Walgreens memo suggests Apple Pay mobile payments with iPhone 6 could launch Saturday, Oct. 18

135

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 83
    I guess Apple expects to have no less than 1 billion iTunes accounts by October 18.
  • Reply 42 of 83
    tenlytenly Posts: 710member
    dcgoo wrote: »

    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">Oh </span>
    guess<span style="line-height:1.4em;"> what?  Want to safeguard your information with your fingerprint?  Get an iPhone 6.  </span>
    The<span style="line-height:1.4em;"> only device where that </span>
    actually<span style="line-height:1.4em;"> works.  </span>
    The<span style="line-height:1.4em;"> NFC pay process is not unique.  Apple has over a year's </span>
    worth<span style="line-height:1.4em;"> of Fingerprint experience.  Now tying it all together?  Clever clever clever!  </span>
    Innovate, my ass!  Only Apple can pull it off.

    It's not your fingerprint that safeguards your information. Safeguarding your information is inherent to the system. The retailer NEVER sees your information, nor is it saved on your device. When you initially register your card with Apple Pay, a randomized number is generated which associates your phone to your actual card number. This association is known only to your card issuer. Not to Apple and not to the merchant. If your phone is ever lost or stolen, this "randomized" number can easily be suspended or cancelled while you continue to use your physical card. Your fingerprint replaces the PIN and is required to authorize a purchase but does nothing towards safeguarding your information - because there is no exposed information that needs safeguarding!
  • Reply 43 of 83
    dcgoodcgoo Posts: 280member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tenly View Post





    It's not your fingerprint that safeguards your information. Safeguarding your information is inherent to the system. The retailer NEVER sees your information, nor is it saved on your device. When you initially register your card with Apple Pay, a randomized number is generated which associates your phone to your actual card number. This association is known only to your card issuer. Not to Apple and not to the merchant. If your phone is ever lost or stolen, this "randomized" number can easily be suspended or cancelled while you continue to use your physical card. Your fingerprint replaces the PIN and is required to authorize a purchase but does nothing towards safeguarding your information - because there is no exposed information that needs safeguarding!



    Absolutely correct. The finger print only authenticates a single payment transaction, and that authentication stays local to the device.  My point was that so far, Apple is the only DEVICE manufacturer that has put all the authentication pieces together into one very easy to use system.  I am sure the others will figure it out, or develop something that can compete with it.  But right now, IMO, Apple hit it out of the park with Apple Pay.  It will be huge. 

     

    The only problem I have now is having to upgrade the second iPhone in my house to support it.  The hand me down last years model rotation has served me well with reasonably priced upgrades every year....  until iPhone 6.  I will probably be buying a second one next month and selling the 5s after all <sigh>.    ...and yes I have a vested interest in seeing AAPL do well. :)

  • Reply 44 of 83
    Originally Posted by pmz View Post

    Yep, seems to me that iOS 8.1 with Apple Pay will be launching after the event on Thursday, or the following day Friday the 17th. Same story with Yosemite.



    Yosemite’s the 20th.

  • Reply 45 of 83

    As someone pointed out on another forum, Apple Pay is superior to Google Wallet (and Softcard or any other competing system) in three key areas:

     

    - It's more secure.

    - It respects your privacy.

    - It's the easiest to use/most convenient.

     

    And when it comes right down to it, those are the main areas that consumers will be interested in.

  • Reply 46 of 83
    blazarblazar Posts: 270member
    I blame the retailers for being too cheap to consider customer security as a major priority and the credit companies and their greed from making sure retailers changed terminals on a routine basis with upgrades.

    Basiclly credit card companies make extra money but dont provide a sufficient service.
  • Reply 47 of 83
    As someone pointed out on another forum, Apple Pay is superior to Google Wallet (and Softcard or any other competing system) in three key areas:

    - It's more secure.
    - It respects your privacy.
    - It's the easiest to use/most convenient.

    And when it comes right down to it, those are the main areas that consumers will be interested in.

    I'll give you the it's a little more secure.

    All the credit card companies sell your collective data. So no.

    Both Apple Pay and Google Wallet are equally as easy to use and both are just as convenient.
  • Reply 48 of 83
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SirLance99 View Post





    I'll give you the it's a little more secure.



    All the credit card companies sell your collective data. So no.



    Both Apple Pay and Google Wallet are equally as easy to use and both are just as convenient.

     

    Google Wallet is not as easy to use as Touch ID for making purchases.

     

    Credit card companies tracking your data is irrelevant - they do for ALL forms of payment. I'm talking about Google tracking your purchases made through Google Wallet. Apple Pay doesn't. You can't stop the credit card companies from logging your transactions, but you can prevent another third party (Google) who makes their money on collecting information about you from doing so.

     

    Apple Pay is more than just a "little more secure." They use the latest tokenization system (Wallet doesn't). Touch ID is superior (people can still see your PIN when used with Google Wallet). Apple doesn't store any credit card information about you. Wallet (and MCX) do on their servers. Another possible area that could be hacked to access your information.

  • Reply 49 of 83
    tenlytenly Posts: 710member
    Google Wallet is not as easy to use as Touch ID for making purchases.

    Credit card companies tracking your data is irrelevant - they do for ALL forms of payment. I'm talking about Google tracking your purchases made through Google Wallet. Apple Pay doesn't. You can't stop the credit card companies from logging your transactions, but you can prevent another third party (Google) who makes their money on collecting information about you from doing so.
    Apple doesn't store any credit card information about you. Wallet (and MCX) do on their servers.

    And let's not forget about the retailer themselves. I'm not sure if they have access to your information with Google Wallet, but they do with a plastic card swipe - and many retailers will also capture and store varying degrees of information about you, your card number and your purchase history/habits at their own store - to be added to their own databases and potentially sold or used to target you with custom tailored ads and promotions.

    With Apple pay, the retailer is left completely in the dark - almost as if you had paid by cash. I suspect that as more and more people start to use Apple Pay, retailers will attempt to "survey" you at checkout to populate similar databases. Some already ask for your postal code. I think some will expand on that with additional, personal questions.... (Although, if you swipe a store loyalty card, they've already gotcha.)
  • Reply 50 of 83
    sirlance99sirlance99 Posts: 1,295member
    Google Wallet is not as easy to use as Touch ID for making purchases.

    Credit card companies tracking your data is irrelevant - they do for ALL forms of payment. I'm talking about Google tracking your purchases made through Google Wallet. Apple Pay doesn't. You can't stop the credit card companies from logging your transactions, but you can prevent another third party (Google) who makes their money on collecting information about you from doing so.

    Apple Pay is more than just a "little more secure." They use the latest tokenization system (Wallet doesn't). Touch ID is superior (people can still see your PIN when used with Google Wallet). Apple doesn't store any credit card information about you. Wallet (and MCX) do on their servers. Another possible area that could be hacked to access your information.

    Absolutely it is. Google Wallet you enter a pin that takes all of less than a second to enter. Apple Pay you use your fingerprint which takes less than a second to enter. Google Wallet pays instantly. Apple Pay pays instantly. Both answer the prompts that the retailer asks of you such as "do you want to donate" "is this amount correct ". So both take the same amount of time and both are equally as fast and convenient.

    Yeah, I'm vested into Google services as it's extremely convenient for me with all my info as it allows me to use almost any relevant product in the world with a data connection to retrieve my info. Including my Apple products. I'm not scared of Google like some of you guys on here are. So no issue for me.

    You mean the pin I enter at 15 minutes before I checkout anytime I want throughout the store I'm in with absolutely no one around me to see. Yeah, not worried about that as I'm always extremely aware of my surroundings just in general everyday life.

    Remind me again the last time either Apple or Google credit card server information was hack? I'm no more concerned about Google getting hacked, than I'm concerned about Apple getting hacked with my credit card information stored on their servers for my Apple iTunes account. You know the one with 800 million credit cards that everyone talked about all the time. Which is impressive no doubt.

    I'll report back to you when Apple updates iOS 8 for Apple Pay on my iPhone 6 Plus that I can't wait to use to pay with. While I wait, I'll continue to us my Google Wallet on which ever other Android phone I'm using for that day along side my iPhone.
  • Reply 51 of 83
    sirlance99sirlance99 Posts: 1,295member
    tenly wrote: »

    And let's not forget about the retailer themselves. I'm not sure if they have access to your information with Google Wallet, but they do with a plastic card swipe - and many retailers will also capture and store varying degrees of information about you, your card number and your purchase history/habits at their own store - to be added to their own databases and potentially sold or used to target you with custom tailored ads and promotions.

    With Apple pay, the retailer is left completely in the dark - almost as if you had paid by cash. I suspect that as more and more people start to use Apple Pay, retailers will attempt to "survey" you at checkout to populate similar databases. Some already ask for your postal code. I think some will expand on that with additional, personal questions.... (Although, if you swipe a store loyalty card, they've already gotcha.)

    Since Google Wallet uses a virtual number Master Card that has no information about you that gets relayed to the retailers. That's a non issue.

    Correct, just like with Google Wallet, Apple Pay hides your information. On both you'll still have to answer whatever questions they want to ask on the POS. I also agree with you that those questions will be expanded. Most, not all, have talked about how their loyalty cards will be able to tie into Apple Pay, so the whole "my information is secret" argument goes straight out the door right there.
  • Reply 52 of 83
    What's brilliant is that they use the payment terminals that Google financed for their failed Wallet program.
  • Reply 53 of 83
    dcgoodcgoo Posts: 280member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

     

     

    Apple doesn't store any credit card information about you. Wallet (and MCX) do on their servers. Another possible area that could be hacked to access your information.


     

    Actually, I thought iTunes was the repository for your credit card detail.  The card on file with iTunes is the default. Other cards can be added. But all stored in iTunes...   at least that is what I thought.  Apple does not collect or store any detail about your transactions. But they have you card information, I think.

  • Reply 54 of 83
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dcgoo wrote: »
    Actually, I thought iTunes was the repository for your credit card detail.  The card on file with iTunes is the default. Other cards can be added. But all stored in iTunes...   at least that is what I thought.  Apple does not collect or store any detail about your transactions. But they have you card information, I think.

    That's only your card on file for iTS/App Store/iBookstore and Apple Online Store purchases. They will also store your debit and CC info with iCloud Keychain. Neither of those are the same types of storage or usage that is defined by ?Pay. ?Pay uses a part of the A8 chip to store information, just like with Touch ID, securely. This is never sent to Apple.
  • Reply 55 of 83
    Oh good, another US only feature about to roll out. Maybe we in the UK could get iTunes Radio sometime soon. I am optimistic that apple pay will come here soon because we already have contact-less credit cards and readers are becoming commonplace so I guess it's just up to our banks to do the deal with Apple.
  • Reply 56 of 83
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,776member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    That's only your card on file for iTS/App Store/iBookstore and Apple Online Store purchases. They will also store your debit and CC info with iCloud Keychain. Neither of those are the same types of storage or usage that is defined by ?Pay. ?Pay uses a part of the A8 chip to store information, just like with Touch ID, securely. This is never sent to Apple.


    How will the ?Watch do the payment? There is no fingerprint touch on that is there?
  • Reply 57 of 83
    Oh good, another US only feature about to roll out. Maybe we in the UK could get iTunes Radio sometime soon. I am optimistic that apple pay will come here soon because we already have contact-less credit cards and readers are becoming commonplace so I guess it's just up to our banks to do the deal with Apple.

    Apple has more features and functions in products and services deployed internationally than any competitor.

    I believe Apple is considering how they might improve iTunes Radio which is, I suspect, the reason for the delay in international deployment.
  • Reply 58 of 83
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    How will the ?Watch do the payment? There is no fingerprint touch on that is there?

    Step 1: You pair the watch with certain iPhones, which will allow you to put the proper representational card numbers on ?Watch's Secure Element that it received from the bank via the iPhone.
    Step 2: You use a PIN to authenticate the ?Watch. This stays authenticated until it's removed.
    Step 3: You press the button next to the Digital Crown twice to set it up for an ?Pay payment, then accept or deny the payment info that comes on the ?Watch display after it connects with the merchant's NFC terminal.
  • Reply 59 of 83
    solipsismx wrote: »
    How will the ?Watch do the payment? There is no fingerprint touch on that is there?

    Step 1: You pair the watch with certain iPhones, which will allow you to put the proper representational card numbers on ?Watch's Secure Element that it received from the bank via the iPhone.
    Step 2: You use a PIN to authenticate the ?Watch. This stays authenticated until it's removed.
    Step 3: You press the button next to the Digital Crown twice to set it up for an ?Pay payment, then accept or deny the payment info that comes on the ?Watch display after it connects with the merchant's NFC terminal.

    Thanks for the explanation. I have to say, it sounds pretty fiddly. I feel they need to make it simpler somehow.
  • Reply 60 of 83
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Thanks for the explanation. I have to say, it sounds pretty fiddly. I feel they need to make it simpler somehow.

    Nothing fiddly about it and it's very simple.
Sign In or Register to comment.