Apple intervenes in Radio Shack sale in effort to protect customer data

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 75
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,380member
    blazar wrote: »
    Radio shack end of an era...

    Those little gadgets, resistors, transistors, and circuit boards fascinated me and led to projects when I was a kid. The iphone generation is left with no actual knowledge about how anything works. There is no local outlet or expertise to mentor little kids into tech careers. 99% of everything taught in public or private schools didn't cover what you would learn with a decent electronics kit from radio shack.
    I hated to see them go from own city. We had 3 different stores within a short drive. They were the only place to find some of the specialty electronics components, especially for those of us that weren't entirely certain what they were looking for and needed hands-on assistance. On-line ordering is not always a viable replacement for a brick-and-mortar.
  • Reply 22 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    sog35 wrote: »
    No its called anti-trolling.

    Why would you expect Apple fans to feel 'trolled' when someone brings up the sins of Google?  Only a Google fan would feel 'trolled'.

    If this was an Android site then yes it would be trolling.  when in Rome.

    Eloquently explained.
  • Reply 23 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    sog35 wrote: »
    Rent is expensive.
    Labor is expensive.
    Utilities are expensive.

    If it was so easy to 'break even' with Radio shack they would have never gone out of business.

    With all those stores and fixed costs Radio shack needs to push a ton of revenue just to 'break even'.

    Its called progress.  People can easily get parts online from Amazon and get tutorials on Youtube. 

    Sad but true. It makes me think of the model shop in my home town that as a small boy I spent so many of my waking hours looking in the window. It was a small shop with wooden steps and a large glass door covered in tantalizing packets hanging on the inside. I'd watch people come and go and hear the bell chime and the floor boards creak as they entered, the door closing behind them. Me, with no money just gazed in the window longingly. All those boxes of balsa wood and plastic model ships, airplanes and so on plus the squirrel hair brushes in jars, the small tins of paints, the varnishes the transfers. Once or twice a year with money from a birthday or Christmas I'd get to open the creaky door and smell the inside. Oh it was wondrous.
  • Reply 24 of 75
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    And that, my friends, is why it's so important to use Apple Pay or cash only at retail establishments.

    How true! I make it a point to avoid using my credit card whenever possible. I also decline any sort of loyalty card or other tracking mechanism that company's employ.

    It is interesting that the government is trying to force people to give up cash. The obvious thing here is that cash I sn't trackable like credit transactions. A move to a cashless society would come with a move to suppress personal freedom.
  • Reply 25 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    wizard69 wrote: »
    How true! I make it a point to avoid using my credit card whenever possible. I also decline any sort of loyalty card or other tracking mechanism that company's employ.

    It is interesting that the government is trying to force people to give up cash. The obvious thing here is that cash I sn't trackable like credit transactions. A move to a cashless society would come with a move to suppress personal freedom.

    I agree mostly although I am not sure about being forced to give up cash. Not that I use it much and couldn't really care one way or the other, but can you elaborate on a deliberate, forced effort to remove cash from the system by our Government? I'd find that interesting to say the least.
  • Reply 26 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    I hated to see them go from own city. We had 3 different stores within a short drive. They were the only place to find some of the specialty electronics components, especially for those of us that weren't entirely certain what they were looking for and needed hands-on assistance. On-line ordering is not always a viable replacement for a brick-and-mortar.

    Ah a post I can enjoy and appreciate. Thank you. And I agree it is terribly sad to see small shops go, progress has its costs for sure. We older members experienced something younger generations can't even imagine. Heck I remember in the early 50's visiting my dad's grandparents post office in North Wales and seeing the brass scales for determining the postage for letters in use. I have them now on our mantlepiece. They also sold sweets (home made toffee) and papers and magazines. My first ever Batman comic came from there and I can still recall the damn story! I can't remember what I did yesterday however! LOL
  • Reply 27 of 75
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Sad but true. It makes me think of the model shop in my home town that as a small boy I spent so many of my waking hours looking in the window.
    For the most part hobby shops are doing OK. Somethings aren't shop able by remote control, you need the hands on and maybe the input of a store owner.
    It was a small shop with wooden steps and a large glass door covered in tantalizing packets hanging on the inside. I'd watch people come and go and hear the bell chime and the floor boards creak as they entered, the door closing behind them. Me, with no money just gazed in the window longingly. All those boxes of balsa wood and plastic model ships, airplanes and so on plus the squirrel hair brushes in jars, the small tins of paints, the varnishes the transfers. Once or twice a year with money from a birthday or Christmas I'd get to open the creaky door and smell the inside. Oh it was wondrous.

    What is funny here is that I've often considered going into business for myself by opening up such a shop. The major problem is the lack of funds, I actually took a couple of small business classes and it was more discouraging than you might imagine.

    As for Radio Shack they really lost it when they turned to high volume low quality products. Sad really considering they had some industry leading products in the past. Of course a store like the shack needs to have a mix of products some to generate cash flow but they seemed to have totally given up on selling better quality equipment.
  • Reply 28 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    wizard69 wrote: »
    For the most part hobby shops are doing OK. Somethings aren't shop able by remote control, you need the hands on and maybe the input of a store owner.
    What is funny here is that I've often considered going into business for myself by opening up such a shop. The major problem is the lack of funds, I actually took a couple of small business classes and it was more discouraging than you might imagine.

    As for Radio Shack they really lost it when they turned to high volume low quality products. Sad really considering they had some industry leading products in the past. Of course a store like the shack needs to have a mix of products some to generate cash flow but they seemed to have totally given up on selling better quality equipment.

    I think the modern kids would love such a shop (now I think about it, Harry Potter's Diagon Alley was pretty spot on lol). The large stores such as Michael's lack any staff with a clue and sell too wide of a selection. I am sure crafts will make a come back (as opposed to electronic toys) as people realize there is a reason crafts have been around for millennia.
  • Reply 29 of 75
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,740member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    And that, my friends, is why it's so important to use Apple Pay or cash only at retail establishments.

     

    Yes, but you need a give out a lot more than just a form of payment to get a cell phone activated.

  • Reply 30 of 75
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

     

    IMO, Ads are the scourge of modern day.


    It's called capitalism. Marketing is essential selling anything. If you are offended by ads, don't go on the internet, don't leave your home, don't view your email inbox, don't watch TV or look in your mail box. Ads are what keeps businesses working. Learn to deal with it.

     

    The real scourges of the modern day are things like gangs, graffiti, terrorists, drugs, sexual predators, and dictators, etc. not advertising.

  • Reply 31 of 75
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    I agree mostly although I am not sure about being forced to give up cash. Not that I use it much and couldn't really care one way or the other, but can you elaborate on a deliberate, forced effort to remove cash from the system by our Government? I'd find that interesting to say the least.

    In many jurisdictions if you carry large quantities of cash, you are considered a criminal and will have that cash confiscated without legal justification. There are many examples of this happening to people and lately has been getting more attention in the press. Then we have the IRS seizing the assets of business that have to many cash transactions. Further the government has been trying to get the banks to flag cash withdrawals over $5000. This use to be $10,000.

    If you spend some time looking there is considerable effort afoot to make cash criminal.
  • Reply 32 of 75
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    mstone wrote: »
    It's called capitalism. Marketing is essential selling anything. If you are offended by ads, don't go on the internet, don't leave your home, don't view your email inbox, don't watch TV or look in your mail box. Ads are what keeps businesses working. Learn to deal with it.

    The real scourges of the modern day are things like gangs, graffiti, terrorists, drugs, sexual predators, and dictators, etc. not advertising.

    The "gangs" and "drugs" part of that list could be largely eradicated with decriminalization (gangs rely on scarcity, which leads to artificially high prices created by those laws declaring certain drugs illegal).
  • Reply 33 of 75
    argonautargonaut Posts: 126member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    -snip-

     

    The real scourges of the modern day are things like gangs, graffiti, terrorists, drugs, sexual predators, and dictators, etc. not advertising.


     

    I think you'll find all those things have been around for millennia... they are not a modern day phenomenon.

  • Reply 34 of 75
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    I think the modern kids would love such a shop (now I think about it, Harry Potter's Diagon Alley was pretty spot on lol). The large stores such as Michael's lack any staff with a clue and sell too wide of a selection. I am sure crafts will make a come back (as opposed to electronic toys) as people realize there is a reason crafts have been around for millennia.

    Locally there are a number of independent hobby shops that seem to be successful. I don't know the owners but the places haven't been shuttered yet. That is a positive because the Obama ecomomy has closed up more than a few businesses here.

    It is sort of like Music stores oriented to selling instruments. You really can't do that online well.
  • Reply 35 of 75
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post





    The "gangs" and "drugs" part of that list could be largely eradicated with decriminalization (gangs rely on scarcity, which leads to artificially high prices created by those laws declaring certain drugs illegal).



    BS. Gangs do a lot more criminal activity than selling drugs. They steal and kill. They even traffic in human body parts. The Mafia is not going out of business if you make pot, heroin and cocaine legal. That is the stupidest idea ever.

  • Reply 36 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    The "gangs" and "drugs" part of that list could be largely eradicated with decriminalization (gangs rely on scarcity, which leads to artificially high prices created by those laws declaring certain drugs illegal).

    Hear hear.
  • Reply 37 of 75
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    mstone wrote: »

    BS. Gangs do a lot more criminal activity than selling drugs. They steal and kill. They even traffic in human body parts. The Mafia is not going out of business if you make pot, heroin and cocaine legal. That is the stupidest idea ever.

    Gangs serve business ends. It's all about supply and demand. There is a massive and highly profitable business trafficking drugs. The demand for drugs stays relatively consistent regardless of whether or not they are illegal.

    Legalization and/or decriminalization would save billions of dollars wasted on enforcement and incarceration: http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/Economics#sthash.QgQHtZSb.dpbs
  • Reply 38 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    mstone wrote: »

    BS. Gangs do a lot more criminal activity than selling drugs. They steal and kill. They even traffic in human body parts. The Mafia is not going out of business if you make pot, heroin and cocaine legal. That is the stupidest idea ever.

    Citing extreme examples doesn't change the facts. The vast majority of middle to low level crime in drug related cases would be removed at least. Heck i used to buy Codine in Boots the Chemists for a headache, now people get arrested for selling it. Of course the Mafia types would find something else.
  • Reply 39 of 75
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    Citing extreme examples doesn't change the facts. The vast majority of middle to low level crime in drug related cases would be removed at least. Heck i used to buy Codine in Boots the Chemists for a headache, now people get arrested for selling it. Of course the Mafia types would find something else.



    People who use drugs are stupid. If you make it legal, instead of hiding it, they will just leave it lying around the house where pets and children will get into it. This is already being reported in states that have legalized pot.

  • Reply 40 of 75
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,483member
    wizard69 wrote: »
    In many jurisdictions if you carry large quantities of cash, you are considered a criminal and will have that cash confiscated without legal justification. There are many examples of this happening to people and lately has been getting more attention in the press. Then we have the IRS seizing the assets of business that have to many cash transactions. Further the government has been trying to get the banks to flag cash withdrawals over $5000. This use to be $10,000.

    If you spend some time looking there is considerable effort afoot to make cash criminal.

    Just to pick up on one point, if you deposit or withdraw >$10,000 now it is true it is flagged, but that can be via check or wire transfer, it need not be cash per se, surely?
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