Apple Pay launches in UK with 250K stores, 8 banks participating

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  • Reply 41 of 53



    Working for me in London. Both with my iPhone 6 and Apple Watch.

  • Reply 42 of 53
    frantisekfrantisek Posts: 400member
    Quote:

    The current limit in the UK is that transactions under 20 pounds require no verification but that limit will be raised to 30 pounds soon. CDCVM tells the terminal that the phone verified the user through Touch ID, so it qualifies as a verified transaction.

     

    The problem with Europe and the rest of world's PIN system is that the card itself verifies the PIN internally. This can't happen on a contactless transaction since the card is removed before the PIN is entered.

     

    In the US, transactions above $50 are verified by a signature, so it doesn't affect contactless.


     

    In our little country, there are most of terminals contactless already and you probably find store that do not accept cards at all then one not supporting contactless payments as most credit cards are contactless here now.

     

    But because we are tiny I do not expect Apple will hurry to support Apple pay here :-( even it could right now.

  • Reply 43 of 53
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member

    Just tried it in Waitrose. Worked perfectly. 

  • Reply 44 of 53
    The original move to Chip & PIN (led by EMVCo, which was originally Europay, Mastercard and Visa - hence 'EMV'), was motivated by (a growing annually) card fraud. The figures at the time that were being thrown around is that Visa (and others) were losing ~$800M/year in fraudulent card transactions (across Europe), which they were paying (not the merchants). When the Chip & PIN requirement was put in place, they gave merchants a deadline to migrate to certified C&P terminals for all card transactions, after which any fraud as a result of not using a certified terminal they (the merchant) would be responsible to cover, which was a big motivating factor for replacing all terminals at the time (the company I worked for at the time LOVED that requirement, as they got to sell into those merchants across Europe new Chip & PIN terminals and other POS related upgrades, hardware and software both!). It's not so much that merchants don't want to accept a card without PIN, it's that any fraud (now) as a result is their responsibility to pay.
  • Reply 45 of 53
    jingojingo Posts: 91member

    @Lymf: Great post. Couldn't agree more with everything you say. The banks are the only people who benefit from credit cards in the long run - many "poor" people here in the UK are poor because they are crippled by the debt they have taken on which consumes a large proportion of their income. And what do they get in return? Some consumer item which loses most of its value as soon as they get it home.

     

    In a sane world debt would only be used for investment in appreciating assets or to grow a business, which is how capitalism is meant to work. Debt for consumption is crazy and a fast downward spiral for most people. Cars are a possible exception as long as their purchase cost is low, so that the utility they provide outweighs the interest payments.

  • Reply 46 of 53
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,046member
    Sorry if this is a stupid user question but how did Apple activate my iP 6 to allow card loading.  I thought I'd have to wait for iOS 9.

    No, you most certainly don't need iOS 9. At least, not in the U.S. You do need the iPhone 6, or an AppleWatch with iPhone 5 and above (where the Watch can be used as the payment device).
  • Reply 47 of 53
    Couldn't load any cards at work on the public wifi- Something to do with the security settings I assume, whereby iOS stated I had no network connection. Had to wait until I got home, and as HSBC and Barclays aren't signed up yet, that left me with just the Amex.

    Loaded in perfectly and was very quick... Now to try it out! Does anyone know if Sainsburys has contactless terminals widespread in their stores?
  • Reply 48 of 53
    chiachia Posts: 694member
     
    Originally Posted by Jingo View Post

    @Lymf: Great post. Couldn't agree more with everything you say. The banks are the only people who benefit from credit cards in the long run - many "poor" people here in the UK are poor because they are crippled by the debt they have taken on which consumes a large proportion of their income. And what do they get in return? Some consumer item which loses most of its value as soon as they get it home.

     

    In a sane world debt would only be used for investment in appreciating assets or to grow a business, which is how capitalism is meant to work. Debt for consumption is crazy and a fast downward spiral for most people. Cars are a possible exception as long as their purchase cost is low, so that the utility they provide outweighs the interest payments.


     

    People are not compelled to take a credit card nor are they compelled in what they choose to buy with it.

    Let the debtor and the buyer beware!

  • Reply 49 of 53
    chiachia Posts: 694member

    I've spent the day shopping with ? Pay and an ? Watch.

    I've used it at Waitrose, LIDL, Asda, Tesco and paid for my London bus fare with the ? Watch, all without a hitch and without delay at the terminal.

     

    It is definitely faster and easier than fumbling into your pocket or handbag and then into your wallet or purse to find a card.

     

    From my experience today ? Pay may well be the killer app for the ? Watch.

    It makes it a joy to pay!

  • Reply 50 of 53
    chiachia Posts: 694member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by StageofHistory View Post

    Does anyone know if Sainsburys has contactless terminals widespread in their stores?

     

    Most annoyingly they have the appropriate terminals installed in many stores but are yet to activate it to accept contactless payments.

     

    From my experience today they'd be wise to offer contactless payments asap if they're not to lose custom to their competitors who do.

  • Reply 51 of 53
    jingojingo Posts: 91member

    "People are not compelled to take a credit card nor are they compelled in what they choose to buy with it. Let the debtor and the buyer beware!"

     

    The neo-liberal view! A view that is based on a very narrow view of the world which doesn't take account of reality. Even Alan Greenspan realised that...

     

    You think it's as simple as that, but unfortunately you are ignoring the reality that not everyone (by a very long way) is sensible and responsible. I stand by what I say - as a society we are building a debt mountain and debt is not a good thing unless it is used for investment.

     

    People really are crippling themselves with debt and that is not a good thing for society because we all end up having to deal with the consequences. It might be in the (very) short-term interests of the companies who benefit from that debt being used to buy their products, and from the banks who get the interest payments, but no-one who uses debt for consumption benefits in the long run.

  • Reply 52 of 53
    chiachia Posts: 694member
    Originally Posted by Jingo View Post
    "People are not compelled to take a credit card nor are they compelled in what they choose to buy with it. Let the debtor and the buyer beware!"

     

    The neo-liberal view! A view that is based on a very narrow view of the world which doesn't take account of reality. Even Alan Greenspan realised that...

     

    You think it's as simple as that, but unfortunately you are ignoring the reality that not everyone (by a very long way) is sensible and responsible. I stand by what I say - as a society we are building a debt mountain and debt is not a good thing unless it is used for investment.


     

     

    This is way way off topic especially when ? Pay can be used with debit cards - no debt necessary.

     

    You're ignoring the reality that in the economically healthy countries across the world, most people are sensible and responsible in the amounts borrowed and loaned, the repayments are made without default.

     

    You do not take into account that people may be content with the value of the consumable at the time of purchase and the burden of the debt in acquiring them at that given moment when it's needed, e.g. a flight to visit a seriously ill relative is a consumable, it's not an investment nor an asset for the future, yet it'll be of high value and a debt burden the travelling relative is likely to willingly bear.

  • Reply 53 of 53
    Boots and Wetherspoons in Plymouth and Truro accept unlimited transactions. Lloyds late from the starting line as expected. More an old shabby but much loved nag than rearing virile black stallion.
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