production line and possibly new production lines at component suppliers.

    In the end having your production line maxed out is not really a good thing for a company. it means they are leaving customers in line waiting for product.
  • Reply 37 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    :D
    rogifan wrote: »
    Interesting side note, Jony Ive was involved in the design of at least one Newton device. And Michael Tchao, who now oversees iPad marketing (you can see him in the iPad mini product intro video) also worked on the Newton back in the day. Not all Sculley ideas were bad. Who knows where Newton would have gone if Steve hasn't killed it.

    Note also that Steve only killed it because the company only had a couple of months before it went bankrupt. I was always left with the impression that he really had to do a lot of things he didn't like around that time. If Steve really hated the Newton he would have sold off the technology to generate cash for the company, he didn't do that apparently seeing value in the device.
  • Reply 38 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Does anyone know if the force sensitivity on the Apple Watch is working on binary (yes/no) or continuous level? If it measures force continuously they might apply this tech to the big iPad in order to have people use this as a drawing tablet alternative. so instead of carrying your MBA plus Wacom you just carry this iPad.

    The assumption here is that there is a market large enough to justify the hardware to support a stylus. I don't see it unless they can deliver a refined hand writing recognition system that would appeal to a wider audience. The reality is Apple probably would sell more Xserves than styluses and we all know what happened to the Xserve.
  • Reply 39 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member

    Patents are not issued for ideas, they are issued for implementations.

    Where did you get that idea from?
  • Reply 40 of 51
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,304member
    wizard69 wrote: »
    :D
    Note also that Steve only killed it because the company only had a couple of months before it went bankrupt. I was always left with the impression that he really had to do a lot of things he didn't like around that time. If Steve really hated the Newton he would have sold off the technology to generate cash for the company, he didn't do that apparently seeing value in the device.
    One thing Steve didn't like was his own children using iPads, or spending inordinate time with any other tech products. Felt it just wasn't good for them. Many others in the valley reportedly share the same view, even going so far as sending their sons and daughters to exclusive private schools like the Waldorf where computers are avoided altogether in the classroom. Instead there's emphasis on hands-on learning . Old school indeed!

    Suppose it shouldn't be any surprise that some of the bright minds creating the best tech are more aware of the dangers of being too wedded to it.
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