Teardown of 27" Retina iMac reveals identical parts, construction as last-gen model

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 58
    I assume the lot of you read these codenames from Intel's marketing roadmap, decide that's the only thing worth buying, then demand this pink unicorn from each and every new Apple product. It's called the Anandtech Effect.
  • Reply 22 of 58
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,388member
    Just wait until Broadwell! The iMac battery will last for 10 hours¡
    So disappointed this still has Thunderbolt 2. That was so last year. Thunderbolt is getting stale¡

    You know someone will miss the sarcasm tag.

    With regard to Thunderbolt tho I'm fairly surprised that adoption outside of Apple themselves has been so slow. What's it been three years or so? Do you think licensing costs are still getting in the way? Can't imagine they're all that high.
  • Reply 23 of 58
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    With regard to Thunderbolt tho I'm fairly surprised that adoption outside of Apple themselves has been so slow. What's it been three years or so? Do you think licensing costs are still getting in the way? Can't imagine they're all that high.

    I think the issue with Thunderbolt isn't so much licensing costs but logistics. In the consumer market Apple is top dog. Those $500 notebooks simply aren't candidates for having Thunderbolt. Only Apple has the volume to make this commonplace. When you get to the higher-end you do see plenty of non-Apple products supporting TB (and/or DP) but I don't their volume is high enough to make a dent in the total traditional PC market. But I don't think it really matters because it doesn't matter how long it takes others to catch up so long as it satisfies Intel and Apple's needs.
  • Reply 24 of 58
    bobschlob wrote: »
    Goddammit! Every single time these guys come out with a "New" Mac it has the same identical parts as the previous model did (with the exception of the parts that are new, that is)

    Yes. It's the same identical parts with the exception of all the parts that are different and have been upgraded.
  • Reply 25 of 58
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

     

    I bet Apple wanted Broadwell in this new iMac in the worst way. Is it just me or did Schiller seem a little under enthused during his presentation? It's like he took a Xanax.

     

    If that's iFixit's take, that its all the same inside the new iMac except the monitor, that's a bit disingenuous. I'm a couple years from updating my iMac anyhow so I'm sure the innards will be up to iFixit's standards by then.




    Schiller ALWAYS seems like he doesn't want to be on stage. He sucks as a presenter. Tim Cook and Craig Federighi belong, Eddie Cue and Phil Schiller need to be replaced as presenters. Time to bring in a dynamic woman, and maybe bring in some color while they're at it.

  • Reply 26 of 58
    jim gramze wrote: »

    Schiller ALWAYS seems like he doesn't want to be on stage. He sucks as a presenter. Tim Cook and Craig Federighi belong, Eddie Cue and Phil Schiller need to be replaced as presenters. Time to bring in a dynamic woman, and maybe bring in some color while they're at it.

    Not sure that the last bits matter, they do need a better product presenter though. Schiller is a marketer, plain and simple. Not sure who they could grab, it needs to be someone who is actually knowledgeable, can be clever, and doesn't to be Steve.
  • Reply 27 of 58
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,388member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I think the issue with Thunderbolt isn't so much licensing costs but logistics. In the consumer market Apple is top dog. Those $500 notebooks simply aren't candidates for having Thunderbolt. Only Apple has the volume to make this commonplace. When you get to the higher-end you do see plenty of non-Apple products supporting TB (and/or DP) but I don't their volume is high enough to make a dent in the total traditional PC market. But I don't think it really matters because it doesn't matter how long it takes others to catch up so long as it satisfies Intel and Apple's needs.
    It matters in the sense that the selection of compatible peripherals is probably still slimmer than would have initially been expected.
  • Reply 28 of 58
    bigpicsbigpics Posts: 1,397member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



    ...Yeah it sucks that Broadwell isn't there but let's be honest it might never ship.

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



    Broadwell might never come out in an iMac. By the time this machine is ready for a refresh SkyLake or whatever it is called should be ready. That would be a nice upgrade, a new architecture with DDR 4 support.

    Not "when" but rather if. I can honestly see Apple saying screw it to Intel and telling them to get SkyLake on line or get lost. If Broadwell ships in early 2015 (doubtful) and they wait until this time next year to refresh then they might as well demand SkyLake from Intel.



    It is sad that Intel is screwing up so badly here but at least they aren't as bad off as AMD. I have this feeling though that if Broadwell does come it will be after mid year 2015. At least In a desktop form. Further I hope I'm wrong.

     

    While the "M" series Broadwells are out (in the latest Lenovo Yogas), the rest are still lagging.



    Meanwhile Intel says that Skylake is still on schedule ("mid 2015"), so in fact - if that's how it goes - Apple might skip using the Broadwell iteration altogether - and if other high-end PC manufacturers agree, only low-end Broadwells (and counter-intuitively some lagging server parts that never came out in Haswell) might ever come out (in the thrashing of OEM Win machines that change every few months and vary according to point-of-sale, e.g., a Best Buy model, a Walmart model, online only models, etc., etc.)..

  • Reply 29 of 58
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post





    Not sure that the last bits matter, they do need a better product presenter though. Schiller is a marketer, plain and simple. Not sure who they could grab, it needs to be someone who is actually knowledgeable, can be clever, and doesn't to be Steve.



    The last bits relate to Apple's very public push for diversity. I prefer the best person for the job myself.

  • Reply 30 of 58
    gilly33 wrote: »
    Great info but sickening how these guys tear down stuff. Gee

    Has iFixit ever dissected a frog, squirrel or pig on their site?
  • Reply 31 of 58
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Has iFixit ever dissected a frog, squirrel or pig on their site?

    No, but in their defense they tear things down for the purpose of figuring out how to fix it. Can't really do that with animals unless they are alive and I think there are rules in this country regarding DYI medical procedures.
  • Reply 32 of 58
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post



    They didn't upgrade any of the non-retina iMacs either, which means it's going to be another year. Damn you, Intel!



    You'd think if the internal layout was identical, that they would've upgraded the non-Retina iMacs, as well. I think they didn't because they really wanted to put the spotlight on the new Retina 5K iMac. It's a shame. Feels like they making decisions purely for marketing purposes.

  • Reply 33 of 58
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    It matters in the sense that the selection of compatible peripherals is probably still slimmer than would have initially been expected.

    What about mDP? How prolific is that with the cheap PCs? It's the same, free-to-license video protocol and port interface, so if the issue is about TB licensing then I'd expect mDP support would be high, and I haven't seen that in the cheap to midrange at this point.
  • Reply 34 of 58
    mpantonempantone Posts: 2,104member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    Has iFixit ever dissected a frog, squirrel or pig on their site?



    No, but there's a nice video on how to fix a wobbly ceiling fan.

  • Reply 35 of 58
    solipsismx wrote: »
    gatorguy wrote: »
    With regard to Thunderbolt tho I'm fairly surprised that adoption outside of Apple themselves has been so slow. What's it been three years or so? Do you think licensing costs are still getting in the way? Can't imagine they're all that high.

    I think the issue with Thunderbolt isn't so much licensing costs but logistics. In the consumer market Apple is top dog. Those $500 notebooks simply aren't candidates for having Thunderbolt. Only Apple has the volume to make this commonplace. When you get to the higher-end you do see plenty of non-Apple products supporting TB (and/or DP) but I don't their volume is high enough to make a dent in the total traditional PC market. But I don't think it really matters because it doesn't matter how long it takes others to catch up so long as it satisfies Intel and Apple's needs.

    From what I can gather reading up on the topic, it's all of the above: higher costs for transceiver chips and cables (compared to USB), Intel being persnickety about the TB vendors it would certify, and PC manufacturers' sensitivity to costs (given the low margin nature of that business). All conspired to result in low "natural" (read: "interest driven") adoption.

    There's a problem of market positioning. A common retort in tech threads says TB is never going to displace USB 3.0 blah blah. But that isn't why it exists. TB is going to make really fast external I/O possible, and while there's little or no need for that in traditional desktop "box" PCs with fast internal I/O (PCIe), it's going to allow for laptops and tablet PCs to do things that traditionally required desktop PCs. I don't think Intel has done a very good job of selling it because they don't build systems; they're a component supplier.

    There's also a difference in philosophy. PC vendors are waiting for their customer to want TB before adding it to their products ("demand driven"), where as Apple adopted TB before customers had even heard of it because it fit some design vision ("design driven"). PC vendors are playing chicken-and-the-egg with TB adoption, while Apple is basically laying TB eggs with every Mac they sell. The difference between waiting for a market and creating the market.
  • Reply 36 of 58
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member

    The new screen of the I mac Retina is great, but I think the Thinness franzy has gone to far. IMO. 

     

    My current I mac is a mid 2011 with a core I7 chip ,  a 256 GB SSD and 1 TB HD. Granted the SSD, the wake up time is excellent, and granted the 1 T HD, I have all the necessary place for all my photos. 

     

    Now in 2014, I have the choice to choose SSD (at a huge cost for 1GB) or a fusion drive. Fusion drive are not as performant than SSD. 

    For an all in one computer, I find this a little disappointing. Why can't we have both ? SSD does not take place at the contrary of SSD. 

    Please , Apple add, 2 mm in term of thickness and gave our the choice of two storage. 

  • Reply 37 of 58
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,418member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post

     

    Goddammit! Every single time these guys come out with a "New" Mac it has the same identical parts as the previous model did (with the exception of the parts that are new, that is)


    lol

     

    "...grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,

    the courage to change the things I can,

    and the wisdom to know the difference."

  • Reply 38 of 58
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,418member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

    Has iFixit ever dissected a frog, squirrel or pig on their site?


    No, but in their defense they tear things down for the purpose of figuring out how to fix it. Can't really do that with animals unless they are alive and I think there are rules in this country regarding DYI medical procedures.

    Except that doctors-in-training and curious scientist have been

    dissecting cadavers precisely to figure out how to fix things for centuries.:wow:

  • Reply 39 of 58
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

     

    I bet Apple wanted Broadwell in this new iMac in the worst way. Is it just me or did Schiller seem a little under enthused during his presentation? It's like he took a Xanax.

     

    If that's iFixit's take, that its all the same inside the new iMac except the monitor, that's a bit disingenuous. I'm a couple years from updating my iMac anyhow so I'm sure the innards will be up to iFixit's standards by then.


     

     

    I thought Schiller seemed unusually dour, too.

  • Reply 40 of 58
    "Identical parts, construction as last-gen model"

    except for the display, graphics, and CPU, other than that, yep, identical
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