Apple continues enterprise push with new Cisco partnership, will optimize networks for iOS

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 2015
Corporate users will soon have one more reason to choose Apple's mobile devices over those from other firms, as networking behemoth Cisco is set to team up with the Cupertino company to optimize enterprise networks for iPhones, iPads, and iOS apps.




The two Silicon Valley stalwarts will work together to ensure that iOS devices work more efficiently on Cisco-powered networks, including deeper integration with Cisco's industry standard voice and video communications products. Corporate users might be able to use their iPhone or the Cisco handset on their desk interchangeably, for example.

"iOS is the world's best mobile platform, and nearly every Fortune 500 and Global 500 company today has put iOS at the center of their mobile strategy," Apple chief Tim Cook said in a release. "iPhone and iPad have become essential tools for the modern workforce and are changing the way work gets done. Together with Cisco, we believe we can give businesses the tools to maximize the potential of iOS and help employees become even more productive using the devices they already love."

This marks the second time in the past year that Apple has sought to expand its enterprise share by collaborating with traditional corporate IT providers. Last July, the company unveiled a wide-ranging partnership with IBM.

Like IBM, Cisco has deep roots in the enterprise. The company is the largest provider of enterprise networking devices and networked services in the world, and its offerings touch nearly every facet of corporate telecommunications.

"Through this engineering and go-to-market partnership, we're offering our joint customers the ability to seamlessly extend that awesome Cisco environment to their favorite iOS devices," Cisco Executive Chairman John Chambers said. "Together, we're going to help teams achieve higher levels of productivity and effectiveness."

Other Cisco services that will see tighter iOS integration include WebEx, Spark, and Telepresence.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Can someone cut through the corporate jargon and explain exactly what this means?
  • Reply 2 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Can someone cut through the corporate jargon and explain exactly what this means?

     

    Cisco reaffirmed its commitment to producing white papers and other advertising featuring Apple devices.

  • Reply 3 of 34
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member

    Maybe this will convince Cisco to improve WebEx for Mac:

    1. Outlook productivity tools not working in Outlook 2016.

    2. WebEx recordings can't be converted using a Mac.

  • Reply 4 of 34
    It mean IT department will expend more on AAPL stuffs.
  • Reply 5 of 34
    rogifan wrote: »
    Can someone cut through the corporate jargon and explain exactly what this means?

    The one feature that would be possible is "follow me" telepresence using iPhones. So instead of a desk phone and a cell phone, a company can just issue an iPhone to employees and when you're in the office, the calls will reach your iPhone via wifi, then when you step outside the building, it seamlessly switches to AT&T or Rogers or T-Mobile or what-have-you without interruption. I can also see better VPN integration into iOS so someone can roam around the office using an iPad, for example, while still maintaining a secure connection for all data.

    Aside from those examples, there might be some other proprietary protocols offered by Cisco that iPhone + iPad could support, but I'm not familiar with those.
  • Reply 6 of 34
    Wow sound good Cisco coming out soon for Apple with Cisco together work are awesome!!
  • Reply 7 of 34
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,034member
    sog35 wrote: »
    Apple is killing in enterprise.

    IBM, Watch, and now Cisco.  iPad pro coming soon also.
    watch out for Samsung -TP Link partnership next lol.
  • Reply 8 of 34
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Can someone cut through the corporate jargon and explain exactly what this means?



    It means flying chairs at Microsoft and musical chairs at HP (again).

     

    In enterprise the money's in the services, but to get the services you need to provide the hardware (in this case servers) that meet the customers' demands. Cisco is going to make their hardware (and OS) more responsive to Apple's iOS devices, similar in what IBM is doing, although IBM is providing services beyond their own hardware, and including services on/for iOS devices.

     

    The net effect is that major players, IBM and Cisco, are smoothing the way ahead for Apple to be the prime vendor in enterprise for its products — especially the iPhone.

     

    Keep in mind that in the smart phone segment, Android has a serious security issue (even including Samsung built-in Knox on a couple phones). Additionally Microsoft missed the GSA RFQ by several years so they are out of the game for the government business, while Apple is the ONLY vendor for tablets and the leading vendor for smart phones. (Blackberry is in the smartphone game, but mostly as a footnote).

     

    Tim is doing what Steve couldn't get done and that is to build strong alliances and partnerships to seriously penetrate the enterprise market... and not just with the smaller players but the Fortune-500-scale industries too.

     

    In saying all that, I don't mean to diminish what Microsoft has done for Apple by including the Office apps in all iOS devices BEFORE doing so for their own smartphone and Windows 10.

  • Reply 9 of 34
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    The one feature that would be possible is "follow me" telepresence using iPhones. So instead of a desk phone and a cell phone, a company can just issue an iPhone to employees and when you're in the office, the calls will reach your iPhone via wifi, then when you step outside the building, it seamlessly switches to AT&T or Rogers or T-Mobile or what-have-you without interruption. I can also see better VPN integration into iOS so someone can roam around the office using an iPad, for example, while still maintaining a secure connection for all data.

    Aside from those examples, there might be some other proprietary protocols offered by Cisco that iPhone + iPad could support, but I'm not familiar with those.

    Where I work I'm not even sure why we have desk phones anymore because I can take and make calls from my laptop. To me the biggest barrier to iOS devices becoming truly useful in the enterprise is active directory support. If I want to access files on a network drive via my iPad I have to do it via a Good for Enterprise app. If I want to actually edit a document I have to use another app called Polaris Office for Good and then I can only edit in apps that are whitelisted (which doesn't include any Microsoft Office apps). A pretty frustrating experience.
  • Reply 10 of 34
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

     



    It means flying chairs at Microsoft and musical chairs at HP (again).

     


     

    Thanks for making me spit my coffee out from laughing.

  • Reply 11 of 34
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

     

     

    Thanks for making me spit my coffee out from laughing.




    That's a lot of chairs.

  • Reply 12 of 34
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CarlosJk View Post



    It mean IT department will expend more on AAPL stuffs.



    I hope you're right.  Not too long ago I left a company where the hate of all things Apple in the IT department was unreal.  Few people if any in the company wanted the crap phones and computers IT was handing out.

     

    Ironic because we were reminded on a daily basis from the person at the top who our customers were, internal and external.  None of that applied to the IT department.  They did whatever the hell they wanted.

  • Reply 13 of 34
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,120member
    At my work there is currently substantial penetration of iOS devices in an otherwise MS only world. The IT department is spending a lot of time devising annoying profiles that strangely enough, do not seem to apply to surface products but successfully cripple a lot of useful iOS features. The head of IT is upfront about shifting everyone to MS only because a surface pro is so much better..

    The It department will have its revenge on the user as soon as the current CEO moves on.
  • Reply 14 of 34
    razorpit wrote: »

    I hope you're right.  Not too long ago I let a company where the hate of all things Apple in the IT department was unreal.  Few people if any in the company wanted the crap phones and computers IT was handing out.

    Ironic because we were reminded on a daily basis from the person at the top who our customers were, internal and external.  None of that applied to the IT department.  They did whatever the hell they wanted.

    I think they've feel right at home in these forums talking to The Usual Suspects.
  • Reply 15 of 34
    It won't be too long from now when disgruntled competitors claim:

    [QUOTE]Nobody ever got fired for buying Apple.
    [/QUOTE]

    And that means $ Billions to enterprise and much to gruntled AAPL/Apple fans.
  • Reply 16 of 34
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by razorpit View Post

     



    I hope you're right.  Not too long ago I let a company where the hate of all things Apple in the IT department was unreal.  Few people if any in the company wanted the crap phones and computers IT was handing out.

     

    Ironic because we were reminded on a daily basis from the person at the top who our customers were, internal and external.  None of that applied to the IT department.  They did whatever the hell they wanted.




    I really don't see the hate. Not like before. The IT guys all have iPhones and iPads now. Yeah, they are still afraid of Macs but fortunately for them they don't have to work on them because they don't ever need any work. We coexist pretty well in our dept. We can traverse their Windows network, but they don't know how to find us. We have our own router and IP block with tons of Linux and Macs. They just steer clear of us and we never ask them for anything.

  • Reply 17 of 34
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fallenjt View Post





    watch out for Samsung -TP Link partnership next lol.

     

     

    Actually Google has that locked up..... there new $200 wireless "OnHub" is actually a TP-Link product with some Google stuff shoved in it....

  • Reply 18 of 34
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,034member
    bkkcanuck wrote: »

    Actually Google has that locked up..... there new $200 wireless "OnHub" is actually a TP-Link product with some Google stuff shoved in it....
    I read that. I thought it's only on one product. I'm talking about partnership for entire enterprise product lines.
  • Reply 19 of 34
    sergiozsergioz Posts: 338member
    Cisco just acquired OpenDNS that keeps things secure and fast in the world of internet!
  • Reply 20 of 34
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,168member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

     



    It means flying chairs at Microsoft and musical chairs at HP (again).

     

    In enterprise the money's in the services, but to get the services you need to provide the hardware (in this case servers) that meet the customers' demands. Cisco is going to make their hardware (and OS) more responsive to Apple's iOS devices, similar in what IBM is doing, although IBM is providing services beyond their own hardware, and including services on/for iOS devices.

     

    The net effect is that major players, IBM and Cisco, are smoothing the way ahead for Apple to be the prime vendor in enterprise for its products — especially the iPhone.

     

    Keep in mind that in the smart phone segment, Android has a serious security issue (even including Samsung built-in Knox on a couple phones). Additionally Microsoft missed the GSA RFQ by several years so they are out of the game for the government business, while Apple is the ONLY vendor for tablets and the leading vendor for smart phones. (Blackberry is in the smartphone game, but mostly as a footnote).

     

    Tim is doing what Steve couldn't get done and that is to build strong alliances and partnerships to seriously penetrate the enterprise market... and not just with the smaller players but the Fortune-500-scale industries too.

     

    In saying all that, I don't mean to diminish what Microsoft has done for Apple by including the Office apps in all iOS devices BEFORE doing so for their own smartphone and Windows 10.




    I don't think MS worries too much.  They already have partnerships with many enterprises vendors, including Cisco and IBM.  Plus, they have a long list of services, applications and the Surface line, that I don't think that enterprises acquiring more Apple devices could hurt them too much.

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