Apple officially begins selling automated iAds in bid to boost mobile advertising business

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2015
Apple and a series of partners officially announced on Friday that the iAd network is now accepting "programmatic" mobile advertisement purchases, in a change that brings Apple in-line with other ad services.




Apple's plan to offer automated iAds leaked earlier this week when one of its partners, Rubicon Project, accidentally published a press release early. But those plans, and additional partners, became official on Friday when the new automated system debuted.

Joining Rubicon Project will be other ad tech companies like AdRoll, MediaMath, and The Trade Desk. Those platforms are also integrated with Apple's iAd Workbench tools to allow targeted, cross-device advertising campaigns directed at iPhone and iPad users.

With the change, iAd inventory will be bought and sold in an open marketplace, making it easier for advertisers to buy audiences. Programmatic buying enables advertisers to bid on placements through auctions, in a process that has proven popular through other advertising networks.




In its announcement, AdRoll said that customers will be able to run their campaigns through "Apple's proprietary, privacy minded consumer data sets gleaned through iTunes." Advertisers will be able to create and update their campaigns, retrieve analytics, and manage bids across iAd directly through participating third-party platforms.

"AdRoll has a long history of being first to market with new inventory sources and innovative functionality. We're excited to bring the power, precision and scale of programmatic buying to a high-quality, in-demand inventory source," said AdRoll President and CMO Adam Berke. "AdRoll is committed to bringing developers and advertisers of all sizes cross-device solutions for a world gone mobile."

MediaMath said its clients will now benefit from streamlined campaign setup & management, a wide range of reporting including metrics from tap-through rates to video completes, simplified billing, and early access to new features and functionality. One of its first iAd clients is L.L. Bean.

"With marketing budgets rapidly shifting towards programmatic, and the continued rapid growth of mobile, iAd brings a powerful combination of global scale, unique & rich data, and a high-quality user experience, allowing our clients to engage with their target consumers across an unprecedented range of apps and devices," said Ari Buchalter, COO of MediaMath.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 41
    I hope Apple can finally get some momentum with iAds. This is a great growth business that has gone almost nowhere
  • Reply 2 of 41
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,817member
    [I]"In order to allow AdRoll and our Advertisers to reach the best inventory online, we work with third party advertising companies (our “Advertising Partners”) to help us recognize you and serve relevant advertisements to you when you visit a website or online service in their network. We also work with Advertising Partners who help us recognize you across different devices in order to show you relevant advertisements. Our Advertising Partners may collect information about your activities on our website, our Advertisers’ websites, and other websites or online services in their networks. We also work with third party companies to assist us with website analytics such as evaluating the use and operation of our website so that we can continue to enhance the website and our services."

    "We may share your information with:

    ...We may share your information with service providers who assist us with serving relevant ads to you. We require by contract that our service providers only use your information in connection with the services they perform for us and not for their own benefit."
    " We share data derived from or relating to cookies, tracking pixels and other similar technologies with third parties that use AdRoll’s services so such businesses can target you with ads which they think you might be interested in based on your browsing behavior..."

    "AdRoll may target ads based on data provided by Advertisers or partners alone or in combination with the data we collect ourselves. Any data used to serve targeted advertisements is [B]de-identified and is not used to personally or directly identify you[/B]."[/I]

    [SIZE=4]Hmmm. De-identified. What's that mean? Is it like anonymised? Nope. [/SIZE]

    [I]"Data De-Identification
    [B]After 14 months from the date of collection, we de-identify the data that we collect by removing unique identifiers and truncating IP addresses.[/B][/I]

    Huh.
  • Reply 3 of 41
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,408member

    Crap...

    Will Ghostery or AdBlock, e.g., still work?

  • Reply 4 of 41
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    I'm confused. Where did Apple officially announce anything? And how is iAds different than Google advertising? Does iAd not track you?
  • Reply 5 of 41
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    I'm confused. Where did Apple officially announce anything? And how is iAds different than Google advertising? Does iAd not track you?



    If they are "selling audiences" then they must be profiling you. It says they are doing it through iTunes. There is a checkbox in iTunes Preferences to "limit ad tracking" but I don't know how far it goes.

  • Reply 6 of 41
    Sadly Apple's iAd is a necessary evil to tolerate, whilst they steal Google's revenue - and dig Google's grave.
  • Reply 7 of 41
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,349member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amoradala View Post



    Sadly Apple's iAd is a necessary evil to tolerate, whilst they steal Google's revenue - and dig Google's grave.

    The latter part of your statement is incorrect.

     

    Something like >90% of Google's revenue comes from ad sales, mostly from their proprietary Google AdWords service.

     

    By contrast, iAds does not contribute a significant amount to Apple's overall revenue. As a matter of fact, Apple doesn't even bother splitting it out as an individual statistic so its contribution to Apple's bottom line is nominal.

     

    iOS app developers are not required to use iAds (or any other mobile ad service for that matter). It is provided as a convenient optional source of revenue for app developers who wish to defray some of the costs of developing a free or freemium app.

     

    If you don't like apps with ads, don't use them. The App Store has enough variety where you should be able to find an app with similar functionality without ads. You might have to pay for it, but it's fair for the developer to expect some sort of compensation for his/her work.

  • Reply 8 of 41
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,817member
    mpantone wrote: »
    The latter part of your statement is incorrect.

    Something like >90% of Google's revenue comes from ad sales, mostly from their proprietary Google AdWords service.

    By contrast, iAds does not contribute a significant amount to Apple's overall revenue. As a matter of fact, Apple doesn't even bother splitting it out as an individual statistic so its contribution to Apple's bottom line is nominal.

    iOS app developers are not required to use iAds (or any other mobile ad service for that matter). It is provided as a convenient optional source of revenue for app developers who wish to defray some of the costs of developing a free or freemium app.
    What would be your opinion of dumping targeted ads altogether and websites charging you to use them rather than depending on ad revenue?
  • Reply 9 of 41
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

     

    The latter part of your statement is incorrect.

     

    Something like >90% of Google's revenue comes from ad sales, mostly from their proprietary Google AdWords service.

     

    By contrast, iAds does not contribute a significant amount to Apple's overall revenue. As a matter of fact, Apple doesn't even bother splitting it out as an individual statistic so its contribution to Apple's bottom line is nominal.

     

    iOS app developers are not required to use iAds (or any other mobile ad service for that matter). It is provided as a convenient optional source of revenue for app developers who wish to defray some of the costs of developing a free or freemium app.


    "It is provided as a convenient optional source of revenue for app developers who wish to defray some of the costs of developing a free or freemium app."

     

    That is how Apple executes iAd for now.  There are many areas Apple can expand that if they choose to

  • Reply 10 of 41

    Hey, When you visit a mobile site with an iAd on it, is there a way to "dismiss" the ad? I have not found a way to do so. And that surprises me, since it takes up so much screen real estate. I mean; certainly the purpose of iAds isn't to piss people off.

  • Reply 11 of 41
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by boredumb View Post

     

    Crap...

    Will Ghostery or AdBlock, e.g., still work?


    yes here is how:

     

    http://mewbies.com/ios-how_to_block_ads_in_ios.htm

     

    but have to open up the phone to do so and jailbreak every time a new release of iOS come out oh frack!

  • Reply 12 of 41
    roakeroake Posts: 620member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amoradala View Post



    Sadly Apple's iAd is a necessary evil to tolerate, whilst they steal Google's revenue - and dig Google's grave.



    No, it's not... not if you are implying that we need to tolerate loss of our privacy for the "greater good" of destroying Google.  Privacy should never be willingly surrendered, for any reason.  If you are just stating that Apple is going to do some annoying things until Google is bankrupt, well, if it generates revenue, it will never stop.

     

    All public corporations, including Apple, are in it for the money; they have a duty to their stockholders and the bank accounts of their executives.  It's true that Apple earns their money in a way that is less controversial than many other companies, but that is primarily just due to their business model (selling luxury hardware/devices); it's easy for Apple to take the high road because that road is going in their general direction anyway.  But I wouldn't believe for a second that Apple wouldn't start cutting throats if it meant their bottom line.

     

    Never surrender privacy or freedom, not for an instant, not for any reason.

  • Reply 13 of 41
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post

     

    Hey, When you visit a mobile site with an iAd on it, is there a way to "dismiss" the ad? I have not found a way to do so. And that surprises me, since it takes up so much screen real estate. I mean; certainly the purpose of iAds isn't to piss people off.


    iAds works in app as far as I can see , its not just for browsers and iTunes

     

    to stop it you have to jailbreak

    http://mewbies.com/ios-how_to_block_ads_in_ios.htm

  • Reply 14 of 41
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,349member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CanukStorm View Post

     

    "It is provided as a convenient optional source of revenue for app developers who wish to defray some of the costs of developing a free or freemium app."

     

    That is how Apple executes iAd for now.  There are many areas Apple can expand that if they choose to


    Yes, they have many options for changing the way they run their business, but I choose to judge them based on what they are doing right now, both as a customer and a shareholder.

     

    If they change their policy on how they use iAd acquired data, I will review the matter at that time. 

     

    I can't live life by making decisions solely based on what any given person and/or company could do in the long-term future. Heck, I wouldn't be able to drive a car or even pick out what to wear in the morning.

  • Reply 15 of 41

    Ghostery and alike should protect you on the browsers but when using an app they won't you will have to jailbreak to stop that

  • Reply 16 of 41
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

     

    Ghostery and alike should protect you on the browsers but when using an app they won't you will have to jailbreak to stop that. if I start seeing horrendous tasteless  banner ads within freemium apps I will jail break at that point


  • Reply 17 of 41
    robmrobm Posts: 1,068member
    bobschlob wrote: »
    Hey, When you visit a mobile site with an iAd on it, is there a way to "dismiss" the ad? I have not found a way to do so. And that surprises me, since it takes up so much screen real estate. I mean; certainly the purpose of iAds isn't to piss people off.

    As I understand it, a dev would have to provide a close or skip button in order for you dismiss the compelling content ;)
  • Reply 18 of 41
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,589member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by amoradala View Post



    Sadly Apple's iAd is a necessary evil to tolerate, whilst they steal Google's revenue - and dig Google's grave.



    The saving graze of iAds is that when you inadvertently click on one it doesn't take you anywhere, it just opens up 'window' on top which can then be closed and you are exactly where you left off. Nothing is worse when you are taken away from hat you were doing, or even when new browser windows are opened. I have occasionally clicked on an iAd to check out a product (a game), and done so without fear of my trust being abused with hard sell, pop-ups etc. Adverts being what they are iAds seem to be a better and less invasive method of ruining users days.

  • Reply 19 of 41
    For Apple to both compete with Google and make "free" and "freemium" models work for developers, this is how you split the baby (or bicycle, if you're a Seinfeldian).
  • Reply 20 of 41
    mpantone wrote: »
    The latter part of your statement is incorrect.

    Something like >90% of Google's revenue comes from ad sales, mostly from their proprietary Google AdWords service.

    By contrast, iAds does not contribute a significant amount to Apple's overall revenue. As a matter of fact, Apple doesn't even bother splitting it out as an individual statistic so its contribution to Apple's bottom line is nominal.

    iOS app developers are not required to use iAds (or any other mobile ad service for that matter). It is provided as a convenient optional source of revenue for app developers who wish to defray some of the costs of developing a free or freemium app.

    If you don't like apps with ads, don't use them. The App Store has enough variety where you should be able to find an app with similar functionality without ads. You might have to pay for it, but it's fair for the developer to expect some sort of compensation for his/her work.

    I remember when my kids were toddlers, there was a Disney app that launched an advert if they touched a 'Mickey Mouse' graphic.
    Steve jobs decided that no adverts were to be used on apps targeting children.

    Sadly, adverts now seem to be back in childrens apps.
    That is a shame.
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