Apple Watch preorders estimated at 2.3M units, low supply blamed on haptic vibrator and OLED display

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 52
    oneaburns wrote: »
    Did you notice any lag when opening apps or were you even able to do that? I ask because one reviewer that wore it a week said it was sometimes slow to respond. Curious to see what others that have used it thought. I'm also assuming there will be lots of software updates by the time it actually reaches people.


    It's sort of running on a loop but you can open apps and use the digital crown and honestly it all seemed very smooth. The one thing I forgot to mention is the screen, it's spectacular, it's so sharp and bright, it's quite something, like I said...it really needs to be seen to believe.
  • Reply 22 of 52
    maccomacco Posts: 1member
    Maybe I am misreading this but your article does not seem to support the headline! The post seems to conflate customer preorders and an estimate of units that may be produced! Two very different things! Why don't you give us MingCho's exact full quote and not your apparent misinterpretation?
  • Reply 23 of 52
    bushman4bushman4 Posts: 861member
    By April 24 (even though the date has been removed from the website) we'll know the story. Apple has to say something to substantiate the wait or decrease the que time
  • Reply 24 of 52
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BUSHMAN4 View Post



    By April 24 (even though the date has been removed from the website) we'll know the story. Apple has to say something to substantiate the wait or decrease the que time



    It seems the Apple Watch launch day has been scrubbed. Apparently they were worried that people would see "launch day" and line up outside the stores and there would be no stock for them.

  • Reply 25 of 52
    Question: Has there ever been an Apple product launch tat was not hampered by xxx supply/production constraints?
    Answer: No

    Question: Have these alleged supply/production constraints ever prevented Apple from setting new sales records?
    Answer: No

    Question: Then why the fsck do these piss ant reports continue?
    Answer: Because people read them, and as long as they continue to do so, "appleinsider" and its kind will continue to print them.

    I place zero value in this, and other reports like this, because they are unprovable, and after earnings report are completely forgotten. My 'reporting' track record could be described as 'accurate' if my 'reports' cannot be proven or disproven.
  • Reply 26 of 52

    The demo watches are not paired to an iPhone

  • Reply 27 of 52
    thedbathedba Posts: 768member
    I place zero value in this, and other reports like this, because they are unprovable, and after earnings report are completely forgotten. My 'reporting' track record could be described as 'accurate' if my 'reports' cannot be proven or disproven.
    Well, this report is far more credible than conspiracy theories being thrown out, like Apple is intentionally limiting production to ramp up demand for the product.
    Besides, you ignored the part of the article that mentioned this analyst (Ming Chi Kuo) has a pretty good track record in predicting this kind of stuff and the reasons why we are having these shortages.
  • Reply 28 of 52
    friedmudfriedmud Posts: 165member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

     

    It is amazing how clueless you are.  You can't even get your own Apple fanboy facts right.  No wonder no one believes the stuff you write.  Apple did 957K pre-orders for the Apple Watch during the launch.  Apple sold one million iPhones in 2 1/2 months, more if you add an extra two weeks for your 3 month example.  How is 957K three-times more than one million?  Did you fail math?  It sure sounds like you did.


     

    And another one for the blocked list....

     

    And to stay on topic: Over 2M is a great number!  I only hope that Apple can ramp up their supply!

  • Reply 29 of 52
    mrboba1mrboba1 Posts: 276member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by foggyhill View Post

     

     

    Hey, BUDDY, these are ALL ESTIMATES pulled from someone's derriere. That you think that 957K (why not 960K) is actually close to an exact number makes me think your looking to push some buttons.




    Because 957K sounds much more precise, therefore it must be correct.

     

    /s

  • Reply 30 of 52
    Your 957,000 number has been discredited. It's from a first time analytics firm, Slice, using dubious methodology. Even if you believe Slice, they said 957,000 PEOPLE preordered an average of 1.3 watches. That's 1.25 million, but the survey was U.S. only. The watch launched in 9 other MAJOR markets, so one can extrapolate that 1.25 million could be doubled. THAT'S why the 957,000 number is not reported on here. (Credit Gruber)
  • Reply 31 of 52
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member

    Kuo is indeed well connected, but is he well connected enough to anticipate supply chain problems for the whole year?

     

    I would think that given 2.3 million pre-orders effectively "sold out" (if you can sell out pre-orders, I mean people gave up) and there are many more release countries to come, those yearly numbers seem low. 

     

    That said he does have good supply chain contacts.

  • Reply 32 of 52
    captain jcaptain j Posts: 313member
    slurpy wrote: »
    If true, there are almost 3X more pre-orders for the Apple Watch than the original iPhone sold during 3 full months after launch. 

    Wow, what a fail.

    /s

    A totally invalid comparison. When the first iPhone launched Apple was a computer company with a line of music players. There was no reason for the masses to assume Apple's iPhone was this great product, which the first iteration was not. Now Apple is known for its wide variety of awesome products and as being the number one innovator in tech. People are MUCH more prone to drool at upcoming Apple products today and pre-order just based on Apple's rep
  • Reply 33 of 52
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    captain j wrote: »
    A totally invalid comparison. When the first iPhone launched Apple was a computer company with a line of music players. There was no reason for the masses to assume Apple's iPhone was this great product, which the first iteration was not. Now Apple is known for its wide variety of awesome products and as being the number one innovator in tech. People are MUCH more prone to drool at upcoming Apple products today and pre-order just based on Apple's rep
    I don't have a beef with the gist of your comment, but I do believe that you and others minimize the public anticipation of the iPhone back in 2007. The iPhone had been the subject of rumor and speculation for months. When Steve Jobs finally introduced it, the public "got it." During the six-month interregnum between the introduction of the iPhone and the day that it went on sale, it became the subject of a pop song. In the US, the iPhone was available primarily through company-owned AT&T Stores. It sold out at most at most stores on Day One.

    Although Apple has more credibility outside traditional personal computers and music players now, it was no slouch in 2007. The real constraint on iPhone distribution was the fact that it was exclusive to a single carrier in most markets. In the US, that was AT&T. It was available only through the carrier's stores and, IIRC, the Apple Store. There was no carrier subsidy meaning that only those who could afford to pay full price could buy it. After I got off work, I found an AT&T Store that still had a few top line iPhones in stock. After forking over about $800, I took one of them home.
  • Reply 34 of 52
    captain jcaptain j Posts: 313member
    mr. me wrote: »
    I don't have a beef with the gist of your comment, but I do believe that you and others minimize the public anticipation of the iPhone back in 2007. The iPhone had been the subject of rumor and speculation for months. When Steve Jobs finally introduced it, the public "got it." During the six-month interregnum between the introduction of the iPhone and day that it went on sale, it became the subject of a pop song. In the US, the iPhone was available primarily through company-owned AT&T Stores. It sold out at most at most stores on Day One.

    Although Apple has more credibility outside traditional personal computers and music players now, it was no slouch in 2007. The real constraint on iPhone distribution was the fact that it was exclusive to a single carrier in most markets. In the US, that was AT&T. It was available only through the carrier's stores and, IIRC, the Apple Store. There was no carrier subsidy meaning that only those who could afford to pay full price could buy it. After I got off work, I found an AT&T Store that still had a few top line iPhones in stock. After forking over about $800, I took one of them home.

    All good and valid points, some of which I'd forgotten. There was also the very high price, rapidly lowered that factored in I'm sure.
  • Reply 35 of 52
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post





    I don't have a beef with the gist of your comment, but I do believe that you and others minimize the public anticipation of the iPhone back in 2007. The iPhone had been the subject of rumor and speculation for months. When Steve Jobs finally introduced it, the public "got it." During the six-month interregnum between the introduction of the iPhone and the day that it went on sale, it became the subject of a pop song. In the US, the iPhone was available primarily through company-owned AT&T Stores. It sold out at most at most stores on Day One.



    Although Apple has more credibility outside traditional personal computers and music players now, it was no slouch in 2007. The real constraint on iPhone distribution was the fact that it was exclusive to a single carrier in most markets. In the US, that was AT&T. It was available only through the carrier's stores and, IIRC, the Apple Store. There was no carrier subsidy meaning that only those who could afford to pay full price could buy it. After I got off work, I found an AT&T Store that still had a few top line iPhones in stock. After forking over about $800, I took one of them home.



    I turned up at launch day in a reasonably sized city in the UK ( this was a few months after the US launch and was the O2 store as there was no Apple store in that city then) to see a crowd of 5 people, count them, also queueing. Including a guy I texted and who also was an Apple fan.

     

    The iPod helped a bit I suppose, but not much. I know Apple haters who admit they bought an iPod shuffle or something, but everybody with an iPhone is an Apple fan ( with the exceptions of people who got them from work, but even there I have seen converts). It's just a lot more personal, a lot more expensive. And then many of these also migrate over time to the Mac.

     

    Your point about distribution is true, but there wasn't that pent up demand. It became quickly a hit, and the 3G saw 100's of people queuing outside the newly opened Apple store in the same city. I wasn't one but I got it a few months later. 

     

    However the general point is correct, we can't compare this release to the first iPhone. Nevertheless it is successful by any standards if the analysis is correct.

  • Reply 36 of 52
    freerangefreerange Posts: 1,597member
    oneaburns wrote: »
    Did you notice any lag when opening apps or were you even able to do that? I ask because one reviewer that wore it a week said it was sometimes slow to respond. Curious to see what others that have used it thought. I'm also assuming there will be lots of software updates by the time it actually reaches people.

    I experienced no lag and found it very responsive. I also tried the new MacBook and also found it extremely responsive. Apps, including iMovie opened in 3 seconds or less. The reviews saying under powered are total BS. It has plenty of horsepower!
  • Reply 37 of 52
    brlawyerbrlawyer Posts: 828member

    Pretty underwhelming number - seems like the "adrenaline rush" moment will not go too far.

  • Reply 38 of 52
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post

     

    Pretty underwhelming number - seems like the "adrenaline rush" moment will not go too far.


    You're back with your usual pap... groan.... I thought your a** was banned?

  • Reply 39 of 52
    brlawyerbrlawyer Posts: 828member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

     

    You're back with your usual pap... groan.... I thought your a** was banned?




    Just because I am not warm on the AW? Get a grip, please.

  • Reply 40 of 52
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    asdasd wrote: »

    I turned up at launch day in a reasonably sized city in the UK ( this was a few months after the US launch and was the O2 store as there was no Apple store in that city then) to see a crowd of 5 people, count them, also queueing. Including a guy I texted and who also was an Apple fan.

    ...
    Oh please. :rolleyes:

    To claim that there was no pent-up demand because you did not see it is just silly. There was very much pent-up demand and the things that accompany pent-up demand in the US on the day that the iPhone launched. Among the things that accompany pent-up demand were long queues, police guards and barricades, and refreshments supplied by the retailer.
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