Apple making 'premium' accessory packaging mandatory at Apple Stores - report

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 2015
Apple is reportedly beginning to enforce a mandatory policy of standardized, Apple-like product packaging for at least some third-party accessories sold in Apple Stores, according to an internal company memo.




Boxes must now have white backgrounds, Apple-approved typefaces, and "consistent placement" of logos and icons, a document obtained by Business Insider indicates. Product photos must match the angles Apple uses, and the company is even demanding "better quality packaging material." Older, pre-policy packages are being sent back to the warehouse.

Only Incase, LifeProof, Mophie, Sena, Tech21, and Logitech (now Logi) are identified as firms having to conform to the new standard. The memo, which the publication paraphrased to protect its source, states that the goal of the policy is to give an "elevated" look to third-party accessories, making the accessory shelves at Apple Stores "more visually appealing and easier to navigate."

The new memo says that Apple has been working with the named companies for the past six months. So-called "premium" packaging began appearing at Apple Stores in early July, debuting on Mophie products, though the other firms were also said to take part.

Apple has been working on a high-end aesthetic revamp for its retail chain, an effort which ramped up with the launch of the Apple Watch. Typically this has involved renovating and reorganizing stores, with plans reportedly crafted jointly by retail chief Angela Ahrendts and design czar Jony ive.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 31
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Their stores, their rules.
  • Reply 2 of 31
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,729member
    Apple is reportedly beginning to enforce a mandatory policy of standardized, Apple-like product packaging for at least some third-party accessories sold in Apple Stores, according to an internal company memo.

    I hope this is nothing but a rumor. I am all for design guidelines and design 'education', but please allow for design originality and creativity.
  • Reply 3 of 31
    I bought an Incase 6 Plus case in the new packaging at the Plaza Apple Store in KC. It was nice to test the case out before buying vs the hard plastic anti theft regular retail packaging that cut my hands up just trying to open it.
  • Reply 4 of 31
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,729member
    jamesreb wrote: »
    I bought an Incase 6 Plus case in the new packaging at the Plaza Apple Store in KC. It was nice to test the case out before buying vs the hard plastic anti theft regular retail packaging that cut my hands up just trying to open it.

    OK, if it means no more 'impossible-to-open, impossible to touch and try' plastic packaging I'm definitely supporting the initiative. Much as aI like Apple's packaging I hope third party manufacturers will not be forced into mimicking Apple. But stiff plastic, welded shut solutions must go, no question.
  • Reply 5 of 31
    jamesreb wrote: »
    I bought an Incase 6 Plus case in the new packaging at the Plaza Apple Store in KC. It was nice to test the case out before buying vs the hard plastic anti theft regular retail packaging that cut my hands up just trying to open it.

    God I hate that hard ultrasonically-welded anti theft plastic packaging. And I've seen them slashed open anyway (with merchandise missing) at stores as evidence of retail theft, so it's not working to stop loss. Like CurrentC, it's designed for the benefit of retailers, not customer needs. Even Amazon sells some things in "frustration free packaging." And the environmental impact of tossing a shit load of plastic packaging, ugh.
  • Reply 6 of 31

    What a great matchup between an overpaid, don't-know-but-I'll-push-a-consumer-brand-further-upscale-because-that's-all-I-know retail exec and an overhyped, colorblind "design czar". We love lab coats! We love lab coats! :p

     

    Product design is still top-notch if a bit sanitized, but it's certainly ironic to look back and see the old Apple adverts that made fun of beige, plain packaging and computers. Welcome to the sanitation store!!! You can get whatever you want, as long as it's beige, ahem, white! Hahahaha.

     

    Not really liking where all this seems to be going. Hmmm.

     

    Just pondering...

  • Reply 7 of 31
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member

    Limited shelf space in Apple stores. The accessories that really want to be there will wear chicken suits if Apple asks.

  • Reply 8 of 31
    inklinginkling Posts: 773member
    How dull. One thing I hate about the Seattle suburb of Bellevue is the dullness of its buildings. Codes dictate far too much. I like variety.

    Sounds like Apple stores will soon suffer from that same affliction. Instead of reddish-brown buildings, it'll be white boxes. In most stores, white boxes mean cheap, generic stuff.
  • Reply 9 of 31
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    Their stores, their rules.



    And you will be paying for it.

  • Reply 10 of 31
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by paxman View Post





    I hope this is nothing but a rumor. I am all for design guidelines and design 'education', but please allow for design originality and creativity.



    Nothing, absolutely NOTHING is stopping ‘design originality and creativity.’ These third party vendors are not forced to be in Apple’s stores. They can be as original and creative as they want to outside of the Apple store. None of them are exclusive to the Apple store. They sell their products in just about every retail outlet that exists. On top of that Apple stores’ accessories sections have been shrinking over the years. These accessory vendors exist at the pleasure of Apple to begin with and as another poster already stated, “Their stores, their rules.” I submit that your opinion is nothing more than random foot stomping over Apple asserting its ownership of its stores. Or would you claim that a vendor should be allowed to display their product in a brown paper bag on Apple’s store shelves if they so choose?

  • Reply 11 of 31
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,971member
    Sounds a little too precious to me. There's a fine line to walk here, and I hope Apple isn't going too Burberry on us. If it's about ridding us of welded plastic product safes, fine. But row upon row of little white boxes . . . not so much.
  • Reply 12 of 31
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post



    row upon row of little white boxes . . . not so much.

     

    'Think different' in action.

     

     

    Whoops, sorry about that, what were we thinking? - we now return you to normal programming.

  • Reply 13 of 31

    Good for them. 

  • Reply 14 of 31
    Blister packs suck. I'm all for this. Third parties can package however they want via Amazon. I don't want Apple Stores to start to look like those crappy iPhone case kiosks (not that they really were).
  • Reply 15 of 31
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,729member
    lkrupp wrote: »

    Nothing, absolutely NOTHING is stopping ‘design originality and creativity.’ These third party vendors are not forced to be in Apple’s stores. They can be as original and creative as they want to outside of the Apple store. None of them are exclusive to the Apple store. They sell their products in just about every retail outlet that exists. On top of that Apple stores’ accessories sections have been shrinking over the years. These accessory vendors exist at the pleasure of Apple to begin with and as another poster already stated, “Their stores, their rules.” I submit that your opinion is nothing more than random foot stomping over Apple asserting its ownership of its stores. Or would you claim that a vendor should be allowed to display their product in a brown paper bag on Apple’s store shelves if they so choose?
    No. As I said I am all for design advice and guidelines. And yes, Apple can do what it likes, I am not disputing that. I love Apple design but there is something perverse about design fascism. Just because Apple is big and powerful and luckily for us, at the cutting edge of a modern minimalist aesthetic it shouldn't mean that smaller companies should have to mold their creative expression to suit Apple. Apple would never accept that from anyone else.

    But having said that I really don't think this is what's happening. It would have been good if the article gave us a little more insight.
  • Reply 16 of 31
    inkling wrote: »
    How dull. One thing I hate about the Seattle suburb of Bellevue is the dullness of its buildings. Codes dictate far too much. I like variety.

    Sounds like Apple stores will soon suffer from that same affliction. Instead of reddish-brown buildings, it'll be white boxes. In most stores, white boxes mean cheap, generic stuff.

    Hooray! Debbie Downer returns!
  • Reply 17 of 31
    I can understand Apple wanting to upgrade the look and feel of the product packaging on their shelves in order to keep its high standards, but I have two comments:

    1) As a vendor, I would like the freedom to allow my packaging to standout thru differentiation, and Apple seems to want to kill that
    2) As a consumer, I will be totally confused by 1000 white boxes with products perfectly centered on the front at a 3/4 tilted view. How the *bleep* am I supposed to find anything visually?
  • Reply 18 of 31
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,729member
    sog35 wrote: »
    its a package.  Dude. Get over it.

    The vendor is free to use their original packages outside of Apple stores. I can understand that Apple does not want to have a wall of color that looks messy.

    Many stores follow the same practice.
    Oh, I'm over it, OK, but I have an opinion about it. And it is not a package we are talking about, it is a policy. I is not as if I'm laboring a point, here, but I do find the subject of some interest. If you don't care, though, which you clearly don't, why don't you just butt out. Why are you even here right now?
  • Reply 19 of 31
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member

    This just means that those items bought in an Apple store will cost me. Apple packing requirements are not cheap, they come at a price that is for sure. Either they are going to pass the cost onto consumers or eat in margins what do you think these companies will do in the end. They already have to give up 30% to be in the Apple store.

  • Reply 20 of 31
    Why would Apple want consumers to confuse inferior products for their own? It's bad enough when you go on eBay looking for an Apple iPhone charging cable or headphones and every two bit knock-off has the Apple "look."

    Rather than insist that other vendors apply the Apple "trade dress" to their packages, Apple should insist that they not.
Sign In or Register to comment.