Production of Apple's larger iPad reportedly delayed as suppliers focus on iPhone 6

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  • Reply 41 of 51
    unicronunicron Posts: 154member
    So a mere WEEK before the next Apple Event, Apple decides to delay a product? Riiiiiiiight.

    I love all these analysts covering their butts by claiming has magically and conveniently changed their mind about a product mere days before it's supposed to launch. Not to mention their manufacturers would have been assembling them for months and months to build up enough inventory before launch.
  • Reply 42 of 51
    ash471ash471 Posts: 705member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ascii View Post

     

    It's funny to think they can't hire enough people in China, with their massive population. I wonder if it's possible to design future iPhones and iPads to be less labour intensive to make? Or else open factories in India, another 1bn+ country.


    It's not just labor. Those people have to have a building to work in, equipment to run, and supervisors to train and manage the people. Ask anyone that has tooled a factory and they will tell you just how amazing Apple is for doing what they do. 

  • Reply 43 of 51
    ash471ash471 Posts: 705member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Supply constraints rumored right before an Apple event. What a shocker! /s

    Seems pretty obvious what happened.  The sapphire display was suppose to free up display inventory to allow for a larger iPad. When Apple killed the GTAT contract, they shifted iPad display production to iPhone 6.  Who knows when we'll see a larger iPad now. 

  • Reply 44 of 51
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



    image

    Note also that Steve only killed it because the company only had a couple of months before it went bankrupt. I was always left with the impression that he really had to do a lot of things he didn't like around that time. If Steve really hated the Newton he would have sold off the technology to generate cash for the company, he didn't do that apparently seeing value in the device.


    One thing Steve didn't like was his own children using iPads, or spending inordinate time with any other tech products. Felt it just wasn't good for them. Many others in the valley reportedly share the same view, even going so far as sending their sons and daughters to exclusive private schools like the Waldorf where computers are avoided altogether in the classroom. Instead there's emphasis on hands-on learning . Old school indeed!



    Suppose it shouldn't be any surprise that some of the bright minds creating the best tech are more aware of the dangers of being too wedded to it.

     

     

    Good for him.

  • Reply 45 of 51

    Shame if the big iPad is delayed.

     

    Even though the iPhone is overwhelmingly the big profit generator at Apple, I think that the iPad is more important longer term, so it concerns me if they are not putting sufficient focus and resources that way. I accept that it may be out of their hands.

  • Reply 46 of 51
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Instead there's emphasis on hands-on learning . Old school indeed!

    Personally I'm more of a fan of Montessori than Waldorf but both being based on hands-on and creativity. I'd think Waldorf would allow computer use, just not at a young age over learning fundamentals, but public schools do the same thing insofar that you don't get taught to use a calculator for maths until you are older.
  • Reply 47 of 51
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,557member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

    Shame if the big iPad is delayed.

     

    Even though the iPhone is overwhelmingly the big profit generator at Apple, I think that the iPad is more important longer term, so it concerns me if they are not putting sufficient focus and resources that way. I accept that it may be out of their hands.


    It would totally make sense for Apple to focus on the iPhone 6 considering the lengthy wait times for the 6 Plus.

  • Reply 48 of 51
    wizard69 wrote: »
    Where did you get that idea from?

    Wherever it came from, it will be implemented immediately.
  • Reply 49 of 51
    wizard69 wrote: »
    ascii wrote: »
    It's funny to think they can't hire enough people in China, with their massive population. I wonder if it's possible to design future iPhones and iPads to be less labour intensive to make? Or else open factories in India, another 1bn+ country.

    people are useless without the training to do the job and the capital inlace to allow them to do the job. If you manufacture a production line to make X number of items per year hiring more people will not allow that line to make more product. You have to build an entirely new production line and possibly new production lines at component suppliers.

    THIS is what makes Cook such a standout! He has had to make sure all those pieces come together at the right time. Apple has be planning several steps ahead on all their products; not just for the final assembly but also for all the pieces parts. If one part is not getting the needed yield, then Apple is scrambling to find alternate vendors or seeing what can be done to get the primary vendor's output up to the needed volume.

    I wouldn't be surprised if the sapphire production was one of those things Apple had to decide wasn't going to make the needed production date and volume for the iPhone 6 rollout and then switched back to glass to ship on time. It's almost as if the management of sapphire plant was counting on a big paycheck for their product and when they missed the ship date, they got nothing are were stuck with substantial inventory that Apple won't buy until the next generation of iPhones are released. Such are the fortunes of under-performing vendors with one primary customer.
  • Reply 50 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Personally I'm more of a fan of Montessori than Waldorf but both being based on hands-on and creativity.
    I think the trick is finding the right balance. There is good reason to stress math, English and science in schools but it needs to be balanced with contemporary arts and traditional creativity. I consider technology including computers to be a contemporary art.

    What has been missing in many schools is the hands on with the physical. Here things like shop class, art and crafts are important.
    I'd think Waldorf would allow computer use, just not at a young age over learning fundamentals, but public schools do the same thing insofar that you don't get taught to use a calculator for maths until you are older.

    One thing I'm always thankful for is a father that made sure I got lots of hands on. Sometimes it felt like work but in retrospect you learn a lot that you don't learn in most schools these days.
  • Reply 51 of 51
    Buy the iPads and iPhones for an amazing discount at freeappleiphone6.com
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