Apple Watch orders will be online-only during launch period due to strong demand

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  • Reply 61 of 170
    peteopeteo Posts: 402member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

    blame it on GTAT

     

    Why? have the try on start the 10th and order availability start the 17th.. easy. I'll take 1/1000th of Angela Ahrendts salary please
  • Reply 62 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    sog35 wrote: »
    So now you only believe information you hear first hand?  Seriously?

    Reuters is reporting it now also:
    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/apple-expects-smartwatch-demand-exceed-133841650.html

    Press release from Apple makes it official
    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/heres-exactly-youll-able-pre-130800950.html

    So here's a question that is unclear in all cases, including the press release: Will online preorders be handled at the store level or not? It would be unwise to have people try on watches, then allow them to walk out the door without encouraging them to place their preorder RIGHT THEN AND THERE with the assistance of an Apple employee, if they are so inclined. This is Sales 101... Close the deal!
  • Reply 63 of 170

    Slightly off-topic. Walked by the Samsung Store in our local mall to see a giant LED TV/billboard out in front. Just had to snap a picture. Click for full size.

     

     

     

    To clarify, since it's kinda dark, there are ZERO customers in the Samsung Store. So much for the "worth lining up for" on their giant TV. And yes, there are people in the mall (it's just after lunch). Since a lot of people don't like someone snapping their picture I had to wait a couple minutes until there was a break in the crowd.

  • Reply 64 of 170
    dickprinterdickprinter Posts: 1,060member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

    Remember this is the same guy that said Apple PURPOSELY makes fewer devices then demand for marketing reason.  Seriously.


    You cannot say with certainty that Apple does not employ this practice. It is used by many companies and brands, especially the high-end ones. I'm not saying this is the case with, especially, iPhones, because they sell themselves, but you can't say that they are not using it now with a new device in a nascent category.

     

    I spoke with the VP of N. American sales for Alfa Romeo at the International Auto Show in NYC this past weekend. We were discussing their line of cars and the fact that Alfa Romeo has a 9 month backlog for their vehicles, which surprised me. Alfa Romeo?.....seriously? I asked if it was because of interest in the new designs and, therefore, an increase in demand, and his answer was yes. He also said that they also started to adopt Apple's (he used their name specifically) marketing tactic of creating demand via constricted supply and he said that it has had a tremendous, positive effect on their sales.

     

    If there is low supply, regardless of demand, and a buzz is created about it, it draws interest to the item or device because it makes people wonder what all the hubbub is about and think that they're missing out on something. It's mental salivation.

  • Reply 65 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    You cannot say with certainty that Apple does not employ this practice. It is used by many companies and brands, especially the high-end ones. I'm not saying this is the case with, especially, iPhones, because they sell themselves, but you can't say that they are not using it now with a new device in a nascent category.

    I spoke with the VP of N. American sales for Alfa Romeo at the International Auto Show in NYC this past weekend. We were discussing their line of cars and the fact that Alfa Romeo has a 9 month backlog for their vehicles, which surprised me. Alfa Romeo?.....seriously? I asked if it was because of interest in the new designs and, therefore, an increase in demand, and his answer was yes. He also said that they also started to adopt Apple's (he used their name specifically) marketing tactic of creating demand via constricted supply and he said that it has had a tremendous, positive effect on their sales.

    If there is low supply, regardless of demand, and a buzz is created about it, it draws interest to the item or device because it makes people wonder what all the hubbub is about and think that they're missing out on something. It's mental salivation.

    Exactly.
  • Reply 66 of 170
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    peteo wrote: »

    Makes no sense why you wouldn't have the try on available before online sales went live.
    I think we're looking at this like an iPhone pre-order with a limited number of available units to ship by the 24th. Instead, Apple is offering so many varieties that there will be adequate volume to supply the orders by April 24th, and they just need to be custom assembled to match customer options. If nothing else, there's a pile of "guts" ready to go and Apple only need to fabricate more of a particular case and band.

    So I wouldn't be surprised to see the delivery date remain for the 24th even for watches pre-ordered up to a week later. It won't be like the iPhone which delivery dates begin slipping within 24 hours. That gives customers plenty of time to get in and see one before they order.

    I was thinking they should have started showing the watch in stores last Friday, and then starting pre-orders tomorrow, but if I'm right about supply, then it's pointless. Just offer preorders as soon as they can logistically get the watches into the stores.
  • Reply 67 of 170
    sog35 wrote: »
    Exactly.  Guy is bitching for no reason.  He already made up his mind no reason to bitch more.

    Remember this is the same guy that said Apple PURPOSELY makes fewer devices then demand for marketing reason.  Seriously.

    Remember? Really? I don't track who says what that closely. I can't even tell Hillstones from hill60. After a while it's just a blur. Maybe because it's really not important. You're going to get diversity of opinion in any sample population, and there isn't a forum rule that says everyone has to agree with you. That's just not going to happen.

    I'm all for banning trolls but a naysayer isn't automatically a troll. (Naysayers can turn into trolls if they don't respect the opinions of others or actively seek to provoke).
  • Reply 68 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    sog35 wrote: »
    So you agree with someone that agrees with your LIE?

    Again show me a single shread of evidence that proves that Apple artificially constraints supply at launches.  If you can't then its totally irresponsible to say they do.

    This is about controlling inventory, not manipulating customers. You are reacting as if Apple was being accused of something immoral or illegal. Get a grip!
  • Reply 69 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    sog35 wrote: »
    I never said to ban Spam.  The only reason I remember what Spam said in a previous thread is because it was so off the wall crazy.  

    I'm just saying there is no reason for someone who has made up his mind that he is not buying a product to post comments in topics about the product.  He is fully convienced he ain't buying it.  So the only purpose of his comments is to convience others not to buy it too.

    That is paranoid lunacy. My not buying the first gen watch will have no influence on someone who wants one. My concern was with the preordering process for those who are ordering. If the process of placing a preorder is inconvenient, it will be a difficult, confusing or unpleasant experience for customers. That I'm not ordering is beside the point.
  • Reply 70 of 170
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by robbiuno View Post



    "Apple's retail chief is apparently hoping to change customer opinion that the company's product launches come standard with long lines, constrained channel supply, and low in-store inventory."



    But reading between the lines they say there will be limited supply and low inventory.



    And all they've done is removed the ordering/buying queue and replaced it with picking up queuing.



    So this launch will be standard for Apple.



    No picking up queue at my front door, last I checked. People without front doors may have a problem.

  • Reply 71 of 170
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,811member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

     

    You cannot say with certainty that Apple does not employ this practice. It is used by many companies and brands, especially the high-end ones. I'm not saying this is the case with, especially, iPhones, because they sell themselves, but you can't say that they are not using it now with a new device in a nascent category.

     

    I spoke with the VP of N. American sales for Alfa Romeo at the International Auto Show in NYC this past weekend. We were discussing their line of cars and the fact that Alfa Romeo has a 9 month backlog for their vehicles, which surprised me. Alfa Romeo?.....seriously? I asked if it was because of interest in the new designs and, therefore, an increase in demand, and his answer was yes. He also said that they also started to adopt Apple's (he used their name specifically) marketing tactic of creating demand via constricted supply and he said that it has had a tremendous, positive effect on their sales.

     

    If there is low supply, regardless of demand, and a buzz is created about it, it draws interest to the item or device because it makes people wonder what all the hubbub is about and think that they're missing out on something. It's mental salivation.


    Unless you have evidence that Apple has ever used this "marketing" technique, I will consider you a "concern" troll for bringing this up. It may be that supplies are always constrained, but it is likely true that Apple would have preferred to have much more stock available for sale from day one. Such is the necessity to "ship in the the first quarter", which Apple has already fudged on.

     

    There were people in the past that stated the very same thing that you are stating, but about the iPhone, and there will certainly be people stating the same about the next new product that Apple launches.

     

    Same as it ever was.

     

    By the way. The problem with selling cars the way Alfa Romeo is selling them (evidently) is that dealers set themselves up for lost sales, even though the "buzz" is great. It might be that some other new car from another manufacturer will get the new "buzz" and steal all your potential sales.

  • Reply 72 of 170
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,535moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

    I see no problem with this policy.

     

    It is obvious there is supply constraints so why not get the supply perfectly correct with online pre-orders only.

     

    If they did walk-ins during the launch window Apple would have to guess how many of each model they would need to carry.  Of course that would be impossible to get it right.  One store may have too many Edition watches in stock and too few Sport and another store 500 miles away may have the exact opposite problem.

     

    This way they can match each customer with each watch and sell out all inventory as efficently as possible.


     

    This is exactly the right way to think about it.  During the initial roll-out of a product that has many SKUs, it's smart to manage inventory centrally rather than try to guess how many of each SKU to provide to each Apple store.  And from the roll-out period Apple will see patterns of buying for each SKU and so they will have a large amount of data from which to determine the overall, and per location popularity of each SKU.  This will make the task of supplying stores post-roll-out easy and more accurate.  

  • Reply 73 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    sog35 wrote: »
    And why are you concerned about the pre-order process if you are not buying the Watch under ANY circumstance?

    You have a serious problem with paying attention to details.

    Not buying the 1st gen watch. Again, THE FIRST GENERATION OF APPLE WATCH. Is anyone home?
  • Reply 74 of 170
    So here's a question that is unclear in all cases, including the press release: Will online preorders be handled at the store level or not? It would be unwise to have people try on watches, then allow them to walk out the door without encouraging them to place their preorder RIGHT THEN AND THERE with the assistance of an Apple employee, if they are so inclined. This is Sales 101... Close the deal!
    Apple stores have internet connected computers to access Apple site , plus I assume anyone buying a watch would have a phone capable of accessing the Internet. I dont get the concern. though. I doubt one of the smartest marketing companies on the planet isn't prepared to take appropriate actions to enhance sales, tho I doubt it will be crude cigar chompers "closing the sale" (not unlike my gramps)
  • Reply 75 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member

    Apple stores have internet connected computers, plus I assume anyone buying a watch would have a phone capable of accessing the Internet. I dont get the concern. though. I doubt one of the smartest marketing companies on the planet isn't prepared to take appropriate actions to enhance sales, tho I doubt it will be crude cigar choppers "closing the sale" (not unlike my gramps)

    The lack of clarity in Apple's press release has given rise to spin that makes it seem like you are on your own after you are given limited time to try on watches, then sent on your way to figure out what and where to place a preorder. This needs to be clarified because it's obvious that even people here are under the impression that they must place orders for watches they may not want in the hopes they'll get one they will want. Lack of clarity gives rise to speculation, which drives irrational behavior.
  • Reply 76 of 170
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,535moderator
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post





    Well it may only have 8GB storage, but only 2GB will be allowed for music, and only about 75mb for photos. So in terms of user available storage it seems like it's much less. But then it does so much more.

     

    I doubt the music will be stored on the Watch.  The Watch will be a controller for music stored on your iPhone.  It would make zero sense for Apple to expect those with large music libraries to have to pick and choose a subset of their music to download to the Watch when the Watch already needs your iPhone present to provide the earbud jack to wired earbuds/headphones or bluetooth connection to wireless earbuds/headphones or a bluetooth enabled stereo.  Remember, the bluetooth connection from your watch to the phone is BLE, not the same as the standard bluetooth connection used to beam music to wireless bluetooth speakers, earbuds and headphones.  Apple is neither going to fill up available storage on the Watch with music, nor are they going to suck the watch battery dry beaming music from it.

  • Reply 77 of 170
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,811member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post





    The lack of clarity in Apple's press release has given rise to spin that makes it seem like you are on your own after you are given limited time to try on watches, then sent on your way to figure out what and where to place a preorder. This needs to be clarified because it's obvious that even people here are under the impression that they must place orders for watches they may not want in the hopes they'll get one they will want. Lack of clarity gives rise to speculation, which drives irrational behavior.

    Your concern is noted, as is the "irrational behavior."

  • Reply 78 of 170
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    This is exactly the right way to think about it.  During the initial roll-out of a product that has many SKUs, it's smart to manage inventory centrally rather than try to guess how many of each SKU to provide to each Apple store.  And from the roll-out period Apple will see patterns of buying for each SKU and so they will have a large amount of data from which to determine the overall, and per location popularity of each SKU.  This will make the task of supplying stores post-roll-out easily and more accurate.  

    This is totally logical and makes complete sense. I don't get all the knee jerk reactions questioning if Ahrendts "gets" Apple or knows what she's doing,
  • Reply 79 of 170
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    sog35 wrote: »
    So are you telling me someone who OWNS a iPhone and wants to buy a smartwatch does not know how to order product online?

    Are you serious?

    Are you?
  • Reply 80 of 170
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tmay View Post

     

    Unless you have evidence that Apple has ever used this "marketing" technique, I will consider you a "concern" troll for bringing this up. It may be that supplies are always constrained, but it is likely true that Apple would have preferred to have much more stock available for sale from day one. Such is the necessity to "ship in the the first quarter", which Apple has already fudged on.

     

    There were people in the past that stated the very same thing that you are stating, but about the iPhone, and there will certainly be people stating the same about the next new product that Apple launches.

     

    Same as it ever was.

     

    By the way. The problem with selling cars the way Alfa Romeo is selling them (evidently) is that dealers set themselves up for lost sales, even though the "buzz" is great. It might be that some other new car from a manufacturer will get the new "buzz" and steal all your potential sales.




    The take-away here from what we've read is that Angela Ahrendts is working to change the Apple retail experience, in particular, to eliminate the indignity of Apple's most loyal customers having to camp out to buy the newest products. She comes from upscale retail where circus rollouts like we've seen in the past from Apple simply are not done.

     

    I can't speak for Alpha Romeo being a well-run company or not, but in retail not being able to supply the product a customer wants to buy is just plain bad business. It's a lost sale. You don't know if you will ever see that customer again. Every indication is Apple is a well-run company. They want everyone who wants an Apple Watch to be able to buy one.

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