Wanting for real estate, Apple may undertake 'major expansion' in San Jose - report

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2015
With a rapidly-expanding workforce and a shortage of options in the city of Cupertino, Calif., Apple is reportedly considering a "major expansion" of its corporate office and research and development facilities to neighboring San Jose.


Even the addition of Apple's new "spaceship" campus will not meet the space requirements of the company's workforce.


Apple is currently considering two sites in San Jose and could be looking for as much as 1.5 million square feet of space, according to the Silicon Valley Business Journal. Apple already has a modest presence in the city, with a relatively small office adjacent to the headquarters of Hewlett-Packard spinoff Agilent.

Among the locations said to be under consideration are 101 Tech --?part of which previously served as the corporate headquarters for seminal semiconductor firm Atmel --?and Coleman Highline, a major mixed-use development adjacent to the San Jose Earthquakes' new soccer stadium.





A move into San Jose could make sense for Apple, as more than one fourth of its workforce currently lives in the city. Late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs considered a San Jose campus in the 1980s, but Jobs was forced out before that project was realized.

Such a move could also be beneficial for San Jose as a whole, as some believe that Apple has the power to act as somewhat of an anchor tenant that would attract other firms.

"If the office and R&D developers are following Apple, or trying to guess where Apple's going to go in a meaningful way, that could have an effect," Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone told the publication.

"There are suppliers and vendors that will want to gravitate toward companies like an Apple," he added.





Apple is deep into the construction of a new, 2.8-million square foot campus in Cupertino, but that facility is only designed to house 13,000 employees. The company also occupies dozens of other buildings in Cupertino --?where it has vacuumed up as much as 60 percent of the commercial real estate, according to some estimates --?Sunnyvale, and Santa Clara.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 37
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,383member
    Tim, too many eggs in the earthquake potential basket IMHO. Expand in Florida instead and have endless sunshine for those new solar arrays you could build. Perhaps you could lean on our current Governor while you're at it and get solar policy fixed here.
  • Reply 2 of 37
    Quote:


    Hewlett-Packard spinoff Agilent


    I know that's technically correct, but the real Hewlett-Packard IS Agilent.

  • Reply 3 of 37
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,383member
    I know that's technically correct, but the real Hewlett-Packard IS Agilent.

    Well at least they don't have the stigma of having turned the Apple 1 down five times on their record now, having split off! :D
  • Reply 4 of 37
    macinthe408macinthe408 Posts: 1,050member
    Two things:
    - Way too much desk space in those interior shots! Cut that elbow room in half.
    - Why did they have to simulate a basketball game? Oh wait, everyone at Apple works through lunch.
  • Reply 5 of 37
    konqerrorkonqerror Posts: 685member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     

    I know that's technically correct, but the real Hewlett-Packard IS Agilent.


     

    Actually it's now Keysight.

  • Reply 6 of 37
    fred1fred1 Posts: 833member
    Based solely on the videos, I vote for the Coleman bldg. the first video is the very basic, uninspired stuff that architects (like me) produce.
    Plus, with the Coleman building you save the hassles of leading to a good provider by having a food truck come each day!
  • Reply 7 of 37
    formosaformosa Posts: 261member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

     

     

    Actually it's now Keysight.




    I was about to make the same comment. At least "Keysight" rolls off the tongue easier than Agilent (at least for me). Still, nothing beats the cachet of "Hewlett-Packard" on (expensive) test equipment.

  • Reply 8 of 37
    inklinginkling Posts: 731member
    Given California's dreadful political system, Apple would be well-advised to shift its staff, including developers, to other high-tech centers, including Raleigh, Huntsville, and Austin.

    It's not just that California 'ain't got no water' and didn't prepare for this drought. Its highways and public schools are among the worst in the country due to dreadful special interest politics and crony politics. Some of the country's worst rich/poor gaps don't help either.

    Think Detroit or Baltimore and you'll get an idea where it's headed.
  • Reply 9 of 37
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,446member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post



    Tim, too many eggs in the earthquake potential basket IMHO. Expand in Florida instead and have endless sunshine for those new solar arrays you could build. Perhaps you could lean on our current Governor while you're at it and get solar policy fixed here.



    The south bay doesn't quite shake as much during an earthquake as you might expect. When we lived in San Jose during the 89' quake, not so much as a plate fell over. That epicenter was just southwest of San Jose in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Most damage is from shoddy construction and structures built on much less stable landfill.

     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post



    Think Detroit or Baltimore and you'll get an idea where it's headed.


     

    Give me a break... The whole of California is not going to end up like Detroit or Baltimore! LOL  Neither will the SF Bay Area - it has survived through the growth and death of many industries, it'll continue to survive regardless of what happens.

  • Reply 10 of 37
    schlackschlack Posts: 708member
    why didn't they plan out their spaceship to hold more than 13K employees? wonder if jobs imagined that only the select few would operation out of the spaceship while having other employees scattered around the area in normal office buildings.
  • Reply 11 of 37
    macinthe408macinthe408 Posts: 1,050member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post

    Its highways and public schools are among the worst in the country due to dreadful special interest politics and crony politics. Some of the country's worst rich/poor gaps don't help either.

     

    You can thank Proposition 13 for that. It's the third-rail of California politics. Fortunately, it's sunsetting soon--the people that benefitted mostly from it are going to die off.

     

    It allowed the old-timers to "upgrade" their homes and take their previous property taxes with them. To put it simply, Old Man Herman would pay $1,000 per year, New Family Jones would pay $50,000 per year in the house next door, yet same services provided to both. However, Herman doesn't have kids to put through local school system, so he could care less about changing Prop 13's benefits (to him). 

     

    On the other hand, neighborhoods with low-property values (read: the ghetto) have crap schools, as you mention. The richie rich's love it, the poor people don't, and guess who wins in that battle.

  • Reply 12 of 37
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Apple is deep into the construction of a new, 2.8-million square foot campus in Cupertino, but that facility is only designed to house 13,000 employees. The company also occupies dozens of other buildings in Cupertino --?where it has vacuumed up as much as 60 percent of the commercial real estate, according to some estimates --?Sunnyvale, and Santa Clara.

     

    I'll keep saying it...Apple should design a scaled down version of the main spaceship campus and then standardize on that design for the construction of all future regional offices.  The design of the main campus is going to be iconic and having many of their offices share that design will add to the brand.

  • Reply 13 of 37
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,526member
    I'll keep saying it...Apple should design a scaled down version of the main spaceship campus and then standardize on that design for the construction of all future regional offices.  The design of the main campus is going to be iconic and having many of their offices share that design will add to the brand.

    This may be a good idea, but wouldn't they want to see how the low-rise torus works in practice first? For a year or so anyway? Also, it may need the orchard and savannah space surrounding to make sense as a glass house. So big sites would be required, if true.

    Otherwise, I think the possibility that the building is another iconic product of theirs is very real, as you say.
  • Reply 14 of 37
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    Tim, too many eggs in the earthquake potential basket IMHO. Expand in Florida instead and have endless sunshine for those new solar arrays you could build. Perhaps you could lean on our current Governor while you're at it and get solar policy fixed here.

    Too many electrical storms. :lol:
  • Reply 15 of 37
    pscooter63pscooter63 Posts: 1,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post



    Given California's dreadful...

     

    Find a new schtick, please.

  • Reply 16 of 37
    calicali Posts: 3,494member
    Apple is growing faster than it can build it seems. By the time Spaceship is done it will be obsolete.Nice!
    schlack wrote: »
    why didn't they plan out their spaceship to hold more than 13K employees? wonder if jobs imagined that only the select few would operation out of the spaceship while having other employees scattered around the area in normal office buildings.

    Read above.

    Apple is expanding much faster than Steve imagined back in 2009.
  • Reply 17 of 37
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post



    Given California's dreadful political system, Apple would be well-advised to shift its staff, including developers, to other high-tech centers, including Raleigh, Huntsville, and Austin.



    It's not just that California 'ain't got no water' and didn't prepare for this drought. Its highways and public schools are among the worst in the country due to dreadful special interest politics and crony politics. Some of the country's worst rich/poor gaps don't help either.



    Think Detroit or Baltimore and you'll get an idea where it's headed.



    California has plenty of water, just not enough for hamburger, almonds or cotton industrial agriculture until the snow/rains return.

  • Reply 18 of 37
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,034member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post



    Tim, too many eggs in the earthquake potential basket IMHO. Expand in Florida instead and have endless sunshine for those new solar arrays you could build. Perhaps you could lean on our current Governor while you're at it and get solar policy fixed here.

    Where the hell Apple can find technical people in Florida? This is why Silicon Valley rules the States: available technical workers.

  • Reply 19 of 37
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,034member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post



    Two things:

    - Way too much desk space in those interior shots! Cut that elbow room in half.

    - Why did they have to simulate a basketball game? Oh wait, everyone at Apple works through lunch.

    Apple works through weekends too. My friends's average hours at Apple is 10-12 hrs/day

  • Reply 20 of 37
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,034member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Too many electrical storms. image

    and welfare immigrant...lol...

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