Study: Device users more responsive to Android app notifications than iOS

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 42
    alfiejralfiejr Posts: 1,524member

    amazing no one has pointed out the obvious reasons for this pattern - in Android the notifications are literally in your face constantly. they stick on the home screen and can't easily be managed - turned off app by app - individually. many do not offer an opt-in/out choice at installation either. so yes of course they will get a much higher response rate as a result of that agressiveness.

     

    manipulating the user to somehow monetize everything is a basic premise of Android.

  • Reply 22 of 42
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,088member
    alfiejr wrote: »
    amazing no one has pointed out the obvious reasons for this pattern - in Android the notifications are literally in your face constantly. they stick on the home screen and can't easily be managed - turned off app by app - individually. many do not offer an opt-in/out choice at installation either.
    You're mistaken. If you have an Android device and want to change the notification settings here's a how-to.

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/how-to-deal-with-android-notification-spam/

    You're probably thinking about very old Android versions, comprising maybe 10% of the devices in use. Yeah those real old ones didn't have an easy way of changing notifications. They were pretty much at the mercy of the app developer.

    EDIT: Huh. Apparently AppOps is now an official part of Android. Allow or deny various permissions on a per-app basis.
  • Reply 23 of 42
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 2,217member
    malta wrote: »
    Completely made up story to help reinforce a point of view.

    1. Can rearrange and organize apps on home screens anyway the user wants making it easier to find apps.
    2. There is the app draw that list all apps in alphabetical order. Can't find it there? You might need to go back to school.
    3. App history list showing all the apps most recently used. 

    So try again.

    Completely *not* made up story. Everything else you said is true, but the complexity of using and modifying the Home screen on Android seems to surpass the skill level of many users, whereas I've seen people with an equivalent comfort level using iOS without any difficulties.

    I don't need to defend iOS over Android. It does that on it's own.
  • Reply 24 of 42
    libdemlibdem Posts: 36member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post





    Completely *not* made up story. Everything else you said is true, but the complexity of using and modifying the Home screen on Android seems to surpass the skill level of many users, whereas I've seen people with an equivalent comfort level using iOS without any difficulties.



    I don't need to defend iOS over Android. It does that on it's own.



    It is people like "collector" above who give the iOS/OSX community a bad name.You are entitled to your opinion but at least make a coherent argument.

  • Reply 25 of 42
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post





    Probably. 98% of the time I deny the request to send notifications as well.

    Ditto - app developers seem to include that functionality to add "stickiness" - only have notifications switched on a couple of apps, including AI's

  • Reply 26 of 42
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,697member
    I suspect this report says there is something ... shall we say ... a wee bit strange about Android users than it does about anything amiss with iOS and / or its users. I agree with many here, I have only notifications set on for a very few things and even them I have Do Not Disturb override from 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. AAPL is the top of my 'On' list :)
  • Reply 27 of 42
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member

    This survey is very useful.  It is true.  Android users like to pay less for cheaper phones.  The iPhone makes the most profit of smartphone makers. The facts mean Android users are skewed to lower wage earners.  For low wage earners they tend to solicit help more to solve their needs.  OTOH, for high wage earners they are more personal achievers.  They rely less on helps.  

  • Reply 28 of 42
    65c81665c816 Posts: 136member
    I see it differently. I find the notifications more useful, and hence, require less interaction. From a user's perspective, I know what's going on, and I get to interact when I want to, with the app.

    From a marketeer's perspective, it's obviously different - they are looking for interaction metrics, and boo hoo hoo. I could give a rats ass about it.
  • Reply 29 of 42
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,088member
    65c816 wrote: »
    I see it differently. I find the notifications more useful, and hence, require less interaction. From a user's perspective, I know what's going on, and I get to interact when I want to, with the app.

    From a marketeer's perspective, it's obviously different - they are looking for interaction metrics, and boo hoo hoo. I could give a rats ass about it.
    That might be true. Perhaps Android notifications are more helpful or better integrated than the way Apple is currently using them and thus looked at more often. Both platforms build on and add to notification features regularly tho Android has more experience with them on mobile.

    http://www.phonearena.com/news/Notification-center-comparison-Android-vs-iPhone-vs-Windows-Phone-vs-BlackBerry-pick-the-best-one_id65643
  • Reply 30 of 42
    65c81665c816 Posts: 136member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post





    That might be true. Perhaps Android notifications are more helpful or better integrated than the way Apple is currently using them and thus looked at more often. Both platforms build on and add to notification features regularly tho Android has more experience with them on mobile.



    http://www.phonearena.com/news/Notification-center-comparison-Android-vs-iPhone-vs-Windows-Phone-vs-BlackBerry-pick-the-best-one_id65643



    Doubt that it's "better".  Useful does not mean "looked at more often".

  • Reply 31 of 42
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,088member
    65c816 wrote: »

    Doubt that it's "better".  Useful does not mean "looked at more often".
    "Better" is in the eyes of the user. Stock Android seems to get good feedback. Are you familiar with how it differs from iOS? The link I provided will at least give you a visual comparison.
  • Reply 32 of 42
    geekmeegeekmee Posts: 629member
    Maybe Android users don't know... Notifications can be turned off??... The most common reply I have experienced with Android users is..."How do I do that?"
  • Reply 33 of 42
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,088member
    geekmee wrote: »
    Maybe Android users don't know... Notifications can be turned off??... The most common reply I have experienced with Android users is..."How do I do that?"

    Simply search "how to turn off Android notifications" like I did. Weird that folks think it's a near-unsolvable task to find out. Never heard of Duck Duck Go? ;)
  • Reply 34 of 42
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    geekmee wrote: »
    Maybe Android users don't know... Notifications can be turned off??... The most common reply I have experienced with Android users is..."How do I do that?"

    And you've never gotten that with iPhone? I remember when people don't even know how to turn off their iPhones.
  • Reply 35 of 42
    neutrino23neutrino23 Posts: 1,561member

    What do they mean by engage? Do you have to visit the app that sent the notification? 

     

    I rarely get notifications. If I'm traveling I have it set so that I receive notifications from United about gate changes or flight delays. I read these on the lock screen then ignore them. The same goes for most other notifications I get. I rarely swipe to visit the app that sent them. How would they measure that as engagement?

  • Reply 36 of 42
    tenlytenly Posts: 710member
    A number of people claim to have turned off most of their notifications and left enabled only the ones that are important to them. A user like this may only get 5 notifications per day and respond to all 5 of them - 100% -because they have effectively pre-ignored all of the others.

    Another user on the same platform, with the same values, education, income, etc... may not have taken the time to disable/pre-ignore the notifications from all of the unimportant apps. A user like this may receive 100 notifications in a day and only respond to the same 5 notifications that the first user responded to. For this user, the engagement rate would only be 5%.

    2 groups of people with similar usage patterns and wildly different engagement percentages.

    Because this survey is based on the % of notifications responded to...it's completely useless.

    To make any attempt at drawing any meaningful conclusions about engagement by platform, they should focus on notifications from a single application - such as "The New York Times" and compare the data collected for notifications sent from that one specific common app.
  • Reply 37 of 42
    dmaxwelldmaxwell Posts: 4member
    This mirrors my experience. I review all the notifications on my Android phone, but on my iPad I just let the notification sit there. Also due to the fact that it takes too much time to clear notifications on iOS.
  • Reply 38 of 42
    just_mejust_me Posts: 590member
    Like YouTube and Facebook
    slurpy wrote: »
    The reason for this is obvious. There is a higher percentage of Android using neckbeard dorks, who obviously do very little with their time, have no social life, and thus excitedly address every push notification as soon as they get it. Meanwhile, iPhone users are actually doing shit, so ignore or take longer to respond to stuff.
  • Reply 39 of 42
    scythe42scythe42 Posts: 28member

    Mirrors my experience. On Android you review notifications and dismiss them to clean them up, because this is how it basically works.

     

    On the IOS you take a look at them in the locked state of the phone and ignore them as they don't stay there. They go away when you unlock anyway. And I never clean notifications on IOS because there is no need at all to do so. 

     

    Difference: Android wants to you review notifications and actively clean them, meaning you pay more attention to them as you are forced to interact longer with them. On IOS, you take a glance and usually don't care. 

     

    Beside that: any app that sends you too much notifications in general is turned off in the long run as you check. Same on IOS and on Android here. Games are usually the ones never getting a chance to send you notifications right away after the send you the first one.

     

    The only story here is: Android users actively clean up notifications because the OS wants them to. This is not being "responsive" to advertisment. Android users don't care about most of them in the same manner as IOS users. It just became a habit to actively dismiss them.

     

    The so called "study" is just a marketing blog post for a professional notification pushers to sell his service more on Android because they want to increase sales there.  

     

    And I am sure they find enough tools who now think now they need to be on Android as well to sell more stuff, which isn't happening.

  • Reply 40 of 42
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Just to clarify based on real data...

    60% of 2 push notifications is not the same as 60% of 2000 push notifications.

    If you're going to compare Android and iOS in any way, you can't ignore real usage data. iOS is being used by real people every day. Android devices sit on shelves and in drawers.
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