Google's Nexus 6 abandoned fingerprint sensor after failed attempt to catch up with Apple's Touch ID

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Comments

  • Reply 81 of 93
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    No, no, absolutely ridiculous and no.



    Everything I stated was a fact so I don't see how you can say that. Saying "no no no" doesn't change that.

  • Reply 82 of 93
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

    Ask your handlers for the updated talking points sheet, please. It’s not 2010 anymore.


     

    Considering that Apple just gained quick toggles in 2013 with iOS 7 and third party keyboards + NFC for mobile payments in 2014 with iOS 8, Im not sure how you can refute those facts. The notification center is older as it was included with iOS5 if I remember correctly, but it was still with Android first. And Apple pretty much bought it from a developer that they hired who originally made it for jailbroken iOS devices.

  • Reply 83 of 93
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by K2kW View Post





    "entire" - that's not a fair criticism.

    they also stole from Java.



    It's hard to steal something when it is free.

  • Reply 84 of 93
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

     

    not sure why youre bragging about this when Android has copied/stolen/borrowed its entire existence from Apple.

     

     




    I never said Android didnt have the same features as iOS after the fact. I said that iOS copied/stole/borrowed features from Android. The point Im making is that Google isnt the only one that can be called a thief.

  • Reply 85 of 93
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by joshuarayer View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NolaMacGuy View Post

     

     

    not sure why youre bragging about this when Android has copied/stolen/borrowed its entire existence from Apple.

     

     




    I never said Android didnt have the same features as iOS after the fact. I said that iOS copied/stole/borrowed features from Android. The point Im making is that Google isnt the only one that can be called a thief.


     

     

    Indeed.

     

    Just as you're not the only person that can be accused of not proof-reading his post.

  • Reply 86 of 93
    Originally Posted by joshuarayer View Post

    ...Im not sure how you can refute those facts.


     

    Because they’re not facts and you don’t have a clue what you’re talking about.

  • Reply 87 of 93

    BWAHAHAHAHA POOR little Android try-hards! If only Google or Qualcom etc had any vision, they would've beaten Apple to the punch. 'If'.

    No sympathy for any of them at all.

  • Reply 88 of 93
    fallenjt wrote: »
    And that will place you under obstruction of justice when cops order you to only use THUMB.

    You can use any part of your hand so if the pigs force you to unlock it you can try your thumb or any other finger that you didn't scan and it won't work. In fact you don't need to say anything to the police. Any lawyer will tell you never talk to the police. Just keep silent say nothing if they ask you to open the phone use your thumb and it won't work. I use an area half way up my thumb , and theres no way anyone can guess that.
  • Reply 89 of 93
    paul94544paul94544 Posts: 1,027member

    It's hard to steal something when it is free.
    It wasn't free to take the kernel alter it and thereby destroy the open source concept. Java is controlled by oracle and that is why they sued Google for unfair use.
  • Reply 90 of 93
    TouchID seems amazing to me.
    Elegant, technically tight/secure, and seemingly uncopyable.

    Defintely something that highly leverages Apple's strengths (iOS sandboxed security model, App Store only binaries, secure element on chip...

    I am of the understanding that TouchID may simply not even be possible for other vendors, and may not even make sense for Apple on the Mac (walled garden app-store only devices aren't as appealing for the desktop due to all the legacy/external apps like Office or Photoshop that aren't sold through the App Store - and without that level of security it's not clear that TouchID couldn't be hacked from a rogue app).
  • Reply 91 of 93
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,321member
    r00fus wrote: »

    I am of the understanding that TouchID may simply not even be possible for other vendors, and may not even make sense for Apple on the Mac (walled garden app-store only devices aren't as appealing for the desktop due to all the legacy/external apps like Office or Photoshop that aren't sold through the App Store - and without that level of security it's not clear that TouchID couldn't be hacked from a rogue app).

    There's nothing to prevent other smartphone vendors from designing and implementing a feature similar to Touch ID. Nor is there anything preventing any other vendor from including a "secure element" on their smartphone. As a matter of fact for years Nexus smartphones included a secure element on the phone for handling NFC payment functions. So why did Google decide to open up Google Wallet a bit and no longer require a secure element embedded with the NFC chip? Not all Android licensees's NFC chips included it. To give Wallet a better chanced to succeed, and since Google does not dictate specific Android hardware to the manufacturers, they choose to remove the secure element requirement.

    FWIW I won't be surprised to see them go back to it sometime in the near future.
  • Reply 92 of 93
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