Google adding fingerprint support to 'Android M' - report

Posted:
in iPhone edited June 2015
The next version of Google's Android mobile operating system will reportedly bring system-wide support for fingerprint authentication, paving the way for more Android devices to adopt Touch ID-style biometrics.

Motorola planned a fingerprint sensor for the dimple that houses the Motorola logo on the back of the Nexus 6.Motorola planned a fingerprint sensor for the dimple that houses the Motorola logo on the back of the Nexus 6.


Google's fingerprint solution will allow users to both unlock their phone and replace passwords in supported applications, according to BuzzFeed News. Support could be announced as early as next week, when Google convenes its annual developers conference, though there is still no confirmation that "Android M" will be on the docket.

Android OEMs that already offer fingerprint sensors in their devices --?such as Samsung and China's Huawei --?have been forced to roll their own biometric authentication systems. Adding it to the Android core would ease the burden on smaller manufacturers, and could also help to drive adoption by allowing developers to quickly integrate with fingerprint sensors.

On iOS, developers quickly added Touch ID as an authentication option after Apple opened the system up to third parties. Some in the iOS development community have observed that apps which feature Touch ID support sell better than comparable offerings without it, suggesting that consumers have warmed to the functionality.

Earlier this year, former Motorola chief Dennis Woodside revealed that Google's Nexus 6 was originally designed with fingerprint authentication in mind, but the feature was scrapped after Apple bought sensor supplier AuthenTec.

"The secret behind that is that it was supposed to be fingerprint recognition, and Apple bought the best supplier," Woodside said, referring to a dimple on the handset's rear that now contains the Motorola logo. "So the second best supplier was the only one available to everyone else in the industry and they weren't there yet."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64

    seems like google is saying I rather you use this working fingerprint software than some half-baked software. (samsung)

  • Reply 2 of 64
    matrix07matrix07 Posts: 1,993member
    Welcome to 2013, Google.

    Oh, and what about Android face detection?

    Btw, I just saw my friend unlocking his Galaxy S5 last month and boy... I only saw it one time and I immediately knew his password from the way he dragged his finger across the screen (it couldn't be dragged too fast and the shape was more outstanding than the digit)
  • Reply 3 of 64

    Hmmm.

     

    Google publishes the source code for Android so OEMs can take it and get it working on their devices.

     

    I wonder how many people are going to start looking at the source for fingerprint scanning to look for ways to capture users prints? Unless Google puts this in Google Play Services (which means OEMs using AOSP won't get this feature).

  • Reply 4 of 64
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    matrix07 wrote: »
    Welcome to 2013, Google.

    Oh, and what about Android face detection?

    Btw, I just saw my friend unlocking his Galaxy S5 last month and boy... I only saw it one time and I immediately knew his password from the way he dragged his finger across the screen (it couldn't be dragged too fast and the shape was more outstanding than the digit)

    It can be set it so that the shape is never visible.
  • Reply 5 of 64
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Sure, Google can finally add OS support. That doesn't mean each HARDWARE company will be on board, and it doesn't mean each developer's APP will be on board.

    Why support TouchID in an iOS app? Because a vast number of users--converging on 100%--have it. Can't say the same for Android.

    Hardware and software glommed together from multiple different parties is not a problem with a solution.

    Meanwhile, I just read about erased Android devices--even newer ones with encryption--allowing future owners to retrieve the data: GMail access, photos, you name it:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-32844310

    A problem Google knew about years ago, tried to fix and failed... not that it matters, because most Android users never see the newer versions of the OS. Their hardware is abandoned by the handset maker before they've even paid off their 2 year contract.
  • Reply 6 of 64
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,833member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

     

    Hmmm.

     

    Google publishes the source code for Android so OEMs can take it and get it working on their devices.

     

    I wonder how many people are going to start looking at the source for fingerprint scanning to look for ways to capture users prints? Unless Google puts this in Google Play Services (which means OEMs using AOSP won't get this feature).




    Yup, that's a good point. Will this be another "closed" API in their "open" operating system? I'm not sure how they can guarantee security if access to the code is broad.

  • Reply 7 of 64
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,895member

    The "new" technology will be called SuckID. Google's innovation in this space will be to suck your fingerprints into the cloud.

  • Reply 8 of 64
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    I would rather Google fix whatever gmail password update problem is preventing everyone who changed passwords at my university in the last month from accessing their email. I warned the school entrusting data and infrastructure to the scum at Google would cost them. Now, just in time for grades dozens of professors are locked out of the schools primary communication method. Smooth work Google. Smooth.
  • Reply 9 of 64
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member

    Makes sense, security for mobile devices keeps rising in profile as more and more financial things take place through them.

  • Reply 10 of 64
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    "It'll never fly, Orville!"

    "Hey, got room for one more?"
  • Reply 11 of 64
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    jfc1138 wrote: »
    Makes sense, security for mobile devices keeps rising in profile as more and more companies copy Apple.

    fixed it for you!
  • Reply 12 of 64
    john12345john12345 Posts: 152member
    Welcome to 2013, Android.
  • Reply 13 of 64
    elmoofoelmoofo Posts: 100member
    Very innovative.
  • Reply 14 of 64
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member

    Why is it again Android users say Apple never innovates and exclude things like this?

  • Reply 15 of 64
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,225member

    Wow. What a surprise.

     

    A bunch of third-rate copyists, not all that different from Samsung....

  • Reply 16 of 64
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    john12345 wrote: »
    Welcome to 2013, Android.

    Fingerprint scanners on smartphones existed before 2013.
  • Reply 17 of 64
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member

    I wonder if Apple is filling for patent continuations on their fingerprint-reader-for-a-phone IP to try to cover every angle and shut out knock-off competitors?

  • Reply 18 of 64
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member

    I wonder if Google will make this flexible enough to incorporate alternative biometrics.  Fujitsu just launched a phone through NTT DoCoMo, the Arrows NX F-04G, which uses Iris recognition to unlock it and to authorise payments.http://www.computerworld.com/article/2921389/mobile-wireless/ntt-docomo-launches-smartphone-with-iris-unlock-feature.html

     

    Samsung filed a patent for an Iris recognition system but hasn't incorporated such a feature in any phone to date.

  • Reply 19 of 64
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Fingerprint scanners on smartphones existed before 2013.

    not ones that, you know, worked.
  • Reply 20 of 64
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    nolamacguy wrote: »
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Fingerprint scanners on smartphones existed before 2013.

    not ones that, you know, worked.

    Doesn't matter. Apple didn't come up with the idea, nor the tech. They purchased it.
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